Source: PURDUE UNIVERSITY submitted to
SOYBEAN PATHOGEN GERMPLASM COLLECTION: PHYTOPHTHORASOJAE & NORTHERN REGION UNIFORM SOYBEAN TESTS
Sponsoring Institution
Agricultural Research Service/USDA
Project Status
NEW
Funding Source
Reporting Frequency
Annual
Accession No.
0403600
Grant No.
58-3602-0-141
Project No.
3602-21220-009-05S
Proposal No.
(N/A)
Multistate No.
(N/A)
Program Code
(N/A)
Project Start Date
Sep 18, 2000
Project End Date
Sep 17, 2005
Grant Year
2000
Project Director
ABNEY T S
Recipient Organization
PURDUE UNIVERSITY
(N/A)
WEST LAFAYETTE,IN 47907
Performing Department
BOTANY AND PLANT PATHOLOGY
Non Technical Summary
(N/A)
Animal Health Component
25%
Research Effort Categories
Basic
50%
Applied
25%
Developmental
25%
Classification

Knowledge Area (KA)Subject of Investigation (SOI)Field of Science (FOS)Percent
2031820108020%
2041820108050%
2121820108015%
2121820116015%
Goals / Objectives
Establish a data base of available Phytophthora sojae isolates suitable to provide the soybean industry with properly identified, highly virulent, isolates of Phytophthora sojae races that can be used to identify Phytophthora root rot resistance genes in soybean.
Project Methods
Determine virulence, physiological and genetic characteristics, and storage techniques of available Phytophthora sojae isolates that can be maintained and distributed by a "Pathogen Germplasm Conservation System". Phytophthora sojae isolates will be tested with established differential cultivars. Selected isolates currently maintained by the cooperator will receive major attention and additional isolates will be obtained from other locations, if necessary, to create duplicate collections of key races. Isolates of all key races will be preserved by the best available method and evaluated for virulence after extended periods of time in storage.

Progress 10/01/04 to 09/30/05

Outputs
4d Progress report. This report serves to document research conducted under a specific cooperative agreement between ARS and Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana. Additional details of research can be found in the report for the parent project, 3602-21220-009-00D, entitled "Enhancing Resistance to Root Rot Pathogens of Soybean". As part of an initiative by the USDA, United Soybean Board and American Seed Trade Association, funds were provided for the support of a soybean pathogen germplasm collection. Funding for collections of Phytophthora sojae and soybean cyst nematode, Heterodera glycines, for the initial years of this endeavor was established at four locations. Management and culture of the PHYTOPHTHORA SOJAE isolates included in the Indiana race collection were continued in 2005. Numerous requests for isolates of selected races by researchers at seed companies and universities have been fulfilled. A Ph.D. graduate student from Purdue University that is screening plant and soil samples for additional sources of P. sojae race isolates is collaborating with researchers on this project in 2004 and 2005. Research that will enhance standardization of protocols for race identification utilizing the new Rps8 gene, effective storage and management of P. sojae races was emphasized. Seed sources of Indiana soybean differentials routinely used in verifying race reactions increased in 2004 were distributed to collaborators. Attempts to salvage virulent isolates of the MS collection (i.e., Dr. R. Keeling's isolates) have continued to emphasize the need to develop and maintain collaborative race collection research programs at more than one location (i.e., race collections at both OH and IN). New isolates of selected races with virulence patterns similar to several of the original MS isolates have been identified in plant and soil samples from soybean fields in KY, IN and MO. Presentations were given for soybean breeders and pathologists attending meetings in 2004-05 (North Central Plant Pathologists, Indiana Soybean Board, Central Indiana Extension Educators and in special presentation for visitors and Plant Pathology classes at Purdue University). A presentation based on data from a 2004 publication (Dorrance, A.E., Jia, H., Abney, T.S. 2004. Evaluation of soybean differentials for their interaction with Phytophthora sojae. Plant Health Progress. 0309(1). Available: http://www.plantmanagementnetwork.org/sub/php/research/2004/psojae/) and 2005 data involving Harosoy, Williams, and Bedford isolines with selected P. sojae races was also given for the North Central soybean-Phytophthora researchers attending the North Central Soybean Research Project meeting at Windsor, Canada in June 2005. The Northern States Uniform Soybean Tests were coordinated. Results of the 2004 soybean evaluations were tabulated and published for distribution to soybean researchers at the Feb. 2005 meeting in St. Louis, MO. Seed for the 2005 Uniform Tests from participating state and federal soybean researchers was coordinated and distributed to participants in April 2005. Soybean disease nurseries were established at two IN field sites. Soybean yield tests were established at three IN production sites for evaluation of soybeans in maturity group I, II, III, & IV categories. These tests evaluate elite, publicly developed breeding lines. Data from the IN and other state tests are used to determine which advanced breeding lines merit release as germplasm or as improved cultivars for commercial production. Several of the improved breeding lines have a high yield potential and that same germplasm will eventually make its way into varieties available to soybean growers.

