Source: AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE submitted to
ALTERNATIVE CROPS AND VALUE-ADDED PRODUCTS FOR MISSISSIPPI
Sponsoring Institution
Agricultural Research Service/USDA
Project Status
TERMINATED
Funding Source
Reporting Frequency
Annual
Accession No.
0409141
Grant No.
(N/A)
Project No.
6402-21410-004-00D
Proposal No.
(N/A)
Multistate No.
(N/A)
Program Code
(N/A)
Project Start Date
Dec 15, 2004
Project End Date
Feb 28, 2009
Grant Year
(N/A)
Project Director
YOUNG L D
Recipient Organization
AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE
(N/A)
STONEVILLE,MS 38776
Performing Department
(N/A)
Non Technical Summary
(N/A)
Animal Health Component
50%
Research Effort Categories
Basic
0%
Applied
50%
Developmental
50%
Classification

Knowledge Area (KA)Subject of Investigation (SOI)Field of Science (FOS)Percent
6042220106014%
6043399106010%
6042299106076%
Goals / Objectives
Determine suitability of Winter Rose poinsettia as a cut flower crop. Evaluate incorporated and unincorporated rates of chicken litter as fertilizer for cotton production. Determine annual and economic performance of steers grazed on standing corn. Determine optimum planting time, mulching and soil conditions, harvest regimes, and pest pressure effects on Eastern Red Cedar and Mayapple to be used as medicinal herbs. Quantify and improve lycopene production in Mississippi grown tomatoes and watermelons and evaluate the economic potential of the system.
Project Methods
Grow Winter Rose poinsettia according to commercial guidelines; harvest; treat with preservatives; evaluate shelf life; evaluate acceptance by consumer panel; and determine economic potential as a cut flower by survey. Apply litter at various rates incorporated or unincorporated to convential and no-till cotton production field; evaluate cotton growth and development as well as yield; and determine economic potential. Graze steers on standing corn or ryegrass; send steers to feedlot for final finishing; and evaluate carcass weight, grade, ribeye area, yield grade, back fat thickness, and economic feasibility. Plant mayapple and red cedar at different times during the year, shade conditions, soil conditions and mulching regimes to determine effect on production of podophyllotoxin. Produce several varieties of fresh-market and processing types of tomato as well as watermelons; measure yield, fruit quality, and disease tolerance; and determine cost of production of lycopene per acre.

