Source: FLORIDA A&M UNIVERSITY submitted to
NEW AND BEGINNING FARMER TRAINING PROGRAM
Sponsoring Institution
National Institute of Food and Agriculture
Project Status
TERMINATED
Funding Source
Reporting Frequency
Annual
Accession No.
0219876
Grant No.
2009-49400-05946
Project No.
FLAX200902
Proposal No.
2009-03983
Multistate No.
(N/A)
Program Code
BFRDP
Project Start Date
Sep 1, 2009
Project End Date
Aug 31, 2012
Grant Year
2014
Project Director
Richardson, V. H.
Recipient Organization
FLORIDA A&M UNIVERSITY
(N/A)
TALLAHASSEE,FL 32307
Performing Department
Extension Service
Non Technical Summary
Today, farmers entering agriculture face challenges, including high land prices, increasing equipment costs, and government subsidy payments predominantly delivered to larger, more established farmers. The economic future of agriculture depends on the ability of new and beginning farmers to start and successfully operate agricultural enterprises. This is particularly true for African-American farmers. The African-American farmer is a rare breed in the U.S., and their numbers have declined dramatically over the past few decades, particularly due to the young people not entering the field to replace the increasingly aging population. Farming is no longer the hard, manual labor venture of old, but a technical and managerial occupation. Awareness must be brought to the fact that farming can be a viable, profitable venture for new and beginning African-American entrants. While farm entry has never been easy, it has not been as challenging as it is today. Traditional methods of farm entry are no longer sufficient to assure success, and supports and services are not adequate to meet the specific needs of the next generation of farmers. The challenge is to encourage farm entry by removing the barriers in four major areas that face the next generation farmer: 1) access to training, education and technical assistance; 2) access to land; 3) access to capital and credit, and; 4) access to markets. The proposed project utilizes multi-disciplined instructors and multi-dimensional teaching strategies to reduce barriers to farm-entry and improve the likelihood of success. The Project's target audience is new and beginning farmers who have not farmed before or have farmed less than 10 years. Project emphasis will be placed on new and beginning farmers who are less than 25 years of age and/or African-American, and core focus areas are business and financial management, marketing and production technologies and practices. The goal of the project is to use the basic business development model and apply it to agriculture operations; thus, tying business and marketing skills to agriculture, making it a seamless endeavor and increase the likelihood of economic profitability. The project objective is to equip new and beginning farmers in Florida with relevant and measurable, knowledge, skills and tools to make informed decisions that lead to successful agricultural operations. Specifically the project will teach and demonstrate: 1) production and management practices that enhance land stewardship; 2) business management and decision making strategies that enhance the financial viability of new farm operations; 3) marketing strategies that enhance competitiveness of new farm operations, and; 4) legal strategies that assist with farm transfer and acquisition. Anticipated long-term outcomes are 1) sustainable educational networks 2) best practice strategies for farm entry, and 3) increased number of target audience starting and managing agricultural enterprises.
Animal Health Component
100%
Research Effort Categories
Basic
(N/A)
Applied
100%
Developmental
(N/A)
Classification

