Source: CANAAN VALLEY INSTITUTE submitted to
IMPROVING AQUACULTURE IN THE MID ATLANTIC HIGHLANDS
Sponsoring Institution
Agricultural Research Service/USDA
Project Status
TERMINATED
Funding Source
Reporting Frequency
Annual
Accession No.
0404961
Grant No.
(N/A)
Project No.
1930-32630-001-01G
Proposal No.
(N/A)
Multistate No.
(N/A)
Program Code
(N/A)
Project Start Date
Sep 1, 2001
Project End Date
Aug 31, 2006
Grant Year
(N/A)
Project Director
HERSHBERGER W K
Recipient Organization
CANAAN VALLEY INSTITUTE
1 CREATIVE PLACE, NORTHGATE BUSINESS PARK
CHARLESTON,WV 25311
Performing Department
(N/A)
Non Technical Summary
(N/A)
Animal Health Component
50%
Research Effort Categories
Basic
0%
Applied
50%
Developmental
50%
Classification

Knowledge Area (KA)Subject of Investigation (SOI)Field of Science (FOS)Percent
3073719106065%
3083711116010%
6033799301025%
Goals / Objectives
The overall goal of this research is to identify the physical, natural resource, environmental and economic constraints to expanded, sustainable aquaculture production in the Mid-Atlantic Highlands of West Virginia. To accomplish this, the following objectives will be addressed: 1) A GIS model will be developed that incorporates data important to aquaculture production and integrate different layers of information to evaluate potential production constraints; 2) Water sources will be identified and assessed with respect their capacity to support production of fish that are free of mercury, and; 3) Econometric information will be appraised for its impact on aquaculture production.
Project Methods
Objective 1 requires the development of a knowledge base and a database of pertinent information relative to aquaculture information in the Mid-Atlantic Highlands. Water quality and quantity data will be collected on known water supplies and undiscovered water supplies will be identified via new technology (Light Detection and Ranging LIDAR) and used, along with data other critical aquaculture factors, to evaluate locations for aquaculture production. Objective 2 will be addressed via water quality analysis, fish analysis and geospatial risk analysis to evaluate the potential for raising mercury-free fish. Objective 3 will involve gathering data from a case-study of a fish processing facility and analysis of this information in conjunction with the previously developed geospatial model to evaluate the impacts of market and other distribution factors on the West Virginia aquaculture industry.