Progress 12/15/04 to 02/28/09

Outputs
Progress Report Objectives (from AD-416) Determine suitability of Winter Rose poinsettia as a cut flower crop. Evaluate incorporated and unincorporated rates of chicken litter as fertilizer for cotton production. Determine annual and economic performance of steers grazed on standing corn. Determine optimum planting time, mulching and soil conditions, harvest regimes, and pest pressure effects on Eastern Red Cedar and Mayapple to be used as medicinal herbs. Quantify and improve lycopene production in Mississippi grown tomatoes and watermelons and evaluate the economic potential of the system. Approach (from AD-416) Grow Winter Rose poinsettia according to commercial guidelines; harvest; treat with preservatives; evaluate shelf life; evaluate acceptance by consumer panel; and determine economic potential as a cut flower by survey. Apply litter at various rates incorporated or unincorporated to convential and no-till cotton production field; evaluate cotton growth and development as well as yield; and determine economic potential. Graze steers on standing corn or ryegrass; send steers to feedlot for final finishing; and evaluate carcass weight, grade, ribeye area, yield grade, back fat thickness, and economic feasibility. Plant mayapple and red cedar at different times during the year, shade conditions, soil conditions and mulching regimes to determine effect on production of podophyllotoxin. Produce several varieties of fresh-market and processing types of tomato as well as watermelons; measure yield, fruit quality, and disease tolerance; and determine cost of production of lycopene per acre. Significant Activities that Support Special Target Populations Sykes, D., Couvillion, S., Martin, J., Althen, T., Gerard, P., Crenshaw, M., Ryan P. 2007. Comparison of Raw Soybean and Soybean Meal Diets on Carcass Traits of Gilts. (J Muscle Foods ¿ submitted) Sykes, D., Necaise, K., Brookshire, W., Gerard, P., Cunningham, F., Crenshaw, M., Ryan, P. 2007. Effect of a Ground Raw Soybean Diet on Reproductive Performance in Gilts. ASAS, San Antonio, TX, July 8-12, 2007. Zhang, L., Kyei-Boahen, S. 2007. Growth and Yield of Vegetable Soybean (Edamame) in Mississippi. HortTechnology. 17(1):006-011. Zheljazkov, Valtcho D., Cantrell, Charles L., Ebelhar, M. Wayne, Coker, Christine, Evans, William B. Quality Assessment and Yield of Baikal Skullcap (Scutellaria baicalensis) Grown at Multiple Locations Across Mississippi. MAFES contribution # J-11078. Sloan, R.C., Harkness, S.S. 2006. Field Evaluation of Pollen-Free Sunflower Cultivars for Cut Flower Production. HortTechnology. 16(2):324- 327. Jackson, V., Schilling, M.W., Coggins, P.C., Martin, J.M. 2006. Utilization of Rice Starch in the Formulation of Wheat-Free, Chicken Nuggets. J. Applied Poultry Research. 15(3):417-422. Schilling, M.W., Coggins, P.C. 2007. Utilization of Agglomerative Hierarchical Clustering in the Analysis of Hedonic Scaled Consumer Acceptability Data. J. Sens. Studies. Ebelhar, M. Wayne, Davis, R. Clark, Robinson, Heather R., Evans, Tim A. Evaluation of Organic Fish-based Fertilizer for Potential Use in Cotton Production. Proc. Beltwide Cotton Production Conferences. New Orleans, LA. January 9-12, 2007, pp. 607-610. Accomplishments Evaluation of raw soybeans to enhance reproductive efficiency in gilts. In order to increase swine producer's profits, a study was conducted to advance onset of puberty and cyclic activity in gilts; enhance ovulation rate, embryo implantation, placental development, embryo survival and litter size in gestating sows; and increase piglet survival rate and number of baby pigs to weaning. The most notable outcome observed was the advancement of the onset of puberty in gilts fed raw soybeans (RSB) of which 70% showed first estrus within two weeks of exposure to a mature boar compared to 30% of gilts fed soybean meal (SBM). There were no significant differences in litter size, live birth rates or numbers of baby pigs at weaning (28 days post-partum). The time interval to return to estrus post weaning was significantly longer in the RSB versus the SBM- fed gilts (18.0 ± 4.6 and 13.9 ± 4.8 days, respectively). In addition, evaluation of carcass traits found no detrimental effects on feeding gilts a raw-soybean diet. These studies demonstrate that raw soybeans can be used safely as the protein supplement source in the diets of pre- pubertal and gestating gilts which can result in improved swine producer profits in the U.S. This relates to National Program 101 Food Animal Production problem statement: Reproductive Efficiency. Technology Transfer Number of Non-Peer Reviewed Presentations and Proceedings: 8

Impacts
(N/A)

