Source: RODALE INST RESEARCH CENTER submitted to
THE ROLE AND UTILIZATION OF MYCORRHIZAL FUNGI IN AGRICULTURE
Sponsoring Institution
Agricultural Research Service/USDA
Project Status
TERMINATED
Funding Source
Reporting Frequency
Annual
Accession No.
0408021
Grant No.
(N/A)
Project No.
1935-12000-010-03N
Proposal No.
(N/A)
Multistate No.
(N/A)
Program Code
(N/A)
Project Start Date
Jan 15, 2004
Project End Date
Jan 14, 2006
Grant Year
(N/A)
Project Director
DOUDS D D
Recipient Organization
RODALE INST RESEARCH CENTER
(N/A)
KUTZTOWN,PA 19730
Performing Department
(N/A)
Non Technical Summary
(N/A)
Animal Health Component
30%
Research Effort Categories
Basic
70%
Applied
30%
Developmental
0%
Classification

Knowledge Area (KA)Subject of Investigation (SOI)Field of Science (FOS)Percent
1020110110250%
1024020100050%
Goals / Objectives
The objective of this cooperative research project is to investigate the impacts of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi in agriculture and further explore the impacts of modern agricultural practices upon indigenuous AM fungi in soils of The Rodale Institute.
Project Methods
To investigate the impact of farming practices upon soil biological processes, particlarly the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis. To expand the work on the on-farm production of AM fungus inoculum to include studies of the utilization of this inoculum in crop production.

Progress 10/01/05 to 09/30/06

Outputs
Progress Report 4d Progress report. This report serves to document research progress under non-funded cooperative agreement 58-1935-4-413N. Additional details of this research can be found in the report for the parent CRIS 1935-12000-010- 00D Development of efficient and practical methods for producing arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. This agreement strengthens the working collaboration between the USDA-ARS Eastern Regional Research Center and The Rodale Institute to study the utility of AM fungi in agriculture. Several exploratory experiments were conducted utilizing arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus inoculum produced via the on-farm system for the field inoculation of sweet corn, winter wheat, and sweet potatoes. These experiments were inconclusive due to other management factors, notable failure to adequately control weeds in organic no-till systems. NP 202 Action Plan component V Productive and Sustainable Soil Management Systems, Performance Measures in the ARS Strategic Plan, 5.2.2 and 5.4.2).

Impacts
(N/A)

Publications


    Progress 01/15/04 to 01/14/06

    Outputs
    Progress Report Objectives (from AD-416) The objective of this cooperative research project is to investigate the impacts of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi in agriculture and further explore the impacts of modern agricultural practices upon indigenuous AM fungi in soils of The Rodale Institute. Approach (from AD-416) To investigate the impact of farming practices upon soil biological processes, particlarly the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis. To expand the work on the on-farm production of AM fungus inoculum to include studies of the utilization of this inoculum in crop production. Significant Activities that Support Special Target Populations This report serves to document research progress under non-funded cooperative agreement 58-1935-4-413N entitled "The Role and Utilization of Mycorrhizal Fungi in Agruculture." This agreement strengthens the working collaboration between the USDA-ARS Eastern Regional Research Center and The Rodale Institute to study the utility of arbuscular mycorrhizal [AM] fungi in agriculture and helps address Objective 2 of the project. Several exploratory experiments were conducted utilizing AM fungus inoculum produced via the on-farm system for the field inoculation of sweet corn, potatoes, garlic, and summer squash. These experiments await final harvest and analyses. Another long term experiment was initiated to eradicate AM fungi from a test plot by depriving them of host plants for several growing seasons via a bare fallow treatment. AM fungi will then be reintroduced to portions of the field to quantify the effects of the symbiosis upon crop growth and yield in the field. Activities are monitored by the ADODR via site visits and active participation. (NP 202 Action Plan component Understanding and Managing Soil Biology and Rhizosphere Ecology, Performance Measures in the ARS Strategic Plan, 5.2.2 and 5.4.2).

    Impacts
    (N/A)

    Publications


      Progress 10/01/04 to 09/30/05

      Outputs
      4d Progress report. This report serves to document research conducted under a Non-Funded Cooperative Agreement between ARS and the Rodal Institute Research Center. Additional details of this research can be found in the report for the parent CRIS 1935-12000-007-00D Monoxenic and Axenic Cultivation of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. This agreement strengthens the working collaboration between the USDA-ARS Eastern Regional Research Center and The Rodale Institute to study the utility of AM fungi in agriculture. The support position to work on this agreement was filled in August, 2004.

      Impacts
      (N/A)

      Publications


        Progress 10/01/03 to 09/30/04

        Outputs
        4. What were the most significant accomplishments this past year? D. Progress Report: This report serves to document research conducted under a Non-Funded Cooperative Agreement between ARS and the Rodale Institute. This agreement also services the SARE grant LNE 03-179, "On-farm production of mycorrhizal fungus inocula, awarded to D. Douds in 2003. Additional details of this research can be found in the report for the parent CRIS 1935-12000-007-00D Monoxenic and Axenic Cultivation of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal (AM). A core group of 6 farmers have been recruited to participate in a pilot project for the transfer of technology for the on- farm production and utilization of AM fungus inoculum. In the past year, inoculum was successfully produced at each farm. The inoculum production systems are being replicated in the current growing season. Inoculum produced last year is being used this year in a trial run for growing crops in the field. In addition, a major experiment was successfully conducted examining three composts, each at four dilution ratios, to enable farmers to more accurately predict the optimal dilution of compost with vermiculite given the nutrient analysis of their compost.

        Impacts
        (N/A)

        Publications