Source: USDA/ERS submitted to
FARM AND FARM-RELATED EMPLOYMENT
Sponsoring Institution
Economic Research Service/USDA
Project Status
TERMINATED
Funding Source
Reporting Frequency
Annual
Accession No.
0406306
Grant No.
(N/A)
Project No.
FAB 10
Proposal No.
(N/A)
Multistate No.
(N/A)
Program Code
(N/A)
Project Start Date
Oct 1, 2003
Project End Date
Sep 30, 2008
Grant Year
(N/A)
Project Director
Majchrowicz, T.
Recipient Organization
USDA/ERS
1800 M STREET NW
WASHINGTON,DC 20036
Performing Department
ECONOMIC RESEARCH SERVICE
Non Technical Summary
This project creates county-level data of estimates of farm and farm-related employment. These estimates, which are rich in geographic detail, provide valuable information about the importance of agriculture across the country.
Animal Health Component
100%
Research Effort Categories
Basic
0%
Applied
100%
Developmental
(N/A)
Classification

Knowledge Area (KA)Subject of Investigation (SOI)Field of Science (FOS)Percent
61050103010100%
Knowledge Area
610 - Domestic Policy Analysis;

Subject Of Investigation
5010 - Food;

Field Of Science
3010 - Economics;
Keywords
Goals / Objectives
This project creates county-level data of estimates of farm and farm-related employment. These estimates, which are rich in geographic detail, provide valuable information about the importance of agriculture across the country.
Project Methods
The estimates are derived by combining farm employment data from the Bureau of Economic Analysis with an enhanced file of the Census Bureau's County Business Patterns. Farm and farm-related industries are generally identified as those with 50 percent or more of their national workforce employed in providing goods and services necessary to satisfy the final demand for agricultural products. These industries include farm production, processing and marketing of agricultural goods, and agricultural wholesale and retail trade. The data will be provided for the United States, individual States, Farm Production Regions, and Farm Resource Regions from 1981 to 2000. The data tables may be available on the ERS website, and the entire raw data file may also be downloaded. A major component of the project is the developing a relation between SIC to NAICS industry codes.

Progress 10/01/03 to 09/30/08

Outputs
Over the course of this project, updates were made twice to an ERS database of employment in farm and farm-related industriesâ¿¿once based on 1997 data and again with data through 2000. Estimates are derived by combining farm employment data from the Bureau of Economic Analysis with an enhanced file of the Census Bureau's County Business Patterns. The Farm and Farm-Related Employment data is available on the ERS website, which provides estimates for 1981-2000. The project was completed with an update to the Labor Chapter contained in the Rural Labor and Education Briefing Room on the ERS website.

Impacts
Farming and its related industries provided 25.8 million jobs, or about 15.6 percent of total U.S. employment in 2000. Farm production employment, which includes farm proprietors and hired farmworkers, provided 3.1 million jobs. Agricultural services, forestry, and fishing employed 479,000 workers. Agricultural input industries, including farm machinery and equipment manufacturing, provided over 477,000 jobs. Agricultural processing and marketing industries, which prepare agricultural products after they leave the farm, contributed more than 2.8 million jobs. Industries peripherally related to farmingâ¿¿wholesale and retail trade of agricultural products (18.3 million jobs) accounted for the largest share of farm and farm-related employment. Agricultural wholesale and retail trade industries account for about two-thirds of farm and farm-related employment, but farm production remains an important source of rural jobs in specific geographic areas. The Rural Labor and Education Briefing Room update finds that hired farmworkers make up less than 1 percent of all U.S. wage and salary workers, but they make a major contribution to agriculture by providing labor during critical production periods. Yet, hired farmworkers continue to be one of the most economically disadvantaged groups in the United States. Hired farmworkers are employed in both metro and nonmetro areas. The statistics presented in this chapter, therefore, refer to farmworkers nationwide rather than in nonmetro areas only.

Publications


    Progress 10/01/03 to 09/30/04

    Outputs
    Preparations are being made to add 2001-02 data to the database.

    Impacts
    (N/A)

    Publications