Publications


    Progress 10/01/05 to 09/30/06

    Outputs
    Progress Report 1. What major problem or issue is being resolved and how are you resolving it (summarize project aims and objectives)? How serious is the problem? Why does it matter? This research contributes to National Program 305, Integrated Crop Production and Protection Systems by evaluating the effect of different agronomic practices on the production and harvest of kenaf, medicinal plants and other value-added production practices, and research on both new and current varieties of kenaf, medicinal plants and other crops contributes to National Program 301, Plant, Microbial and Insect Germplasm Conservation. The research is accomplished through a Specific Cooperative Agreement with Mississippi State University. The goal is to provide farmers with a profitable alternative crop to some of the crops currently grown in the region. Research supported by these funds are aimed at determining optimum agronomic practices for producing and harvesting kenaf and other alternative crops as well as to find new and profitable products made from kenaf fibers as well as other alternative crops. Prices for various crops being grown in the Mississippi Hill and Delta areas have been suppressed for the past 30 years and many farmers are finding it difficult to stay in business. Results from this research should enable many small to medium sized farmers to become profitable from growing and selling kenaf and/or kenaf based products as well as other alternative crops. 2. List by year the currently approved milestones (indicators of research progress) Since research for this project is performed under a Specific Cooperative Agreement with Mississippi State University without ARS scientific contribution, the project has not undergone the formal ARS peer review process; therefore, formal milestones are not available. However, the overall objectives of the research are to determine the agronomic, industrial, animal production, and economic potential of growing alternative crops or adding value to existing products in Mississippi. Alternative crops can be any plant or animal species that is not currently grown in Mississippi on a large scale and can include, but is not limited to, plants for medicinal purposes, (e.g., mayapple, eastern red cedar, Echinacea), etraceuticals (e.g., tomatoes with increased lycopene content), flowers for fresh market, ornamentals, turf, fiber crops (e.g., kenaf), oilseed, industrial crops for energy and alternative fuel production, etc. There are many ways to add value to existing crops or products such as 1) using a byproduct from a process, and 2) finding alternative uses or additives to plant and animal products. Specific research objectives are: (1) determine suitability of Winter Rose poinsettia as a cut flower crop; (2) evaluate incorporated and unincorporated rates of chicken litter as fertilizer for cotton production; (3) determine animal and economic performance of steers grazed on standing corn; (4) determine optimum planting time, mulching and soil conditions, harvest regimes, and pest pressure effects on Eastern Red Cedar and Mayapple to be used as medicinal herbs; and (5) quantify and improve lycopene production in Mississippi grown tomatoes and watermelons and evaluate the economic potential of the system. 4a List the single most significant research accomplishment during FY 2006. Ground raw soybeans increases estrus in sows. Gilts fed ground raw soybean showed 30 percent more first estrus within 14 days of initial exposure to the boar than those fed commercial soybean meal; while conception rates were higher in gilts fed commercial soybean meal, the resorption rate of embryos was also higher than the gilts fed ground raw soybean. This should allow swine producers to experience a reduction in the cost of pig production. This relates to National Program 101 Food Animal Production problem statement: Reproductive Efficiency. 4d Progress report. Utilizing rice flour in the production of gluten-free chicken nuggets was acceptable in sensory testing, and the nuggets can be consumed by individuals that have been diagnosed with celiac disease. Low-fat frankfurters were produced with rice starch that showed potential to improve product quality by improving yields. 