Impacts
(N/A)

Publications


    Progress 10/01/03 to 09/30/04

    Outputs
    4. What were the most significant accomplishments this past year? D. Progress Report: This report serves to document research conducted under a specific cooperative agreement between ARS and Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana. Additional details of research can be found in the report for the parent project, 3602-21220-009-00D, entitled "Enhancing Resistance to Root Rot Pathogens of Soybean". As part of an initiative by the USDA, United Soybean Board and American Seed Trade Association, funds were provided for the support of a soybean pathogen germplasm collection. Funding for collections of Phytophthora sojae and soybean cyst nematode, Heterodera glycines, for the initial years of this endeavor was established at four locations. Management and culture of the PHYTOPHTHORA SOJAE isolates included in the Indiana race collection were continued in 2004. Numerous requests for isolates of selected races by researchers at seed companies and universities have been fulfilled. A visiting scientist from the University of Minnesota that is screening exotic germplasm for additional sources of P. sojae resistance collaborated with researchers on this project in 2004. Research that will enhance standardization of protocols for effective storage and management of P. sojae races was emphasized. Seed sources of Indiana soybean differentials routinely used in verifying race reactions increased in 2003 were distributed to collaborators. Attempts to salvage virulent isolates of the MS collection (i.e., Dr. R. Keeling's isolates) have continued to emphasize the need to develop and maintain collaborative race collection research programs at more than one location (i.e., race collections at both OH and IN). Most of the MS isolates do not provide consistent race reactions; however, new isolates of selected races with virulence patterns similar to several of the original MS isolates have been identified in plant and soil samples from IN soybean fields. Presentations were given for soybean breeders and pathologists attending meetings in 2003-04 (North Central Plant Pathologists, Indiana Soybean Board, Central Indiana Extension Educators and in special presentation for visitors and Plant Pathology classes at Purdue University). The Northern States Uniform Soybean Tests were coordinated. Results of the 2003 soybean evaluations were tabulated and published for distribution to soybean researchers at the Feb. 2004 meeting in St. Louis, MO. Seed for the 2004 Uniform Tests from participating state and federal soybean researchers was coordinated and distributed to participants in April 2004. Soybean disease nurseries were established at two IN field sites. Soybean yield tests were established at three IN production sites for evaluation of soybeans in maturity group I, II, III, & IV categories. These tests evaluate elite, publicly developed breeding lines. Data from the IN and other state tests are used to determine which advanced breeding lines merit release as germplasm or as improved cultivars for commercial production. Presentation about soybean yield and performance of improved soybean lines included in the northern states uniform soybean tests were given for the United Soybean Board at St. Louis, MO and for growers and researchers attending the 2004 Midwest Soybean Conference at Des Moines, IA.

    Impacts
    (N/A)

    Publications