Source: UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS submitted to
HEALTH BENEFITS OF INTERACTING PHYTOCHEMICALS IN BROCCOLI
Sponsoring Institution
Agricultural Research Service/USDA
Project Status
TERMINATED
Funding Source
Reporting Frequency
Annual
Accession No.
0404746
Grant No.
(N/A)
Project No.
5450-51000-035-09S
Proposal No.
(N/A)
Multistate No.
(N/A)
Program Code
(N/A)
Project Start Date
Jun 1, 2001
Project End Date
May 31, 2006
Grant Year
(N/A)
Project Director
FINLEY J W
Recipient Organization
UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS
1901 South First Street, Suite A
CHAMPAIGN,IL 61820
Performing Department
AGRICULTURAL EXPER. STATION
Non Technical Summary
(N/A)
Animal Health Component
60%
Research Effort Categories
Basic
20%
Applied
60%
Developmental
20%
Classification

Knowledge Area (KA)Subject of Investigation (SOI)Field of Science (FOS)Percent
7011440101050%
7021440101050%
Goals / Objectives
The objective of this project will be to determine the health benefits of phytochemicals in vegetables such as broccoli. The project will concentrate on the interaction of glucosinolates and mineral elements. Strains of broccoli with high concentrations of glucosinolates will be grown to contain high concentrations of minerals and then fed to research animals and humans.
Project Methods
Specific strains of vegetables will be developed at the University of Illinois. These strains will be grown under specialized conditions at Illinois and at the Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center. Vegetables will be harvested and processed and mixed into diets for animals. Specific studies with animals will examine the cancer-reducing potential, the immune system-enhancing potential and the neuropsychological-enhancing function properties of these foods. Human studies will be conducted in normal populations in North America as well as in mineral-deficient populations abroad. Results of studies will be put into a format suitable for publication in a scientific journal.

Progress 06/01/01 to 05/31/06

Outputs
Progress Report 4d Progress report. This report serves to document research conducted under specific cooperative agreement between ARS and the University of Illinois, Department of Nutritional Sciences. Additional details of the research can be found in the report for the parent CRIS 5450-51000-035-00D. The Principal Investigator at the University of Illinois has an active research program examining the health benefits of glucosinolate compounds found in broccoli. She has collaborated with a plant breeder to develop different strains of broccoli with different concentrations of glucosinolates. Our work with broccoli has examined the health benefits of selenium that accumulates in broccoli grown under special high-Se conditions. This project joined these two lines of research and to determine whether the two compounds have any nutritional interaction. Selenium-enriched broccoli may be an excellent supplemental source of selenium because it contains chemical forms of selenium that protect against cancer but do not accumulate in the body as well as other forms of broccoli. A clinical study fed volunteers either 9 or 90 grams of broccoli either enriched or unenriched in selenium each day for 2 months. When compared to a similar study that fed subjects high-selenium wheat cereal, selenium from broccoli accumulated approximately 50% less than selenium from wheat, and more selenium from broccoli was excreted in the urine. These results support the hypothesis that selenium-enriched broccoli may supply cancer-inhibiting metabolites without inducing excessive accumulation in the body. In addition to results already published, any additional publications will be reported in the parent CRIS 5450-51000-035-00D.

Impacts
(N/A)

Publications

  • Hintze, K.J., Keck, A.S., Finley, J.W., Jeffery, EH. Induction of heptic thioredoxin reductase activity by sulforaphane, both in Hepalclc7 cells and in male Fisher 344 rats. Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry. 2003. 14:173-179.
  • Keck, A.S., Finley, J.W. Selenium (Se) enriched beef, wheat or broccoli or the salt selenate differ in the ability to increase thioredoxin reductase (TR) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) in rats. FASEB Journal. 2003. v.17: A1136.


Progress 10/01/04 to 09/30/05

Outputs
4a What was the single most significant accomplishment this past year? Selenium-enriched broccoli may be an excellent supplemental source of selenium because it contains chemical forms of selenium that protect against cancer but do not accumulate in the body as well as other forms of broccoli. A clinical study fed volunteers either 9 or 90 grams of broccoli either enriched or unenriched in selenium each day for 2 months. When compared to a similar study that fed subjects high-selenium wheat cereal, selenium from broccoli accumulated approximately 50% less than selenium from wheat, and more selenium from broccoli was excreted in the urine. These results support the hypothesis that selenium-enriched broccoli may supply cancer-inhibiting metabolites without inducing excessive accumulation in the body 4d Progress report. This report serves to document research conducted under a reimbursable agreement number 58-5450-1-0330 between ARS and the Department of Chemistry, University of North Dakota. Additional details of the research can be found in the report for the parent CRIS 5450-51000-035- 00D. The collaborator at the Univ. Of Illinois has an active research program examining the health benefits of glucosinolate compounds found in broccoli. She has collaborated with a plant breeder to develop different strains of broccoli with different concentrations of glucosinolates. Our work with broccoli has been examining the health benefits of selenium that accumulates in broccoli grown under special high-Se conditions. This project is designed to join these two lines of research and determine whether the two compounds have any nutritional interaction.