5. Describe the major accomplishments to date and their predicted or actual impact. Increased omega-3 fatty acid in farm-raised catfish: Pond-raised channel catfish fed diets amended with specially processed and refined menhaden fish oil had omega-3 highly unsaturated fatty acid (HUFA) content of 7.2% of total lipid content in the fillets. The addition of this free fatty acid in ones diet could reduce the risk of heart disease, improve symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis and be useful in the prevention and treatment of many other diseases related to high cholesterol. Keeping the level of added fish oil to about 2.0 to 2.5%, the level of omega-3 HUFA content of fillets can be increased to at least 7.2% of total lipid content without affecting the traditional mild flavor of the catfish fillets. Consumption of 200 grams of fillet having 7.2% omega-3 HUFA and containing 6.9% total lipid can provide about one gram of omega-3 HUFA to ones normal diet. This relates to National Program 106 Aquaculture problem statement: Quality, Safety and Variety of Aquaculture Products for Consumers. This procedure has the potential of increasing sales of farm-raised catfish through increased appeal for consumer health. Ground raw soybean increases estrus in sows. Gilts fed ground raw soybean showed 30 percent more first estrus within 14 days of initial exposure to the boar than those fed commercial soybean meal; while conception rates were higher in gilts fed commercial soybean meal, the resorption rate of embryos was also higher than the gilts fed ground raw soybean. This should allow swine producers to experience a reduction in the cost of pig production. This relates to National Program 101 Food Animal Production problem statement: Reproductive Efficiency. 7. List your most important publications in the popular press and presentations to organizations and articles written about your work. (NOTE: List your peer reviewed publications below). Adeli, A., D.E. Rowe, H. Tewolde, and M.K. Shankle. 2005. Runoff losses of nitrogen and phosphorus from no-till cotton field fertilized with broiler litter. 2nd Symposium on Safe Management and Utilization of Animal Waste. Proceedings of the 36th Annual Mississippi Water Resources Conference. P. 197-206. Jackson, MS. Evans, W.B., K.W. Hood, K.L. Paridon, and P. Hudson. 2005. Organic vegetable production research in Mississippi: Early successes. Deep South Fruit and Vegetables Growers Conference. Mobile, AL. Evans, W.B., Y. Vizzer-Thaxton, K.L. Paridon, and P. Hudson. 2005. Broiler litter compost vs. synthetic fertilizer: Soil and vegetable crop responses. Proceedings of the American Society of Agronomy Annual Conference. (Poster). Evans, W.B., K.W. Hood, K.L. Paridon, and P. Hudson. 2005. Organic vegetable yield and economics show promise in a Mississippi Trial. Presentation to the American Society of Horticultural Science Annual Conference. Evans, W.B., K.W. Hood, K.L. Paridon, and P. Hudson. 2005. Organic vegetable yield and economics show promise in a Mississippi Trial. HortSci. 40(4) :1093. (Abstract) Jackson, V., M.W. Schilling, P.C. Coggins, and J.M. Martin. 2006 Utilization of rice starch in the formulation of low-fat, wheat-free chicken nuggets. Mississippi Academy of Sciences. Martin, J. and B. Williams. 2005. Effects of beef muscle type with or without enhancement on pre-cooked value-added roast beef. Book of Abstracts: Southern Section American Society of Animal Science. Orlando, FL. Pollard, A.N., Coggins, P.C., C.E. Coker, and P.R. Knight. 2005. Quantitative descriptive analysis methodology for the determination of the consumption of edible daylilies (Hemerocallis spp.). Southern Region American Society of Horticultural Sciences, Little Rock, AR. Pollard, A.N., Coggins, P.C., C.E. Coker, and P.R. Knight. 2005. Quantitative descriptive analysis methodology for the determination of the optimum month for consumption of daylilies (Hemerocallis spp.). Institute of Food Technologists. Shankle, M.W., H. Tewolde, T.F. Garrett, K.R. Sistani, A. Adeli, and D.E. Rowe. 2005. Use of poultry litter as a fertilizer source in no-tillage cotton production. Beltwide Cotton Research Conferences. New Orleans, LA. Sloan, R.C. and S.S. Harkness. 2005. Plant growth regulator effect on lisianthus growth. Annual Report of the North Mississippi Research & Extension Center. Miss. Agr. & For. Exp. Sta. Info. Bul. 419:261-266. Sloan, R.C. and S.S. Harkness. 2005. Hybrid lily cultivar evaluation. Annual Report 2004 of the North Mississippi Research & Extension Center. Miss. Agr. & For. Exp. Sta. Info. Bul. 419:267-275. Sloan, R.C. and S.S. Harkness. 2005. Gladiolus cultivar evaluation. Annual Report of the North Mississippi Research & Extension Center. Miss. Agr. & For. Exp. Sta. Info. Bul. 419:306-308. Sloan, R.C. and S.S. Harkness. 2005. Cut flower research in Mississippi. Southern Nursery Association Research Conference. Atlanta, GA. (Poster). Sykes D., A. Chromiak, S. Couvillion, P. Gerard, M. Crenshaw, S. Willard, and P. Ryan. 2006. Estrus detection in gilts using digital infrared thermal imaging. Southern Section ASAS, Orlando, FL. Sykes D, S Couvillion, J. Martin, T. Althen, P. Gerard, M. Crenshaw, and P. Ryan. 2006. Comparison of raw soybean and soybean meal diets on carcass traits in gilts. Southern Section ASAS, Orlando, FL. Sykes D, S Couvillion, Gerard, B. Rude, F. Cunningham, M. Crenshaw, and P. Ryan. 2006. Evaluation of ground raw soybean diets as a novel approach to enhance reproductive efficiency in gilts. ASAS Annual Meeting, Minneapolis-St. Paul, MN. Tewolde, H., M.W. Shankle, T.F. Garrett, K.R. Sistani, D.E. Rowe, and A. Adeli, 2005. Lack of Incorporation Reduces benefits of poultry litter applied to no-tillage cotton. Beltwide Cotton Research Conferences. New Orleans, LA.

