Source: EASTERN REGIONAL RES CENTER submitted to
ON-FARM PRODUCTION OF MYCORRHIZAL FUNGUS INOCULUM
Sponsoring Institution
Agricultural Research Service/USDA
Project Status
TERMINATED
Funding Source
Reporting Frequency
Annual
Accession No.
0407125
Grant No.
(N/A)
Project No.
1935-12000-010-01R
Proposal No.
(N/A)
Multistate No.
(N/A)
Program Code
(N/A)
Project Start Date
May 1, 2003
Project End Date
Dec 31, 2007
Grant Year
(N/A)
Project Director
DOUDS D D
Recipient Organization
EASTERN REGIONAL RES CENTER
(N/A)
WYNDMOOR,PA 19118
Performing Department
(N/A)
Non Technical Summary
(N/A)
Animal Health Component
30%
Research Effort Categories
Basic
70%
Applied
30%
Developmental
0%
Classification

Knowledge Area (KA)Subject of Investigation (SOI)Field of Science (FOS)Percent
1020110100050%
1024020110250%
Goals / Objectives
We propose to develop, refine, and transfer to farmers a new technology for "on-farm" production of AM fungus inocula.
Project Methods
We will supply six farmers with host plants pre-colonized with individual species/isolates of AM fungi and who will then transplant them into enclosures filled with compost diluted with vermiculite. The plants grow for one growing season during which the fungi proliferate as the roots grow throughout the media. The following spring, the farmer can then deliver it to the field as he/she would apply and incorporate compost, or mix it into potting media in which vegetable seedlings are grown for transplant to the field. Outplanting performance of inoculated and non-inoculated controls will be monitored, yields measured, and economic return of the technology calculated.

Progress 05/01/03 to 12/31/07

Outputs
Progress Report Objectives (from AD-416) We propose to develop, refine, and transfer to farmers a new technology for "on-farm" production of AM fungus inocula. Approach (from AD-416) We will supply six farmers with host plants pre-colonized with individual species/isolates of AM fungi and who will then transplant them into enclosures filled with compost diluted with vermiculite. The plants grow for one growing season during which the fungi proliferate as the roots grow throughout the media. The following spring, the farmer can then deliver it to the field as he/she would apply and incorporate compost, or mix it into potting media in which vegetable seedlings are grown for transplant to the field. Outplanting performance of inoculated and non- inoculated controls will be monitored, yields measured, and economic return of the technology calculated. Significant Activities that Support Special Target Populations This agreement services the Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education grant no. LNE 03-179, "On-farm production of mycorrhizal fungus inocula," awarded in 2003. This agreement was granted a no cost extension for calendar year 2007. This agreement contributes to Milestones of Objective 2 of the project. A core group of 6 farmers participated in a pilot project for the transfer of technology for the on-farm production and utilization of arbuscular mycorrhizal [AM] fungus inoculum. Inoculum was successfully produced at each farm in 2003 through 2006, and at two continuing participatory farms in 2007. Inoculum produced in 2005 was used in vegetable production systems in 2006 with success for the production of carrots, potatoes, and tomatoes. Recent work under this agreement addressed the need for a fertilizer regime and inoculum dosage for the growth of pepper and tomato seedlings well colonized by AM fungi during the greenhouse production phase. We found an inoculum level of 5-10% of the potting media by volume and watering with a nutrient solution containing 0.31 to 3.1 ppm phosphorus allowed the roots to become well colonized by AM fungi. Activities are monitored by the ADODR via site visits and active participation. (NP 202 Action Plan component Understanding and Managing Soil Biology and Rhizosphere Ecology, Performance Measures in the ARS Strategic Plan, 5.2.2 and 5.4.2).

Impacts
(N/A)