Impacts
(N/A)

Publications

  • Hintze, K.J., Keck, A.S., Finley, J.W., Jeffery, EH. Induction of heptic thioredoxin reductase activity by sulforaphane, both in Hepalclc7 cells and in male Fisher 344 rats. Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry. 2003. 14:173-179.
  • Keck, A.S., Finley, J.W. Selenium (Se) enriched beef, wheat or broccoli or the salt selenate differ in the ability to increase thioredoxin reductase (TR) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) in rats. FASEB Journal. 2003. v.17: A1136.


Progress 10/01/02 to 09/30/03

Outputs
4. What were the most significant accomplishments this past year? A. Single most significant accomplishment of 2003: A chemical found in broccoli, sulforaphane, may be protective against cancer by functioning as an anti-oxidant and reducing oxidative stress with a subsequent reduction in DNA damage. Cells grown in the presence or absence of sulforaphane were subjected to chemically-induced oxidative stress and damage to DNA was assessed by the COMET assay (a measure of DNA single strand breaks). Sulforaphane treatment resulted in decreased incidence of DNA strand breaks. These results indicate that some of the health benefits of broccoli may be a result of the antioxidant activity of sulforaphane preventing DNA damage. B. Other significant accomplishments: None. C. Special populations: None. D. Progress Report This report serves to document research conducted under a Specific Cooperative Agreement between ARS and Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Illinois. Additional details of the research can be found in the report for the parent CRIS 5450-51000-032-00D. The purpose of this Agreement is to study the nutritional benefits of broccoli consumption, concentrating especially on phytochemicals such as sulforaphane. Human and animal studies are being conducted at the GFHNRC, phytochemical analyses are being conducted at the University of Illinois. Additionally, a visiting scientist from Univ. Ill is working at the GFHNRC and is helping conduct the human and animal studies.

Impacts
(N/A)

Publications

  • Keck, A.S., Finley, J.W. Selenium (Se) enriched beef, wheat or broccoli or the salt selenate differ in the ability to increase thioredoxin reductase (TR) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) in rats. FASEB Journal. 2003. v.17: A1136.
  • Hintze, K.J., Keck, A.S., Finley, J.W., Jeffery, EH. Induction of heptic thioredoxin reductase activity by sulforaphane, both in Hepalclc7 cells and in male Fisher 344 rats. Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry. 2003. 14:173-179.


Progress 10/01/01 to 09/30/02

Outputs
4. What was your most significant accomplishment this past year? A. Foods are complex matrices of many nutrients and other chemicals, and interactions of food components may help or hinder the absorption and utilization of essential nutrients. In work conducted jointly at the GFHNRC and the University of Illinois we have studied the interaction of selenium from broccoli and glucosinolates, non-nutritive chemicals with anti-cancer properties, in broccoli. We have demonstrated that thioredoxin reductase, a selenium protein, can be activated by glucosinolates whereas glutathione peroxidase, another selenium protein, is not activated by glucosinolates and, in fact, the activity of glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) decreases as the activity of thioredoxin reductase increases. These results imply that some selenium proteins may be part of a wider network of proteins that are regulated by a common mechanism, the reported Anti-oxidant Response Element (ARE) is a possible regulatory element. B. We have developed the protocol for a human study that will involve feeding subjects different amounts and types of broccoli in order to determine the interactive effects of Se and glucosinolates on human health. The protocol has been approved by the University of North Dakota Institutional Review Board (IRB). The study requires the production of several hundred pounds of specialty broccoli; approximately 12 of the needed amount of broccoli has been produced and is ready for consumption. C. None D. This report serves to document research conducted under a reimbursable agreement between ARS and the Department of Chemistry, University of North Dakota. Additional details of the research can be found in the report for the parent CRIS 5450-51000-032-00D. Dr. E. Jeffery at the Univ. of Illinois has an active research program examining the health benefits of glucosinolate compounds found in broccoli. She has collaborated with a plant breeder to develop different strains of broccoli with different concentrations of glucosinolates. Our work with broccoli has been examining the health benefits of selenium that accumulates in broccoli grown under special high-Se conditions. This project is designed to join these two lines of research and determine whether the two compounds have any nutritional interaction.

Impacts
(N/A)

Publications

  • None.