    Impacts
    (N/A)

    Publications


      Progress 10/01/04 to 09/30/05

      Outputs
      1. What major problem or issue is being resolved and how are you resolving it (summarize project aims and objectives)? How serious is the problem? What does it matter? This research contributes to National Program 305, Integrated Crop Production and Protection Systems by evaluating the effect of different agronomic practices on the production and harvest of kenaf, medicinal plants and other value-added production practices, and research on both new and current varieties of kenaf, medicinal plants and other crops contributes to National Program 301, Plant, Microbial and Insect Germplasm Conservation. The research is accomplished through a Specific Cooperative Agreement with Mississippi State University. The goal is to provide farmers with a profitable alternative crop to some of the crops currently grown in the region. Research supported by these funds is aimed at determining optimum agronomic practices for producing and harvesting kenaf and other alternative crops as well as to find new and profitable products made from kenaf fibers as well as other alternative crops. Prices for various crops being grown in the Mississippi Hill and Delta areas have been suppressed for the past 30 years and many farmers are finding it difficult to stay in business. Results from this research should enable many small to medium sized farmers to become profitable from growing and selling kenaf and/or kenaf based products as well as other alternative crops. 2. List the milestones (indicators of progress) from your Project Plan. Since research for this project is performed under a Specific Cooperative Agreement with Mississippi State University without ARS scientific contribution, the project has not undergone the formal ARS peer review process; therefore, formal milestones are not available. However, the overall objectives of the research are: to determine the agronomic, industrial, animal production, and economic potential of growing alternative crops or adding value to existing products in Mississippi. Alternative crops can be any plant or animal species that is not currently grown in Mississippi on a large scale and can include, but is not limited to, plants for medicinal purposes, (e.g., mayapple, eastern red cedar, Echinacea), etraceuticals (e.g., tomatoes with increased lycopene content), flowers for fresh market, ornamentals, turf, fiber crops (e.g., kenaf), oilseed, industrial crops for energy and alternative fuel production, etc. There are many ways to add value to existing crops or products such as 1) using a byproduct from a process, and 2) finding alternative uses or additives to plant and animal products. Specific research milestones are: (1) determine suitability of Winter Rose poinsettia as a cut flower crop; (2) evaluate incorporated and unincorporated rates of chicken litter as fertilizer for cotton production; (3) determine animal and economic performance of steers grazed on standing corn; (4) determine optimum planting time, mulching and soil conditions, harvest regimes, and pest pressure effects on Eastern Red Cedar and Mayapple to be used as medicinal herbs; and (5) quantify and improve lycopene production in Mississippi grown tomatoes and watermelons and evaluate the economic potential of the system. 3a List the milestones that were scheduled to be addressed in FY 2005. For each milestone, indicate the status: fully met, substantially met, or not met. If not met, why. 1. Establish field growing medicinal herbs and determine their potential for commercial production. Milestone Substantially Met 2. Evaluate production and yield of vegetable soybeans and chickpeas. Milestone Substantially Met 3. Establish a viable organic vegetable crop production site in Mississippi and determine organic vegetable yields and economics of production. Milestone Substantially Met 4. Evaluate corn grazing system for a dairy farm. Milestone Substantially Met 5. Evaluate rice flour and starch as an additive to low-fat chicken nuggets and frankfurters. Milestone Substantially Met 6. Determine if vetiver plant parts can be used in mulches to help control termites. Milestone Substantially Met 7. Increase lycopene concentration in commercial tomatoes grown in Mississippi. Milestone Substantially Met 8. Evaluate edible flowers as a potential Mississippi crop. Milestone Substantially Met 9. Evaluate raw soybean in swine diets to enhance reproductive efficiency in swine. Milestone Substantially Met 10. Evaluate the use of catfish by-products in the production of agronomic crops. Milestone Substantially Met 11. Evaluate fertilizer potential of chicken litter in no-till cotton production. Milestone Substantially Met 12. Evaluate field grown cut-flower production as an alternative crop in Mississippi. Milestone Substantially Met 13. Evaluate methods to increase value of under utilized pork through marination and packaging. Milestone Substantially Met 14. Evaluate cold and heat tolerance of aquatic plants for water garden culture. Milestone Substantially Met 3b List the milestones that you expect to address over the next 3 years (FY 2006, 2007, and 2008). What do you expect to accomplish, year by year, over the next 3 years under each milestone? 