Progress 10/01/05 to 09/30/06

Outputs
Progress Report 1. What major problem or issue is being resolved and how are you resolving it (summarize project aims and objectives)? How serious is the problem? Why does it matter? In year four of this project (FY 2006) the primary objective of this project was to promote an aquaculture industry in West Virginia (WV). WV has a plethora of water resources adequate for aquaculture, especially in the karst topography regions, and in juxtaposition with small farmers struggling to maintain an agricultural lifestyle. Hence, Canaan Valley Institute (CVI) endeavored to explore the challenges and opportunities in the development of aquaculture industry. The principal problems or challenge to the development of sustainable small business fish growers in West Virginia appeared to be related to inadequate access to markets and scale of operations. To address these problems, CVI partnered with West Virginia University to develop geospatial-models to determine: 1) Optimal shipment patterns for WV fish growers 2) Optimal fish supply patterns to WV processing plants 3) Optimal location and production capacities of processing plants in WV Furthermore, based on modeling results, CVI made strategic investments in fish processing in Parsons, WV. This 5-Forks fish processing plant was to be used to validate model results with real-world scenarios in bringing more fish to market. This project was aligned with NP #106 under the Sustainability and Environmental Compatibility of Aquaculture research component. 2. List by year the currently approved milestones (indicators of research progress) 1) Design of an integrated systems simulation model that would explicitly define interrelationships among pertinent physical, social, and economic system variables. 2) Outreach to the aquaculture community in order to obtain real-world input and feedback for the GIS database and the simulation model. 3) Testing of the systems model through a pilot study to parameterize and validate the model development. 4b List other significant research accomplishment(s), if any. Title: Aquaculture Systems Analysis Models, Applications, and Implications for Aquaculture Development in the Mid-Atlantic Highlands Three optimization models were developed using the Generalized Algebraic Modeling System (GAMS) software package. The first model allows estimation of the optimal shipment patterns for WV fish growers and optimal fish supply patterns for WV processing plants. Optimal patterns are defined as the shipments from each grower to each market within the boundaries of the state that maximizes total profits in the WV aquaculture industry. Two types of markets are considered: recreational and the food market. The recreational market includes sales through own fee-fishing sites, and sales for stocking. The food market includes sales to processing plants. The second model focuses on interactions among industry participants and their effect on prices and profitability of individual fish growers. We model price competition among producers for supply to various market outlets state-wide. Such factors as production cost, location relative to the outlets, and proximity to other competitors influence profitability and, ultimately, survival of individual producers. The third model was developed to help analyze optimal location and capacities of processing plants. The location and processing volume are defined as optimal if the total profits of WV growers and processing plants are maximized. The model relies on various assumptions including that sales to recreational markets are fixed. The models were estimated using data from previous aquaculture economics studies conducted at WVU; a joint CVI-WVU grower data base; and a WVU Extension Service database. We considered alternative scenarios of processing industry development in the state (i.e., the number of processing plants and their maximum production capacities), and alternative transportation cost structures. The results are summarized in two working papers (available through the web), and have been presented at several scientific conferences. A manuscript of a paper with research results has been submitted to a peer-reviewed journal. 4d Progress report. This report serves to document research conducted under a Specific Cooperative Agreement between ARS and the Canaan Valley Institute in Davis, WV. Additional details of research can be found in the report for the parent CRIS 1930-32630-001-00D, Improving Aquaculture in the Mid- Atlantic Highlands. 6. What science and/or technologies have been transferred and to whom? When is the science and/or technology likely to become available to the end- user (industry, farmer, other scientists)? What are the constraints, if known, to the adoption and durability of the technology products? Please see http://www.caf.wvu.edu/resm/faculty/borisova/FishTransAsst.htm. This software (website) was intended to be used by policy makers and existing/potential growers. The site has been accessed by 23 visitors since February 2006. 7. List your most important publications in the popular press and presentations to organizations and articles written about your work. (NOTE: List your peer reviewed publications below). Borisova T., G. DSouza, and K. Semmens. 2004. Economic analysis of hybrid bluegill production in WV. RESM Working Paper 04-09, http://www. cafcs.wvu.edu/resm/PDF/RESMWP-0409.pdf Borisova T. and G. DSouza. 2006. Remaining Competitive at the Regional Level: Developing a Local Aquaculture Industry. Aquaculture America 2006, special session: Remaining Competitive in Global Economy. Aquaculture America Conference in Las Vegas, Nevada, February 13-16, 2006. Borisova T., K. Semmens, G. DSouza. 2005. Economic analysis of production of female green sunfish x male bluegill hybrids in West Virginia Paper presented at Aquaculture America 2005, New Orleans, LA, Jan. 15 20, 2005, http://www.was.org/meetings/AbstractData.asp?AbstractId=7778 Borisova T., P. Vantaram, G. DSouza, D. Miller, and J. Evans. 2006. Web-Based Decision Support Tool For Fish Transportation Analysis, v. 2. WV Aquaculture Forum, Jan 21, 2006, WVU Jacksons Mill Center for Lifelong Learning, Weston, WV Borisova T., P. Vantaram, G. DSouza, D. Miller, and C. Zabriskie. 2005. Web-Based Decision Support Tool For Fish Transportation Analysis. WV Aquaculture Forum, Jacksons Mill, Weston, WV, January 15, 2005.

