Source: UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE submitted to
BEHAVIOR AND BIOLOGY OF THE ASIAN LONGHORNED BEETLE
Sponsoring Institution
Agricultural Research Service/USDA
Project Status
NEW
Funding Source
Reporting Frequency
Annual
Accession No.
0415192
Grant No.
(N/A)
Project No.
1926-22000-027-04S
Proposal No.
(N/A)
Multistate No.
(N/A)
Program Code
(N/A)
Project Start Date
Jan 1, 2009
Project End Date
Dec 31, 2013
Grant Year
(N/A)
Project Director
SMITH M T
Recipient Organization
UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE
(N/A)
NEWARK,DE 19717
Performing Department
(N/A)
Non Technical Summary
(N/A)
Animal Health Component
10%
Research Effort Categories
Basic
40%
Applied
10%
Developmental
50%
Classification

Knowledge Area (KA)Subject of Investigation (SOI)Field of Science (FOS)Percent
2150699113050%
2152110113050%
Goals / Objectives
The objectives of this cooperative research project are (1) to investigate host selection, host colonization and the nutritional ecology of the Asian Longhorned Beetle (ALB), ANOPLOPHORA GLABRIPENNIS; (2) to identify ecological and behavioral traits vulnerable to intervention and development of detection, monitoring, biological control and other IPM strategies; and (3) to develop technologies and methodologies for optimally implementing these strategies into eradication and population management programs directed at ALB and closely related invasive insect pest species.
Project Methods
Complementary field and laboratory studies will be conducted. (1) Comparative studies of adult ALB behavioral responsiveness to characterized formulated host odor blends of ACER MONO, ACER NEGUNDO, ACER PLATANOIDES and ACER TRUNCATUM will be evaluated in an olfactometer under laboratory conditions at BIIRU. (2) Comparative studies of adult ALB behavioral responsiveness to ACER MONO, ACER NEGUNDO, ACER PLATANOIDES and ACER TRUNCATUM trees will be evaluated in an olfactometer under laboratory conditions at BIIRU. (3) Evaluate adult ALB behavior as a function of physiological and biological factors (e.g. pre vs. post maturation; mated vs. non-mated; pre vs. post oviposition). (4) Adult ALB attraction to olfactometer active blends will be evaluated under natural field conditions in China, including evaluation of formulation, blend ratio and attractive radius. This research will collectively complement our ongoing investigations of host selection by ALB and identification of artificial lures for detection, monitoring, management and eradication of ALB; and elucidate the mechanisms of host selection and colonization by ALB.

Progress 10/01/11 to 09/30/12

Outputs
Progress Report Objectives (from AD-416): The objectives of this cooperative research project are (1) to investigate host selection, host colonization and the nutritional ecology of the Asian Longhorned Beetle (ALB), ANOPLOPHORA GLABRIPENNIS; (2) to identify ecological and behavioral traits vulnerable to intervention and development of detection, monitoring, biological control and other IPM strategies; and (3) to develop technologies and methodologies for optimally implementing these strategies into eradication and population management programs directed at ALB and closely related invasive insect pest species. Approach (from AD-416): Complementary field and laboratory studies will be conducted. (1) Comparative studies of adult ALB behavioral responsiveness to characterized formulated host odor blends of ACER MONO, ACER NEGUNDO, ACER PLATANOIDES and ACER TRUNCATUM will be evaluated in an olfactometer under laboratory conditions at BIIRU. (2) Comparative studies of adult ALB behavioral responsiveness to ACER MONO, ACER NEGUNDO, ACER PLATANOIDES and ACER TRUNCATUM trees will be evaluated in an olfactometer under laboratory conditions at BIIRU. (3) Evaluate adult ALB behavior as a function of physiological and biological factors (e.g. pre vs. post maturation; mated vs. non-mated; pre vs. post oviposition). (4) Adult ALB attraction to olfactometer active blends will be evaluated under natural field conditions in China, including evaluation of formulation, blend ratio and attractive radius. This research will collectively complement our ongoing investigations of host selection by ALB and identification of artificial lures for detection, monitoring, management and eradication of ALB; and elucidate the mechanisms of host selection and colonization by ALB. In collaboration with Simon Fraser University (SFU), University of Delaware (UD), and Caixin Xian Forestry Bureau, Henan Province, China, we designed studies to evaluate ALB population level and landscape parameters at multiple field sites in the Caixin District. Our Chinese collaborator has been conducting these studies, and although studies are ongoing, results are identifying potential field sites that best meet specific requirements for our evaluation of the relative attraction of ALB to Acer mono trees, artificial lures of host odors and beetle produced sex pheromones. This research addresses objective 1.1.1. In collaboration with UD, we continued development of predictive models of adult ALB life expectancy across the climatic regions at risk in the US. We then integrated the preliminary data with our degree day model of ALB emergence to produce the first predictive model for forecasting the seasonal occurrence of adult ALB. In cooperation with UD, APHIS, USFS and state agencies, we interfaced our models with local climatic conditions in high risk areas across thirteen states from ME to MN, and have been providing stakeholders with weekly forecasts to optimizing early detection, survey and control strategies. In collaboration with UD, we continued to identify the geographic and host range of ALB and CLB in Asia, and integrated the respective results with the current geographic distribution of mixed deciduous forests and citrus in China. Collectively, these results identified regions in China likely harboring effective parasitic wasp for use in biological control of ALB and CLB in the US and Europe.