2006 1. Edible flowers have been placed in some local restaurants, information from these experiences will determine the acceptance and significance of the economic potential of the edible flowers. 2. Chicken litter as a supplement to commercial fertilizer in cotton production may provide an outlet for a waste product in Mississippi. 3. Identification and cultivation of medicinal herbs may develop into new alternative crops for Mississippi farmers. 4. Lycopene production should be optimized in some tomato varieties. 5. Production practices for several cut-flowers along with marketing strategies will be developed to provide an attractive alternative crop for Mississippi farmers. 2007 1. Determining if marination and packaging options may provide value- added markets for some under-priced cuts of pork. 2. Determining if utilizing rice flour and starch in low-fat chicken nuggets and frankfurters may produce a value-added product for the low- fat conscience public. 3. Determining if organic vegetable crop production could provide Mississippi truck farmers with good yields and be economically feasible. 2008 1. If catfish processing by-products can be used to supplement fertilizer requirements for row crops, a waste product will be utilized and commercial fertilizer usage can be reduced. 2. Determining if utilization of ground raw soybeans in the diets of young swine may increase their reproductive efficiency which would be another usage of soybeans and increase profits for swine producers. 3. Determine yield and potential value of growing vegetable soybean and chickpeas in Mississippi. 4a What was the single most significant accomplishment this past year? Increased omega-3 fatty acid in farm-raised catfish: Pond-raised channel catfish fed diets amended with specially processed and refined menhaden fish oil had omega-3 highly unsaturated fatty acid (HUFA) content of 7.2% of total lipid content in the fillets. The addition of this free fatty acid in ones diet could reduce the risk of heart disease, improve symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis and be useful in the prevention and treatment of many other diseases related to high cholesterol. Keeping the level of added fish oil to about 2.0 to 2.5%, the level of omega-3 HUFA content of fillets can be increased to at least 7.2% of total lipid content without affecting the traditional mild flavor of the catfish fillets. Consumption of 200 grams of fillet having 7.2% omega-3 HUFA and containing 6.9% total lipid can provide about one gram of omega-3 HUFA to ones normal diet. 4d Progress report. Chicken litter applied to no-till and tilled cotton production resulted in the same or higher yields per acre, while the differences were not big, the fact that a use for the waste product has been verified is significant. While analyzing tomatoes for lycopene concentration, two analytical procedures have been developed and/or refined that led to more rapid and lower cost alternatives than previously used. 5. Describe the major accomplishments over the life of the project, including their predicted or actual impact. Chicken litter can be used to reduce nematodes, to raise hay, and used a source of nitrogen to raise cotton both in the conventional and non- tillage systems. Sunflowers, zinnias, and celosia can be grown and marketed in Mississippi. The anti-cancer agent podophyllotoxin can be produced in Mayapple and Red Cedar and it appears that the lack of shade over the Mayapples increases podophyllotoxin production. Lycopene production is being optimized in tomatoes grown in Mississippi. These uses of kenaf, flowers, chicken litter, and other alternative or medicinal crops can be valuable resources for the Mississippi farmers looking for additional cash crops. A marinate solution and pre-cooking technique has been developed for beef pot roast and this system appears to have some commercial applications. Winter Rose poinsettias have been found to have a longer vase life, approximately two weeks or more, than most other cultivars thus, broken poinsettias or culled potted poinsettias have a good potential for sale as cut flower arrangements. It was also determined that consumers could be willing to pay up to $14. 