Source: CONNECTICUT AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION submitted to
AQUATIC WEED MANAGEMENT
Sponsoring Institution
Agricultural Research Service/USDA
Project Status
TERMINATED
Funding Source
Reporting Frequency
Annual
Accession No.
0405844
Grant No.
(N/A)
Project No.
6629-22000-009-01S
Proposal No.
(N/A)
Multistate No.
(N/A)
Program Code
(N/A)
Project Start Date
Aug 1, 2002
Project End Date
Jul 31, 2007
Grant Year
(N/A)
Project Director
RAYAMAJHI M B
Recipient Organization
CONNECTICUT AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION
PO BOX 1106
NEW HAVEN,CT 06504
Performing Department
SOIL & WATER
Non Technical Summary
(N/A)
Animal Health Component
40%
Research Effort Categories
Basic
40%
Applied
40%
Developmental
20%
Classification

Knowledge Area (KA)Subject of Investigation (SOI)Field of Science (FOS)Percent
2160210113010%
2160210114020%
2160310101020%
2160310114010%
2162300108010%
2162300113020%
2162300114010%
Goals / Objectives
Determine diversity and distribution of aquatic weed species of importance to Connecticut. Prioritize weed species on which to concentrate based on their current or potential impact on Connecticut's waterways. Examine critically available weed management strategies for the key weed species. Propose new directions for biologically based, integrated management of these weed species.
Project Methods
An initial aquatic plant survey will be conducted, with a focus on the largest 50-60 lakes throughout Connecticut. Options for effective aquatic weed control include sediment removal, water level draw-down, harvesting, biological controls, bottom barriers, and herbicides. Other methods of control that need to be investigated include various biological controls, including grass carp and insects. It is noteworthy that the use and success of biological controls in Connecticut lakes is largely unknown. The specific method of control that will provide the greatest success is going to be highly lake-dependent but investigations will begin on the bodies of water identified with the worst infestations.

Progress 08/01/02 to 07/31/07

Outputs
Progress Report Objectives (from AD-416) Determine diversity and distribution of aquatic weed species of importance to Connecticut. Prioritize weed species on which to concentrate based on their current or potential impact on Connecticut's waterways. Examine critically available weed management strategies for the key weed species. Propose new directions for biologically based, integrated management of these weed species. Approach (from AD-416) An initial aquatic plant survey will be conducted, with a focus on the largest 50-60 lakes throughout Connecticut. Options for effective aquatic weed control include sediment removal, water level draw-down, harvesting, biological controls, bottom barriers, and herbicides. Other methods of control that need to be investigated include various biological controls, including grass carp and insects. It is noteworthy that the use and success of biological controls in Connecticut lakes is largely unknown. The specific method of control that will provide the greatest success is going to be highly lake-dependent but investigations will begin on the bodies of water identified with the worst infestations. Significant Activities that Support Special Target Populations This report serves to document research conducted under a reimbursable agreement between ARS and the Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station (CAES). Additional details of research can be found in the report in the parent project 6629-22000-009-00D, �Development & evaluation of biological control agents for invasive species threatening the Everglades & other natural and managed systems�. After an additional 22 lakes were surveyed this year, 126 lakes now have GPS-based bathymetric vegetation maps created and digitized. In addition, GPS-derived transects have been established within each lake or pond. These transects will serve as a diagnostic assessment tool to track changes in aquatic species abundance and distribution over time. Monitoring results show that more the 60% of the water bodies have been invaded by a non-native aquatic plant and many have multiple invasive species present. Chemical control studies continued at a number of lakes, including further investigations into the efficacy of late season herbicide applications. We have also begun investigating the potential of insect-based biological control of Eurasian watermilfoil. The Eurasian watermilfoil weevil (Euhrychiopsis lecontei) was found in all 15 lakes analyzed, with population densities in one lake approaching 1.2 insects/plant stem. CAES scientists sponsored several additional workshops that were open to the public and designed to train lake residents in the identification and management of non-native aquatic plant species. Additionally, a molecular-based identification system has been developed in which three separate genes are analyzed for each plant specimen. At least one gene has been sequenced and characterized for 56 plant species; all three genes have been successfully characterized for 36 species. ADODR monitored the activities and progress of the above mentioned research during 2006-2007 in two occasions through site visits in addition to the telephone calls and email communications.

Impacts
(N/A)

Publications


    Progress 10/01/05 to 09/30/06

    Outputs
    Progress Report 4d Progress report. This report serves to document research conducted under a reimbursable agreement between ARS and the Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station (CAES). Additional details of research can be found in the report in the parent project 662-22000-008D "Biological Control for Sustainable Management of Aquatic Weeds and Other Invasie Plants." Seventy-two lakes were surveyed and GPS-based underwater vegetation maps created and digitized. To date, a total of 104 lakes have GPS-based underwater vegetation maps. Presently, the survey results show that more the 60% of the water bodies have been invaded by at least one non-native aquatic plant and many are invaded by multiple invasive plants species. Chemical control studies continued at a number of lakes, including investigations into the efficacy of late season herbicide applications. In one lake, a novel technique involving an early season diquat treatment followed by longer-term fluridone applications was implemented. Additionally, CAES scientists sponsored three workshops designed to train lake residents to identify non-native aquatic plants. A molecular-based identification system has been developed where three separate genes are analyzed for each plant specimen. So far, 31 plant species have been sequenced and identified by these methods.

    Impacts
    (N/A)

    Publications


      Progress 10/01/04 to 09/30/05

      Outputs
      4d Progress report. This report serves to document research conducted under a reimbursable agreement between ARS and Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station. Additional details of research can be found in the report in the parent project 6629-22000-008-00D Biological Control of Sustainable of Aquatic Weeds and other Invasive Plants. GPS-based bathymetric vegetation maps showing the distributions of invasive and native plant species in 32 Connecticut lakes were created and digitized during the past year. Herbicides were used to treat aquatic weed infestations in a few of these lakes. Molecular genetics methods are also being developed to aid with identification of aquatic plant specices.

      Impacts
      (N/A)

      Publications


        Progress 10/01/03 to 09/30/04

        Outputs
        4. What were the most significant accomplishments this past year? This report serves to document research conducted under a specific cooperative agreement between ARS and the Connecticut Agricultural Experimental Station. Additional details of research can be found in the report for the parent project 6629-22000-008-00D Biological Control for Sustainable Management of Aquatic Weeds and Other Invasive Plants. Nearly 20 lakes in Connecticut have been surveyed and mapped with regard to overall aquatic vegetation, with a specific emphasis on invasive species such as milfoil (Myriophyllum species) and cabomba (Cabomba carliniana). A problematic region of Lake Quonnipaug that contained dense Cabomba was effectively controlled with liquid fluridone. In a small pilot study, we isolated the ribosomal RNA from milfoil and cabomba. The resulting sequences were verified and posted on GenBank, the National Institutes of Health genetic sequence database

        Impacts
        (N/A)

        Publications