Impacts
(N/A)

Publications


    Progress 10/01/10 to 09/30/11

    Outputs
    Progress Report Objectives (from AD-416) The objectives of this cooperative research project are (1) to investigate host selection, host colonization and the nutritional ecology of the Asian Longhorned Beetle (ALB), ANOPLOPHORA GLABRIPENNIS; (2) to identify ecological and behavioral traits vulnerable to intervention and development of detection, monitoring, biological control and other IPM strategies; and (3) to develop technologies and methodologies for optimally implementing these strategies into eradication and population management programs directed at ALB and closely related invasive insect pest species. Approach (from AD-416) Complementary field and laboratory studies will be conducted. (1) Comparative studies of adult ALB behavioral responsiveness to characterized formulated host odor blends of ACER MONO, ACER NEGUNDO, ACER PLATANOIDES and ACER TRUNCATUM will be evaluated in an olfactometer under laboratory conditions at BIIRU. (2) Comparative studies of adult ALB behavioral responsiveness to ACER MONO, ACER NEGUNDO, ACER PLATANOIDES and ACER TRUNCATUM trees will be evaluated in an olfactometer under laboratory conditions at BIIRU. (3) Evaluate adult ALB behavior as a function of physiological and biological factors (e.g. pre vs. post maturation; mated vs. non-mated; pre vs. post oviposition). (4) Adult ALB attraction to olfactometer active blends will be evaluated under natural field conditions in China, including evaluation of formulation, blend ratio and attractive radius. This research will collectively complement our ongoing investigations of host selection by ALB and identification of artificial lures for detection, monitoring, management and eradication of ALB; and elucidate the mechanisms of host selection and colonization by ALB. In collaboration with the Simon Frasier University, preliminary lab studies were initiated to compare the relative attraction of ALB attraction to Painted Maple trees vs. odors (volatiles) isolated from Painted Maple. Studies are in progress at the time of this report. In collaboration with Animal Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS), we interfaced our degree day model of ALB development with geographic information systems (GIS) to provide federal, state and international agencies with weekly forecasts of ALB, thereby optimizing early detection, survey and control strategies. We identified the geographic and host range of ALB in Asia, which when interfaced with GIS, will focus exploration, discovery and collection of exotic natural enemies of ALB in China as potential biological control agents of ALB in the US and Europe. Communication with Cooperators was by emails and phone calls.

    Impacts
    (N/A)