00 for a six stem arrangement, therefore, this finding may add significant income to floriculture producers in Mississippi. A diet supplement of ground soybeans fed to gilts resulted in an advancement of 2025 days in the onset of estrus. This is an economically effective way to advance puberty while increasing the productivity of swine producers and an alternative market for soybean producers. Chicken litter applied to no-till and tilled cotton production resulted in the same or higher yields per acre, while the differences were not big, but the fact that a use for the waste product has been verified is significant. While analyzing tomatoes for lycopene concentration, two analytical procedures have been developed and/or refined that led to more rapid and lower cost alternatives than previously used. Pond-raised channel catfish were fed diets that were amended with specially processed and refined menhaden fish oil to boost the omega-3 highly unsaturated fatty acid (HUFA) content of the fillets. Keeping the level of added fish oil to about 2.0 to 2.5%, the level of omega-3 HUFA content of fillets can be increased to at least 7.2% of total lipid content without affecting the traditional mild flavor of the catfish fillets. Consumption of 200 grams of fillet having 7.2% omega-3 HUFA and containing 6.9% total lipid can provide about one gram of omega-3 HUFA to ones normal diet. 6. What science and/or technologies have been transferred and to whom? When is the science and/or technology likely to become available to the end- user (industry, farmer, other scientists)? What are the constraints, if known, to the adoption and durability of the technology products? A new kenaf variety Whitten was released and will be increased by a seed company in Mexico. The Swine Odor Reduction System (SORBS) has been tested at a commercial swine farm and is ready for production, we have had several companies asking about the patent for this system. A company is currently pursuing the technology for producing soilless sod which is produced using a mat made from woven kenaf bast fibers. The decorticator has been produced by a commerical machine shop and we have had inquires from several countries about its use and production. Several Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station (MAFES) bulletins have been written and distributed to producers and extension personnel. The potting media formulation was published in a trade journal for producers to utilize. Design criteria and guidelines for the use of the bio-filter will be released in the near future. We are also currently working with both agricultural and environmental companies that are interested in the biofiltration work. The pre-cooked pot roast project has been taken to a commercial meat packing company and they seem to be interested in the marination and pre- cooking techniques. 7. List your most important publications in the popular press and presentations to organizations and articles written about your work. (NOTE: List your peer reviewed publications below). Pollard, A.N., Coggins, P.C., Knight, P.R., Coker, C., Fain, G. 2004. Sensory evaluation of edible daylilies (Hemerocallis sp.). IFT Conference. Shankle, M.W., Tewolde, H., Garrett, T.F., Sistani, K.R.,A. Adeli, Rowe, D.E. 2005. Use of Poultry Litter as a Fertilizer Source in No-tillage Cotton Production. Beltwide Cotton Production Conferences. New Orleans, LA. Tewolde, H., Shankle, M.W., Garrett, T.F., Sistani, K.R., Rowe, D.E., Adeli, A. 2005. Lake of Incorporation Reduces Benefits of Poultry Litter Applied to No-till Cotton. Beltwide Cotton Production Conferences. New Orleans, LA. Hudson, D., Griffin, E. 2004. Market potential for Mississippi Grown cut flowers. Mississippi Agricultural & Forestry Experiments Station Bulletin 1140. Jerardo, A. 2004. Floriculture and Nursery Crops Outlook. USDA. FLO-03. Sept. 23, 2004. Evans, W.B., Solva, J., Holmes, W., Ingram, R., Hudson, P.M., Paridon, K. L. 2004. Studies on lycopene levels in Mississippi tomatoes. In 2004 Progress Report Summary of the Central Mississippi Research and Extension Center. Posadas, B.C., Posadas, R.A. 2004. Consumer preferences for post harvest processed raw oysters in coastal Mississippi. Final Report to the Gulf & South Atlantic Fisheries Foundation, Inc. Tampa, FL. 21pp. Evans, W.B., Paridon, K.L. 2004. Preliminary findings from Mississippis organic vegetable plot. HortSci. 39(3):656. (abstract) Pollard, A.N., Coggins, P.C., Knight, P.R., Coker, C., Fain, G. 2004. Sensory evaluation of edible daylilies (Hemerocallis sp.). HortSci. 39:783. Coker, C., Knight, P., Fain, G., Pollard, A., Coggins, P. 2004. Daylilies: Flower or Food? HortSci. 39:652-653. Knight, P.R., Coker, C., Fain, G., Pollard, A., Coggins, P. 2004. Consumer preferences for edible daylilies. Proc SNA Res. Conf. Williams, J. Byron. 2005. Comparison of fat replacer systems in low-fat ground beef patties. Journal of Muscle Foods. 111-05. Greer, L., Dole, J.M. 2005. Defoliation of woody cut stems with pre- harvest, less toxic chemical and postharvest environmental methods. HortTechnology. 15:376-380.

      Impacts
      (N/A)

      Publications