Publications


    Progress 10/01/06 to 09/30/07

    Outputs
    Progress Report Objectives (from AD-416) We propose to develop, refine, and transfer to farmers a new technology for "on-farm" production of AM fungus inocula. Approach (from AD-416) We will supply six farmers with host plants pre-colonized with individual species/isolates of AM fungi and who will then transplant them into enclosures filled with compost diluted with vermiculite. The plants grow for one growing season during which the fungi proliferate as the roots grow throughout the media. The following spring, the farmer can then deliver it to the field as he/she would apply and incorporate compost, or mix it into potting media in which vegetable seedlings are grown for transplant to the field. Outplanting performance of inoculated and non- inoculated controls will be monitored, yields measured, and economic return of the technology calculated. Significant Activities that Support Special Target Populations This report serves to document research progress under Cooperative Agreement 408-1935-186 with the University of Vermont. This agreement services the Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education grant no. LNE 03-179, ¿On-farm production of mycorrhizal fungus inocula,¿ awarded in 2003. This agreement was granted a no cost extension for calendar year 2007. Additional details of this research can be found in the report for the parent project 1935-12000-010-00D: Development of efficient and practical methods for producing arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. This agreement contributes to Milestones of Objective 2 of the project. A core group of 6 farmers participated in a pilot project for the transfer of technology for the on-farm production and utilization of arbuscular mycorrhizal [AM] fungus inoculum. Inoculum was successfully produced at each farm in 2003 through 2006. The inoculum production systems are being replicated in the current growing season at two of those farms. Inoculum produced in 2005 was used in vegetable production systems in 2006 with success for the production of carrots, potatoes, and tomatoes. Recent work under this agreement addressed the need for a fertilizer regime and inoculum dosage for the growth of pepper and tomato seedlings well colonized by AM fungi during the greenhouse production phase. We found an inoculum level of 5-10% of the potting media by volume and watering with a nutrient solution containing 0.31 to 3.1 ppm phosphorus allowed the roots to become well colonized by AM fungi. Activities are monitored by the ADODR via site visits and active participation. (NP 202 Action Plan component Understanding and Managing Soil Biology and Rhizosphere Ecology, Performance Measures in the ARS Strategic Plan, 5.2. 2 and 5.4.2).

    Impacts
    (N/A)

    Publications


      Progress 10/01/05 to 09/30/06

      Outputs
      Progress Report 4d Progress report. This report serves to document research progress under a Cooperative Agreement 408-1935-186 with the University of Vermont. This agreement services the Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education grant no. LNE 03-179, On-farm production of mycorrhizal fungus inocula, awarded to D. Douds in 2003. Additional details of this research can be found in the report for the parent CRIS 1935-12000-010-00D Development of efficient and practical methods for producing arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. A core group of 6 farmers participates in a pilot project for the transfer of technology for the on-farm production and utilization of AM fungus inoculum. Inoculum was successfully produced at each farm in 2003 through 2005. The inoculum production systems are being replicated in the current growing season. Inoculum produced in 2004 was used in vegetable production systems in 2005 with success for the production of carrots, potatoes, and strawberries. NP 202 Action Plan component V Productive and Sustainable Soil Management Systems, Performance Measures in the ARS Strategic Plan, 5.2.2 and 5.4.2).

      Impacts
      (N/A)

      Publications


        Progress 10/01/04 to 09/30/05

        Outputs
        4d Progress report. This report serves to document research conducted under a Reimbursable Cooperative Agreement between ARS and the University of Vermont. This agreement services the Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education grant no. LNE 03-179, On-farm production of mycorrhizal fungus inocula. Additional details of this research can be found in the report for the parent CRIS 1935-12000-007-00D Monoxenic and Axenic Cultivation of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. A core group of 6 farmers have been recruited to participate in a pilot project for the transfer of technology for the on-farm production and utilization of AM fungus inoculum. Inoculum was successfully produced at each farm in 2003 and 2004. The inoculum production systems are being replicated in the current growing season. Inoculum produced in 2003 was used in vegetable production systems in 2004 with little success due to poor record keeping among the farmers, insufficient communication, and poor colonization of seedlings prior to outplanting. These problems have been addressed and inocula produced in 2004 are being used this year in field experiments growing potatoes, tomatoes, peppers, and carrots. (Milestone 2E 48-54 months, NP 202 Action Plan component V Productive and Sustainable Soil Management Systems, Performance Measures in the ARS Strategic Plan, 5.2.2 and 5.4.2).

        Impacts
        (N/A)

        Publications


          Progress 10/01/03 to 09/30/04

          Outputs
          4. What were the most significant accomplishments this past year? D. Progress Report: This report serves to document research conducted under a Reimbursable Cooperative Agreement between ARS and the University of Vermont. This agreement services the Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education grant no. LNE 03-179, "On-farm production of mycorrhizal fungus inocula, awarded to D. Douds in 2003. Additional details of this research can be found in the report for the parent CRIS 1935-12000-007-00D Monoxenic and Axenic Cultivation of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal (AM) A core group of 6 farmers have been recruited to participate in a pilot project for the transfer of technology for the on-farm production and utilization of AM fungus inoculum. In the past year, inoculum was successfully produced at each farm. The inoculum production systems are being replicated in the current growing season. Inoculum produced last year is being used this year in a trial run for growing crops in the field. In addition, a major experiment was successfully conducted examining three composts, each at four dilution ratios, to enable farmers to more accurately predict the optimal dilution of compost with vermiculite given the nutrient analysis of their compost.

          Impacts
          (N/A)

          Publications