Knowledge Area (KA)Subject of Investigation (SOI)Field of Science (FOS)Percent
60160303100100%
Goals / Objectives
The economic future of agriculture depends on the ability of new and beginning farmers to start and successfully operate agricultural enterprises. The barriers faced by new and emerging farmers are vastly different from previous generations. Today, farmers entering agriculture face challenges, including high land prices, increasing equipment costs, and government subsidy payments predominantly delivered to larger, more established farmers. This is particularly true for African-American, or black farmers. Farming is no longer the hard, manual labor venture of old, but a technical and managerial occupation. Awareness must be brought to the fact that farming can be a viable, profitable venture for new and beginning African-American entrants. The proposed project is multi-disciplined and utilizes multi-dimensional teaching strategies, on-farm demonstrations, web-based curriculum (self-directed) and incubation (intensive hands-on instruction specific to young people below age 25). The Project target audience is new and beginning farmers defined as those farmers who have not farmed before or have farmed less than 10 years. Particular project emphasis will be placed on new and beginning farmers who are young (less than 25 years of age and/or African-American. The project core focus areas are business and financial management, marketing and production technologies and practices. The overall mission of the proposed project is to provide educational opportunities and technical assistance that improves the likelihood of success for the next generation of small farmers. The goal of the project is to use the basic business development model and apply it to agriculture operations; thus, tying business and marketing skills to agriculture, making it a seamless endeavor and increase the likelihood of economic profitability. The project objective is to equip new and beginning farmers in Florida with relevant and measurable, knowledge, skills and tools to make informed decisions that lead to successful agricultural operations. Specifically the project will teach and demonstrate: 1) production and management practices that enhance land stewardship; 2) business management and decision making strategies that enhance the financial viability of new farm operations; 3) marketing strategies that enhance competitiveness of new farm operations, and; 4) legal strategies that assist with farm transfer and acquisition. The Project's short-term outcomes are: 1)New and beginning farmers are equipped with effective decision-making skills and accessible information and capacity building resources 2)Beginning farmers and resource providers have established collaborative linkages. Young Farmer Entrepreneurs (young people below age 25) implement their agricultural enterprise through an incubator to ensure ongoing and responsive intervention. Anticipated long-term outcomes are 1)sustainable educational networks 2)best practice strategies for farm entry, and 3)increased number of new and beginning farmers successful starting and managing agricultural enterprises.
Project Methods
The proposed activities are designed to utilize basic business development model and apply it to agriculture operations; thus, tying business and marketing skills to agriculture, making it a seamless endeavor and increase the likelihood of economic profitability. The proposed project will also utilize non-traditional approaches to extension training and assistance activities including: 1) Web-based, self-directed training and assistance specifically for new and beginning farmers to help them access the resources they need based on their goals, skills and progress in beginning a farm operation. 2) Business Incubator Model for agricultural production and marketing demonstrations targeting new and beginning farmers under the age of 25. Young Farmer Entrepreneur Incubator will be implemented in collaboration with the New North Florida Cooperative, and will be an intensive, hands-on approach working with a small group of young beginning farmers to establish core business plans and practices that will enable them to start successful agricultural business ventures, while at the same time will allow participants to obtain "real-world, hands-on experiences. 3) A Beginning Farmer Demonstration/Training Site will be used to demonstrate and evaluate various alternative enterprises, production management practices and market development models. Hands-on training activities will be used to demonstrate the viability of alternative market opportunities including institutions, retail, and direct-to-consumer outlets. Additional demonstration efforts include incorporating e-commerce and other internet technology to connect new and beginning farmers to their customers. On-station enterprise production and market demonstrations will be complemented with business management seminars and workshops related to those enterprises and markets. Data will be collected from all on-station and on-farm demonstrations, and will be subjected to statistical analysis for troubleshooting purposes as well as to make conclusive and persuasive arguments about the success of the project. Results from the analysis will be disseminated through publications, seminars and conferences and web-based sources. The ability of the project to effectively address the needs of the target clientele will be the best measure of evaluation. Therefore, the project will use the number of farmer participants, as well as those who actually adopt any or all aspects of the program as indicators of success, including new enterprises, value added practices or demonstrate knowledge of acquired skills and ability needed to manage the enterprise. Satisfaction is paramount to the success of the project, therefore, feedback from participants will be used to modify delivery methods and contents as necessary. A before and after questionnaire will be used at each workshop or training session to determine whether or not the respective sessions are effective. It is anticipated that at least 50% of the participants will improve their odds of farm business success as a result of participating in the project.

