Source: UNIV OF MINNESOTA submitted to
DROUGHT STRESS TOLERANCE IN MINNESOTA
Sponsoring Institution
Agricultural Research Service/USDA
Project Status
TERMINATED
Funding Source
Reporting Frequency
Annual
Accession No.
0406978
Grant No.
(N/A)
Project No.
6645-21220-008-13S
Proposal No.
(N/A)
Multistate No.
(N/A)
Program Code
(N/A)
Project Start Date
Feb 1, 2003
Project End Date
Apr 30, 2005
Grant Year
(N/A)
Project Director
CARTER JR T E
Recipient Organization
UNIV OF MINNESOTA
(N/A)
ST PAUL,MN 55108
Performing Department
AGRONOMY & PLANT GENETICS
Non Technical Summary
(N/A)
Animal Health Component
0%
Research Effort Categories
Basic
100%
Applied
0%
Developmental
0%
Classification

Knowledge Area (KA)Subject of Investigation (SOI)Field of Science (FOS)Percent
2031820100015%
2031820102010%
2031820108015%
2031820110315%
2041820108015%
2121820108010%
2124020116010%
9014099104010%
Goals / Objectives
To develop high yielding drought tolerant cultivars adapted to Minnesota and other midwestern U.S. environments.
Project Methods
Soybean germplasm will be screened to identify drought tolerance. Putative tolerant types will be verified. Genetics of the tolerance will be investigated. Drought tolerance genes, as found, will be transferred to adapted cultivars This work will be pursued in lab, greenhouse, and field studies.

Progress 02/01/03 to 04/30/05

Outputs
4d Progress report. This report serves to document research conducted under a specific cooperative agreement between ARS and the University of Minnesota. Additional details of research can be found in the report for the parent project 6645-21220-008-00D, Increasing the competitive position of US soybeans in global markets through genetic diversity and plant breeding. August drought is Public Enemy No. 1 when it comes to soybean. There is no chemical to spray, no variety to select, and no crop rotation to follow which protects against drought. New drought tolerant soybean varieties are needed to solve this problem. Thus far, the commercial sector has made no progress in this area. The present project fills this void and develops the needed genetic materials for success. The program is national in scope, with Midwestern and Southern researchers working together to develop drought tolerant soybean. Two previous projects initiated this work. The earlier phases identified important drought tolerance traits and began applying them to practical breeding. The current project brings on line several exciting new technologies and materials including:1) development and testing of slow wilting breeding lines for Minn. derived from southern-maturity drought-tolerant germplasm, 2) identification of Midwestern maturity germplasm from Asia with drought tolerance, 3) discovery that slow wilting, drought tolerant southern germplasm is also slow wilting in the Midwest (i.e. drought genes work everywhere). Major activities for the last 12 months of this project (through April 2005) included preparation, planting and harvest of field trials and data analysis.

Impacts
(N/A)

Publications


    Progress 10/01/03 to 09/30/04

    Outputs
    4. What were the most significant accomplishments this past year? This report serves to document research conducted under a specific cooperative agreement between ARS and the University of Minnesota. Additional details of research can be found in the report for the parent project 6645-21220-008-00D(was 006 expired 6/2004), Increasing the competitive position of US soybeans in global markets through genetic diversity and plant breeding. August drought is Public Enemy No. 1 when it comes to soybean. There is no chemical to spray, no variety to select, and no crop rotation to follow which protects against drought. New drought tolerant soybean varieties are needed to solve this problem. Thus far, the commercial sector has made no progress in this area. The present project fills this void and develops the needed genetic materials for success. The program is national in scope, with Midwestern and Southern researchers working together to develop drought tolerant soybean. Two previous projects initiated this work. The earlier phases identified important drought tolerance traits and began applying them to practical breeding. The current project brings on line several exciting new technologies and materials including:1) development and testing of slow wilting breeding lines for Minn. derived from southern-maturity drought- tolerant germplasm, 2) identification of Midwestern maturity germplasm from Asia with drought tolerance, 3) discovery that slow wilting, drought tolerant southern germplasm is also slow wilting in the Midwest (i.e. drought genes work everywhere). Major activities for this new project through July 2004 included preparation and planting of field trials, plot management, and note taking.

    Impacts
    (N/A)

    Publications