Impacts
(N/A)

Publications


    Progress 09/01/01 to 08/31/06

    Outputs
    Progress Report Objectives (from AD-416) The overall goal of this research is to identify the physical, natural resource, environmental and economic constraints to expanded, sustainable aquaculture production in the Mid-Atlantic Highlands of West Virginia. To accomplish this, the following objectives will be addressed: 1) A GIS model will be developed that incorporates data important to aquaculture production and integrate different "layers" of information to evaluate potential production constraints; 2) Water sources will be identified and assessed with respect their capacity to support production of fish that are free of mercury; and 3) Econometric information will be appraised for its impact on aquaculture production. Approach (from AD-416) Objective 1 requires the development of a knowledge base and a database of pertinent information relative to aquaculture information in the Mid- Atlantic Highlands. Water quality and quantity data will be collected on known water supplies and undiscovered water supplies will be identified via new technology (Light Detection and Ranging � LIDAR) and used, along with data other critical aquaculture factors, to evaluate locations for aquaculture production. Objective 2 will be addressed via water quality analysis, fish analysis and geospatial risk analysis to evaluate the potential for raising mercury-free fish. Objective 3 will involve gathering data from a case-study of a fish processing facility and analysis of this information in conjunction with the previously developed geospatial model to evaluate the impacts of market and other distribution factors on the West Virginia aquaculture industry. Significant Activities that Support Special Target Populations This report serves to document research conducted under an Assistance Type Cooperative Agreement between the Canaan Valley Institute and ARS. Additional details of research can be found in the report for the in- house associated project entitled, "Integrated Management of Land and Water Resources for Environmental and Economic Sustainability in the Northeast U.S." (1902-13000-011-00D). The ADODR maintains frequent contact with the cooperator through phone calls, email, and annual site visits in addition to receipt of written reports. Accomplishments Trout Farm Production Optimization. A study was conducted to compare production management of a small trout farm operation to industry standards with respect to fish health and production efficiency. Specifically, health and productivity indices were defined and tracked for four months and historical sales data were analyzed in a systematic fashion. Growth rates were observed to be below expected values and mortality rates were higher than average. Although the farm had a very broad customer base and prices received were above national averages, opportunities to increase sales were apparent. The production system was determined to be overloaded, a reduction in fish densities would likely lead to improvements in growth rates, feed efficiencies, and mortality losses. It was also determined that improved record keeping would facilitate access to information necessary to assess both current conditions and the economic effectiveness of any management changes. Aquaculture Systems Analysis - Implications for the Mid-Atlantic Highlands. The goal of this study was to provide a scientific basis for market development, modeling, outreach and tool development in support of existing and potential Mid-Atlantic regional aquaculture. As a result, three optimization models were developed allowing estimations of optimal shipment patterns for WV fish growers and processing plants. A web-based decision support tool called "Fish Transportation and Profitability Assistant" (FISH TRAN) was developed to assist farmers in determining profits based on price, distance to market, production and transportation costs.

    Impacts
    (N/A)

