Source: STATE OF HAWAII, DEPT OF AGRICULTURE submitted to
EXPLORATION FOR BIOLOGICAL CONTROL OF MELON FLY, BACTROCERA CUCURBITAE IN INDO-MALAYAN REGION
Sponsoring Institution
Agricultural Research Service/USDA
Project Status
TERMINATED
Funding Source
Reporting Frequency
Annual
Accession No.
0405088
Grant No.
(N/A)
Project No.
0500-00044-016-06S
Proposal No.
(N/A)
Multistate No.
(N/A)
Program Code
(N/A)
Project Start Date
Sep 28, 2001
Project End Date
Aug 31, 2006
Grant Year
(N/A)
Project Director
VARGAS R I
Recipient Organization
STATE OF HAWAII, DEPT OF AGRICULTURE
PO BOX 22159
HONOLULU,HI 96823
Performing Department
HAWAII DEPT OF AGRICULTURE
Non Technical Summary
(N/A)
Animal Health Component
75%
Research Effort Categories
Basic
0%
Applied
75%
Developmental
25%
Classification

Knowledge Area (KA)Subject of Investigation (SOI)Field of Science (FOS)Percent
2110920113010%
2111030113010%
2111040113010%
2111099113010%
2111420113020%
2111421113010%
2111429113010%
2111460113020%
Goals / Objectives
Obtain baseline data on population density, distribution, and levels of field parasitization in wild & cultivated Cucurbitaceae & other hosts of melon fly; exploration in native region of melon fly (Thailand & neighbor countries) for biological control agents; importation of biocontrol agents into State HDOA Quarantine facility, determination of biological attributes & establishment of host suitability tests & response to non-target tephritids; develop methods for mass-rearing & release of parasitoids.
Project Methods
1) Surveys of wild and cultivated host plants will be conducted on major Hawaiian Islands. 2) Exploration of Thailand and surrounding areas will be conducted to identify potential natural enemies for introduction into Hawaii. 3) Promising natural enemies will be shipped to the Quarantine Facility in Honolulu for mass-rearing, host testing, and release. Documents SCA with State of HI Dept. of Agriculture. Formerly 0500-00044-007-07S, 03/2005.

Progress 09/28/01 to 08/31/06

Outputs
Progress Report 4d Progress report. This report documents research conducted under a specific cooperative agreement # 58-5320-1-0530, between ARS and the State of Hawaii. Additional details of research can be found in the report for the parent CRIS 0500-00044-016-00D, Areawide Management of Fruit Flies in Hawaii. We finished the host specificity tests for Aganaspis daci. We found that this parasitoid is not suitable for Bactrocera cucurbitae as is recorded in literature. About 95% of the eggs are encapsulated in melon fly hosts. It is not an efficient parasitoid for Bactrocera dorsalis where 50% of the eggs are encapsulated. However, Bactrocera latifrons proved to be the most vulnerable of the four tephritid species in Hawaii and can be used as an optimum host for mass production. This parasitoid can add to the control of Ceratitis capitata and B. latifrons in the field. Studies on Aganaspis daci can direct our efforts to use this species against the solanaceous fruit fly in Hawaii. Data obtained on the bionomics and rearing methods of A. daci are important for biocontrol programs against Bactrocera zonata and C. capitata elsewhere. A number of talks have been presented at various meetings based on our results.

Impacts
(N/A)

Publications


    Progress 10/01/04 to 09/30/05

    Outputs
    4d Progress report. This report serves to document research conducted under a specific cooperative agreement between ARS and the Hawaii Department of Agriculture. Additional details of research can be found in the report for the parent project 0500-00044-016-00D Areawide Pest Management of Fruit Flies in Hawaii. Host range studies and methods for mass rearing the larval-pupal parasitoid, Aganaspis daci (Hymenoptera: Eucoilidae) were investigated under quarantine conditions. A colony of this parasitoid was established in the Hawaii Department of Agriculture Quarantine Facility from a field- collected cohort introduced from Greece in November 2003. The parasitoid was found to successfully develop in Ceratitis capitata, Bactrocera dorsalis, B. latifrons, and B. cucurbitae. Insectary rearing was best achieved by enclosing pairs of newly eclosed adults in containers provided with the host larvae in its media. The parasitoid females penetrated the media and effectively located the host larvae for egg laying. The most efficient parasitoid-host ratios that produce the highest yield of parasitoid progeny were determined to facilitate parasitoid mass production. Parasitism of late instar B. cucurbitae produced fewer parasitoid progeny than other tephritid hosts, and B. latifrons was the best host for insectary rearing. Studies on the non-target effects of A. daci showed that female parasitoids had negative responses to the flower-head feeders and gall- forming tephritids. A final report is in progress for obtaining release permits from quarantine for field evaluations. A second exploratory trip is being planned to survey Southeastern Asia during August November 2005, shortly after the heavy raining season. The northern provinces of Laos, Thailand, and Myanmar are targeted for this upcoming survey.

    Impacts
    (N/A)

    Publications


      Progress 10/01/03 to 09/30/04

      Outputs
      4. What were the most significant accomplishments this past year? This report serves to document research conducted under a specific cooperative agreement between ARS and the Hawaii Department of Agriculture. Additional details of research can be found in the report for the parent project 0500-00044-007-00D Areawide Integrated Pest Management of Fruit flies in Hawaiian Fruits and Vegetables. Population densities of the melon fly were studied. The only natural enemy found was the larval endoparasitoid Psyttalia fletcheri (Silvestri). The highest level of melon fly infestation and parasitism was obtained from bitter melon, Momordica charantia, where parasitism by P. fletcheri reached up to 12% during September 2002. Parasitism in the wild host Coccinia grandis was 14.5 % by the same parasitoid. Additional host range tests indicate Aganaspis daci (Weld) (Hymenoptera: Eucoilidae), a solitary larval parasitoid, is able to develop successfully on the four tephritid pest species in Hawaii with some degree of host resistance from mature third instar Bactrocera cucurbitae.

      Impacts
      (N/A)

      Publications