    Publications


      Progress 10/01/09 to 09/30/10

      Outputs
      Progress Report Objectives (from AD-416) The objectives of this cooperative research project are (1) to investigate host selection, host colonization and the nutritional ecology of the Asian Longhorned Beetle (ALB), ANOPLOPHORA GLABRIPENNIS; (2) to identify ecological and behavioral traits vulnerable to intervention and development of detection, monitoring, biological control and other IPM strategies; and (3) to develop technologies and methodologies for optimally implementing these strategies into eradication and population management programs directed at ALB and closely related invasive insect pest species. Approach (from AD-416) Complementary field and laboratory studies will be conducted. (1) Comparative studies of adult ALB behavioral responsiveness to characterized formulated host odor blends of ACER MONO, ACER NEGUNDO, ACER PLATANOIDES and ACER TRUNCATUM will be evaluated in an olfactometer under laboratory conditions at BIIRU. (2) Comparative studies of adult ALB behavioral responsiveness to ACER MONO, ACER NEGUNDO, ACER PLATANOIDES and ACER TRUNCATUM trees will be evaluated in an olfactometer under laboratory conditions at BIIRU. (3) Evaluate adult ALB behavior as a function of physiological and biological factors (e.g. pre vs. post maturation; mated vs. non-mated; pre vs. post oviposition). (4) Adult ALB attraction to olfactometer active blends will be evaluated under natural field conditions in China, including evaluation of formulation, blend ratio and attractive radius. This research will collectively complement our ongoing investigations of host selection by ALB and identification of artificial lures for detection, monitoring, management and eradication of ALB; and elucidate the mechanisms of host selection and colonization by ALB. We conducted forecasting for ALB using our degree-day model and provided updates to federal and state agencies in the Northeast Atlantic region. As a result of accurate forecasting and timely alerts, agencies optimized survey efforts for early detection of ALB. We completed development of the first degree-day model for forecasting CLB. In collaboration with Plant Protection Agencies in Italy and Holland, we are now conducting studies to validate the model and provided updates to agencies in Europe, U.S. and China. We completed development and optimization of models for predicting the distribution of ALB within infestations. Validation of the models was initiated. We initiated studies to evaluate key behaviors of native parasitoids as potential biological control agents of ALB. There is no progress to report on this project during this reporting cycle due to insufficient funding. Communication was by conference calls and email. These studies were monitored by conference calls and email communications.

      Impacts
      (N/A)

      Publications


        Progress 10/01/08 to 09/30/09

        Outputs
        Progress Report Objectives (from AD-416) The objectives of this cooperative research project are (1) to investigate host selection, host colonization and the nutritional ecology of the Asian Longhorned Beetle (ALB), ANOPLOPHORA GLABRIPENNIS; (2) to identify ecological and behavioral traits vulnerable to intervention and development of detection, monitoring, biological control and other IPM strategies; and (3) to develop technologies and methodologies for optimally implementing these strategies into eradication and population management programs directed at ALB and closely related invasive insect pest species. Approach (from AD-416) Complementary field and laboratory studies will be conducted. (1) Comparative studies of adult ALB behavioral responsiveness to characterized formulated host odor blends of ACER MONO, ACER NEGUNDO, ACER PLATANOIDES and ACER TRUNCATUM will be evaluated in an olfactometer under laboratory conditions at BIIRU. (2) Comparative studies of adult ALB behavioral responsiveness to ACER MONO, ACER NEGUNDO, ACER PLATANOIDES and ACER TRUNCATUM trees will be evaluated in an olfactometer under laboratory conditions at BIIRU. (3) Evaluate adult ALB behavior as a function of physiological and biological factors (e.g. pre vs. post maturation; mated vs. non-mated; pre vs. post oviposition). (4) Adult ALB attraction to olfactometer active blends will be evaluated under natural field conditions in China, including evaluation of formulation, blend ratio and attractive radius. This research will collectively complement our ongoing investigations of host selection by ALB and identification of artificial lures for detection, monitoring, management and eradication of ALB; and elucidate the mechanisms of host selection and colonization by ALB. Significant Activities that Support Special Target Populations Development of technologies for detection of incipient populations of ALB in the later stages eradication programs and during post-eradication is essential to prevent permanent establishment. Furthermore, development of technologies for containment of permanently established invasive populations of ALB is essential for suppression, management and slow-the- spread (STS) strategies. Under an SCA with the University of Delaware established in 2009 and in cooperation with the US Forest Service, exploration for native natural enemies of ALB was initiated within the newly discovered invasive population in Worcester, Massachusetts. Studies in 2009 focused on the overwintering generation of natural enemies across a continuum of landscapes (e.g. urban, suburban, forest) and a continuum of spatiotemporal aspects of this invasive population, specifically from the core to the leading edge of the infestation. The objectives and approaches used in these studies are coordinated with biological control studies of the Citrus Longhorned Beetles (CLB) conducted in Italy by the ARS European Biological Control Laboratory. These studies were monitored by conference calls and email communications.

        Impacts
        (N/A)

        Publications