    Publications


      Progress 10/01/04 to 09/30/05

      Outputs
      1. What major problem or issue is being resolved and how are you resolving it (summarize project aims and objectives)? How serious is the problem? What does it matter? Canaan Valley Institute (CVI) has made the strategic decision to support small-scale fish producers throughout the Mid-Atlantic Highlands (MAH). Such farmers face several constraints, including insufficient water quality, lack of certification for interstate distribution, lack of veterinary services, poor market acceptance of certain fish products, and low efficiencies of scale in production and distribution. To support the ARS national Aquaculture Program objectives, CVI will conduct relevant basic and applied research and technology transfer that will improve the sustainability of aquaculture and create jobs and economic activity, primarily in rural areas. To accomplish this, CVI will initiate an applied research program consisting of four components: 1) Construction of a comprehensive GIS database featuring thematic data layers relevant to aquaculture in the Mid-Atlantic Highlands; 2) Design of an integrated systems simulation model that would explicitly define interrelationships among pertinent physical, social, and economic system variables; 3) Outreach to the aquaculture community in order to obtain real-world input and feedback for the GIS database and the simulation model. 4) Testing of the systems model through a pilot study to parameterize and validate the model development. CVI cannot quantify the severity of the problem relative to the rest of the country. However, several requests for help from small producers in the Mid-Atlantic Highlands, on issues such as: identifying markets for their products, tailoring their production to maximize the return on investment and defining the technical aspects of production, processing and marketing that they cannot identify on their own, demonstrates that there is a problem with the regional industry in its present state. The Mid-Atlantic Highlands aquaculture industry has the potential to become viable. In the process, it could create jobs and supplemental income for traditional farmers. 2. List the milestones (indicators of progress) from your Project Plan. 1. Initiate GIS database development, and determine the geographic area to be investigated. 2. Determine the existing and potential capability of established growers in the study area and the potential for new growers. 3. Determine the market potential for species currently being farmed, for potential candidate species, and possible value-added products. 4. Determine the viability of the existing production, processing and distribution industry. For example, growth, feed and revenue curves for a rainbow trout producer participating in a partial budget study with FWI on the effect of density reduction on gill disease outbreaks will be completed. 5. Determine to what extent changes to the regional industry might make it more profitable. FWI/CVI: Collaboration 6. The project to optimize production at the mid-Atlantic Highlands trout farm will be completed. Results and recommendations will be transferred to the producer and manuscripts will be submitted for publication. 7. The project to assay water supplies for F. branchiophilum will be completed. Results will be transferred to producers and a manuscript will be submitted for publication Year 2: 1. Based on a comprehensive plan conceptualize the initial simulation model and acquire expertise to build it. 2. Refine GIS data based on information gaps obtained during the collection phase. 3. Develop a simulation model for viable aquaculture industry. 4. Initiate a pilot program to test the simulation model generated by CVI. Year 3: 1. Use the simulation model to modify the existing sales and distribution network towards achieving maximum profit margin for growers. 2. Expand production capabilities for existing growers, and incorporate new technology developments, based on projections from the simulation model. 3. Assess validity of simulation model and refine it based upon pilot program results. 4. Explore potential for replicating model to other parts of the country, and Agriculture or forest related products. 5. Fully integrate GIS database with simulation modeling. 3a List the milestones that were scheduled to be addressed in FY 2005. For each milestone, indicate the status: fully met, substantially met, or not met. If not met, why. 1. The milestones listed above for FY 2005 are listed under year 3. Testing the assumptions built into the simulation model is underway in the form of a pilot program which CVI is conducting using the former MA&PA processing facility in Parsons. CVI anticipates that the knowledge gained from this experience will help support the assumptions on supply, stocking rates, transportation costs and farm production and profitability numbers. The 4th milestone has not yet been explored since the model for West Virginia has not been completed and the research direction for CVI has been redirected due to a change in priorities. The same holds true for the 5th milestone. Milestone Not Met Redirection of Research focus due to change in priorities 3b List the milestones that you expect to address over the next 3 years (FY 2006, 2007, and 2008). What do you expect to accomplish, year by year, over the next 3 years under each milestone? The Project Plan for this CRIS is currently being peer-reviewed by the Office of Scientific Quality Review (OSQR). The review has not been completed and the proposed work has not been accepted; however, the milestones planned will continue and expand the GIS research with a goal of defining situations in the Mid-Atlantic Highlands of WV where mercury- free fish can be raised for market. 4a What was the single most significant accomplishment this past year? Web-Based Tools: We have completed a software tool ("FishTran") that facilitates estimation of the maximum distance for which it is profitable to transport fish for sale (i.e., market radius). The algorithm for estimation of the market radius was developed and implemented using an Excel spread sheet. We used Java Script to develop a user-friendly interface for this tool, and have placed it on the web to enable it to be easily accessible to clientele groups such as extension specialists, non- profit organizations, and individual producers or processors. 4b List other significant accomplishments, if any. CVI has developed a "clickable map" of the WV aquaculture industry for placement on the web. A user can click on any grower/fee fishing/processor/distributor location on the map and obtain information such as location, amenities, and species or products about individual producers and processors. Details about the businesses were obtained from the WVU Extension Service web page and other publicly-available sources. The idea is to provide existing and potential customers with updated information about fee-fishing locations and aquaculture-related products, in the process enhancing business sales and enabling industry growth. Industry-Level Analysis: Following the development of producer-level and processor-level optimization models, and as a prelude to conducting a systems analysis, we have initiated a comprehensive industry-level analysis of the WV aquaculture sector. The objective of this analysis is to analyze the supply-demand interactions among industry participants, and to determine the factors that could limit the industry growth. We are utilizing an economic modeling approach to analyze the factors determining profitability of fish production businesses, farm survival, and entry of new growers into the industry. The most significant accomplishment during FY 2005 has been the development of the pilot program designed to evaluate the validity of the assumptions built into the design of the simulation and transportation models. CVI has embarked upon the pilot program by leasing the former MA&PA facility in Parsons, which it will use for preparing a series of value added fish products for the marketplace. The research gained from this initiative will allow CVI to support the economic assumptions built into the model 4c List any significant activities that support special target populations. Operation of the fish-processing plant in Parsons, WV, will make additional accessible food fish processing capacity available to West Virginia fish farmers. 4d Progress report. This report documents research conducted under an Assistance type Cooperative Agreement between ARS and the Canaan Valley Institute. Additional details of research can be found in the report for the parent CRIS 1930-32630-001-00D, Improving Aquaculture in The Mid-Atlantic Highlands. In order to fully evaluate the assumptions built into the model, CVI has agreed to lease the fish processing facility, formerly owned by Mountain Aquaculture and Producers Association (MA&PA) from PRO (Parsons Revitalization Organization), a non-profit organization whose mission is to create jobs in rural communities. The processing facility will allow CVI to test the assumptions into the model by researching the market acceptance for specialty products made from farmed West Virginia fish. The GIS based simulation model for the State of West Virginia is in the process of being completed. Specific matrixes related to defining production, transportation, market costs and expenses are being built and will accompany the model. The transportation matrix, which has been completed, will help define the costs associated with trucking live or processed fish from a producer or processor to an end user. This analysis is in spread sheet form and will be made available to farmers and processors on the web or in software form. The collaboration between CVI and the Freshwater Institute to conduct the production optimization study and the Bacterial Gill Disease analysis has been completed. 5. Describe the major accomplishments over the life of the project, including their predicted or actual impact. CVI's aquaculture program will yield several useful products: A comprehensive and coupled GIS database/simulation model of aquaculture systems in a sub-region of the Mid-Atlantic Highlands, designed and parameterized to reflect existing conditions Education and Awareness programs for both aquaculture producers, as well as potential consumers GIS-based website for product marketing and tech transfer A specialized market study for products from small-scale fish farms and for value-added products A decision tree (model or models) enabling small fish farmers to choose among alternate markets, species (including non-aquatic species), facilities, farming methods, transportation modes, product presentations, pricings, and other factors. Thus, a farmer would have a decision tool to optimize his or her total operation 7. List your most important publications in the popular press and presentations to organizations and articles written about your work. (NOTE: List your peer reviewed publications below). Borisova, T., P. Vantaram, B. D'Souza, D. Miller, and C. Zabriskie. 2005. "Web-Based Decision Support Tool for Fish Transportation Analysis." Selected paper, presented at the Aquaculture America conference, New Orleans, LA, January 17-20. Web-Based Tools: Borisova, T. and P. Vantaram. 2005. "FishTran: Fish Transportation and Profitability Analysis," Version 2. Available at: http://www.caf.wvu. edu/resm/faculty/borisova/FishTransAsst.htm. Borisova, T. and P. Vantaram. 2005. "The WV Trout Industry: A Clickable Map." Beta version. Available at: http://www.caf.wvu. edu/resm/faculty/borisova/WVTroutIndustryMap1.htm.

      Impacts
      (N/A)

      Publications


        Progress 10/01/03 to 09/30/04

        Outputs
        1. What major problem or issue is being resolved and how are you resolving it (summarize project aims and objectives)? How serious is the problem? What does it matter? Even though abundant natural resources appear to represent potential development opportunities across the Appalachian region, production figures indicate that the Mid-Atlantic Highlands has not participated in the general expansion of aquaculture in the U.S. Most of the aquaculture production in this part of the country is derived from small-scale fish producers. Such farmers face several constraints, including insufficient water quality, lack of certification for interstate distribution, lack of veterinary services, poor market acceptance of certain fish products, and low efficiencies of scale in production and distribution. To support the ARS National Aquaculture Program (106) objectives, CVI will conduct relevant basic and applied research and technology transfer that will improve the sustainability of U.S. aquaculture and create jobs and economic activity, primarily in rural areas. To accomplish this, CVI will initiate an applied research program consisting of four components: 1) Construction of a comprehensive GIS database featuring thematic data layers relevant to aquaculture in the Mid-Atlantic Highlands. 2) Design of an integrated systems simulation model that would explicitly define interrelationships among pertinent physical, social, and economic system variables. 3) Outreach to the aquaculture community in order to obtain real-world input and feedback for the GIS database and the simulation model. 4) Testing of the systems model through a pilot study to parameterize and validate the model development. CVI cannot quantify the severity of the problem relative to the rest of the country. However, several requests for help from small producers in the Mid-Atlantic Highlands, on issues such as: identifying markets for their products, tailoring their production to maximize the return on investment and defining the technical aspects of production, processing and marketing that they cannot identify on their own, demonstrates that there is a problem with the regional industry in its present state. The Mid-Atlantic Highlands aquaculture industry has the potential to become viable. In the process, it could create jobs and supplemental income for traditional farmers. 2. List the milestones (indicators of progress) from your Project Plan. Year 1, FY2003 1. Initiate GIS database development, and determine the geographic area to be investigated. 2. Determine the existing and potential capability of established growers in the study area and the potential for new growers. 3. Determine the market potential for species currently being farmed, for potential candidate species, and possible value-added products. 4. Determine the viability of the existing production, processing and distribution industry. For example, growth, feed and revenue curves for a rainbow trout producer participating in a partial budget study with FWI on the effect of density reduction on gill disease outbreaks will be completed. 5. Determine to what extent changes to the regional industry might make it more profitable. FWI/CVI: Collaboration 6. The project to optimize production at the mid-Atlantic Highlands trout farm will be completed. Results and recommendations will be transferred to the producer and manuscripts will be submitted for publication. 7. The project to assay water supplies for F. branchiophilum will be completed. Results will be transferred to producers and a manuscript will be submitted for publication Year 2, FY2004 1. Based on a comprehensive plan conceptualize the initial simulation model and acquire expertise to build it. 2. Refine GIS data based on information gaps obtained during the collection phase. 3. Develop a simulation model for viable aquaculture industry. 4. Initiate a pilot program to test the simulation model generated by CVI. Year 3, FY2005 1. Use the simulation model to modify the existing sales and distribution network towards achieving maximum profit margin for growers. 2. Expand production capabilities for existing growers, and incorporate new technology developments, based on projections from the simulation model. 3. Assess validity of simulation model and refine it based upon pilot program results. 4. Explore potential for replicating model to other parts of the country, and Agriculture or forest related products. 5. Fully integrate GIS database with simulation modeling. 3. Milestones: A. List the milestones that were scheduled to be addressed in FY 2004. How many milestones did you fully or substantially meet in FY 2004 and indicate which ones were not fully or substantially met, briefly explain why not, and your plans to do so. The milestones listed above for FY 2004 are listed under year 2. The 1st and 2nd milestones listed have been fully met. The 3rd and 4th are in the process of being completed. In particular milestone 3, the development of a simulation model, will be completed by the end of FY 2004. Milestone 4, the initiation of a pilot program to test the model, is an on-going effort and will continue over the next two fiscal years. This program consists of research targeted at the value added food marketing industry and is being conducted in an effort at determining the possibility of offering greater prices to farmers at the gate for live fish, if a market can be developed for value added products, warranting higher prices. B. List the milestones that you expect to address over the next 3 years (FY 2005, 2006, & 2007). What do you expect to accomplish, year by year, over the next 3 years under each milestone? FY 2005 1. Use the simulation model to modify the existing sales and distribution network towards achieving maximum profit margin for growers. 2. Expand production capabilities for existing growers, and incorporate new technology developments, based on projections from the simulation model. 3. Assess validity of simulation model and refine it based upon pilot program results. FY 2006 1. Fully integrate GIS database with simulation modeling. 2. Deliver model to farmers, processors and distributors in form which is easy to use and directly applicable to their industry. 3. Expand model to include surrounding states in the Mid-Atlantic Highlands, including Pennsylvania, Maryland and Virginia. FY 2007 1. Explore potential for replicating model to other parts of the country, and Agriculture or forest related products. 4. What were the most significant accomplishments this past year? A. Single most significant accomplishment during FY 2004: The most significant accomplishment during FY 2004 has been the successful completion of a rough draft of the GIS based simulation model which is being developed in collaboration with West Virginia University (WVU). This accomplishment is important since it is the first step towards the eventual completion of the model for the State of West Virginia, the first effort of its kind in the Mid-Atlantic Highlands, and should provide farmers in the region with a valuable tool towards defining a potential investment into the aquaculture business. B. Other significant accomplishment: One other major accomplishment for FY 2004 has been the successful completion of the BGD and production optimization project which Dr. Julie Bebak-Williams from the Freshwater Institute, under a contract agreement with CVI, had been working on over the last two fiscal years. C. Significant activities that support special target populations. None D. Progress Report: This report serves to document research conducted under a General Assistance type of Agreement between ARS and Canaan Valley Institute. In order to fully evaluate the assumptions built into the model, CVI has agreed to lease the fish processing facility, formerly owned by Mountain Aquaculture and Producers Association (MA&PA) from PRO (Parsons Revitalization Organization), a non-profit organization whose mission is to create jobs in rural communities. The processing facility will allow CVI to test the assumptions into the model by researching the market acceptance for specialty products made from farmed West Virginia fish. In the process, CVI will evaluate the economics behind for farmers selling fish into the food market versus the recreational market. The precise dates during which CVI will sign the proposed lease have not been confirmed due to certain legal obstacles related to MA&PA's bankruptcy proceedings. The GIS based simulation model for the State of West Virginia is in the process of being completed. Specific matrixes related to defining production, transportation, market costs and expenses are being built and will accompany the model. The transportation matrix, which has been completed, will help define the costs associated with trucking live or processed fish from a producer or processor to an end user. This analysis is in spread sheet form and will be made available to farmers and processors on the web or in software form. The collaboration between CVI and the Freshwater Institute towards the production optimization study and the Bacterial Gill Disease analysis has been completed. 5. Describe the major accomplishments over the life of the project, including their predicted or actual impact. A comprehensive and coupled GIS database/simulation model of aquaculture systems in a sub-region of the Mid-Atlantic Highlands, designed and parameterized to reflect existing conditions is being developed. Use of this model will lead to a prioritized list of constraints and research opportunities for the enhancement of aquaculture within the Mid-Atlantic Highlands. Further, a 'decision tree' (model or models) will be developed to enable small fish farmers to choose among alternate markets, species (including non-aquatic species), facilities, farming methods, transportation modes, product presentations, pricings, and other factors. Thus, a farmer would have a decision tool to optimize his or her total operation. This accomplishment addresses milestones 1-3 in FY2004 and also the Production Intensity goals under the program component of Aquaculture Production Systems in the National Aquaculture Program Action Plan. 7. List your most important publications in the popular press and presentations to organizations and articles written about your work. Borisova T., D'Souza G., Miller D. and C. Zabriskie. 2004. A Geographic Analysis of Marketing Strategies for WV Aquaculture Producers. Selected paper accepted for presentation at the 4th Southern Forestry and Natural Resource Management GIS Conference - SOFOR GIS 04, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, December 16-17, 2004. [Link to the conference: http://www. gactr.uga.edu/conferences/2004/Dec/16/CallforPapers.pdf]. 2 Departmental Working Papers: Borisova, T., G. D'Souza, D. Miller, and C. Zabriskie. Optimum Shipment Patterns for West Virginia Aquaculture Products-PART I: Growers. West Virginia University, Division of Resource Management Working Paper RESMWP- 04-01. June 2004. 31 pp. [http://www.cafcs.wvu. edu/resm/publications/RESMWP.html]. Borisova, T., G. D'Souza, D. Miller, and C. Zabriskie. Optimum Shipment Patterns for West Virginia Aquaculture Products-PART II: Processors. West Virginia University, Division of Resource Management Working Paper RESMWP- 04-02. June 2004. 30 pp. [http://www.cafcs.wvu. edu/resm/publications/RESMWP.html].

        Impacts
        (N/A)

        Publications