Progress 09/01/11 to 08/31/12

Outputs
OUTPUTS: The project established on-farm demonstration training sites to conduct hands-on training in crop production and management practices, plasticulture, irrigation and water management, harvesting, post-harvest handling, value-added processing and packaging, food safety, market development and distribution to schools, retail grocery stores and local community outlets. Fifteen (15) production/marketing demonstrations were conducted at a total of four (4) on-farm sites; products included collards, turnips, okra, southern peas. 116 hands-on crop production and marketing training activities were conducted with adult and youth beginning farmers; approximately 806 contacts. Two group hands-on training sessions were conducted with youth beginning farmers; approximately 14 contacts. Seven on-line training modules were developed, including goal setting and resource analysis; other modules in were developed in starting a farm operation, marketing strategies, product development, food safety, and utilized for group sessions. Youth Garden-based demonstration was conducted in three north Florida counties covering 3 community-based and 4 school sites; 192 youth participated in garden-based demonstration training; approximately 200 demonstration training sessions were conducted; 25 participants (20 students and 5 adults) made presentation to their school on how to sell and market products grown in their garden. Participants engaged in all aspects of the garden experience to include cultivation, planting, fertilization, weeding, pest management and harvesting; other activities included hosting a luncheon where vegetables from the garden were served and agri-preneurship training sessions culminating in the marketing and hosting of a Farmers' Market Day where the youth sold vegetables from their gardens. Outcomes included knowledge and skills in how to implement a variety of ag-production systems and how to generate income through agricultural enterprises. A multi-disciplinary garden based curriculum was produced from best practices learned from the garden-based demonstration groups, consisting of seven lesson plans integrated with various classroom and garden activities that are relevant to each specific lesson topic. Seven on-line training modules were developed, including goal setting and resource analysis; other modules in were developed in starting a farm operation, marketing strategies, product development, food safety, and utilized for group sessions. Web-based information was also used to promote the intensive, on-site training demonstrations. Promotional, brochures and bookmarks were disseminated at educational activities, conferences and other farm-related events. 26 youth participated in Foster Care Achievement Project (Made By Us) Member Orientation Workshop where they shared their experiences in entrepreneur education in hopes to develop business leadership skills and job opportunity for others who also aged-out of foster care. PARTICIPANTS: Principal Investigator - Vonda Richardson Contributed 10% time and effort to project planning, implementation and evaluation, including reporting and fiscal management. Co-Principal Investigator - Sandra Thompson Contributed 10% time and effort to project planning, implementation and evaluation, including online training curriculum and program specifications. Glyen Holmes - part-time position providing project support in coordinating demonstration training sites and activities, assisting with recruiting project participants, coordinating and conducting training and outreach activities, as well as project planning and evaluation. Lee Otis Britt - part-time position providing project support to establish, coordinate and manage production demonstration site(s) and select on-farm sites; duties include training and assistance in land preparation, crop production and management, harvesting and other project related activities as directed. TARGET AUDIENCES: Size of Target Beginning Farmer Audience At project start - data collected from 2007 Census of Agriculture Years on Present Farm Florida North Florida region* Under 2 years 2,199 402 10 years or less 10,153 1,569 Age Group Under 25 89 4 *North Florida region includes the following counties within a 150 mile radius of Tallahassee PROJECT MODIFICATIONS: Nothing significant to report during this reporting period.

Impacts
One mentor farmer provided training in crop production management and harvesting at his farm for beginning farmer participants to take back and implement at their demonstration sites. One female beginning farmer participant established production site at her home for revenue generation, as well as to provide training for other beginning farmers. Female beginning farmer started okra operation at NNFC demonstration site; began marketing okra to local grocery store; 100 lbs. per week over summer season; she started production in Hoop House in late summer to evaluate season extension for okra into cooler months in order to continue marketing to grocery stores. St. Mary's Beginning Farmers Group developed marketing and business plan for producing and selling to 17 local independent retail grocery stores and 2 restaurants beginning September, 2011. One (1) designated Farm Manager hired to oversee production. One (1) participant trainer to conduct training in production, harvesting, post-harvest handling, value-added processing and packaging. Four (4) designated drivers for the group to distribute products to select market outlets. 14-16 group members participated in processing of products produced for markets. Approximately 1,200 lbs. of leafy greens were marketed weekly to retail stores in north Florida, south Georgia and south Alabama. Group initially purchased product from mentor existing farmers, then transition to producing approximately 50% their own product needed to meet market demand. Group provided training to visiting farmer group (overview of production/marketing operation and tour of their demonstration site).

Publications

  • No publications reported this period


Progress 09/01/09 to 08/31/12

Outputs
OUTPUTS: Year One. 43 training activities, reaching 318 participants, were conducted in the areas of producer group development, goal setting, alternative markets, crop production management, value-added processing and packaging. Year Two. 91 training sessions, reaching 633 participants were conducted in financial management, producer group development, goal setting, alternative markets, crop production management, value-added processing and packaging, distribution, food handling and safety. 4 hands-on training sessions were conducted in processing, packaging, distribution, and financial plan management reaching 68 contacts. Over 2,400 fourth and fifth grade students, teachers and volunteers participated in activities designed to introduce agribusiness development and ownership. 20 youth participated in activity involving local farmers, agricultural production equipment demonstrations, and hands-on demonstration in value-added processing and packaging. 39 sessions were conducted reaching total of 336 participants in a year-long course designed to provide a basic overview of current business and information systems and to introduce the basic skills required for today's business environments. Web-based training materials were developed as an online, self-directed training program for new and beginning farmers, consisting of modules including goal setting and resource analysis, starting a farm operation, marketing strategies, product development. Modules will be continually developed and uploaded. Web-based information was also used to promote the youth and adult beginning farmer training demonstrations. Promotional, brochures and bookmarks were developed and disseminated to clientele at training activities and other farm-related events. Year Three. The project established on-farm demonstration training sites in crop production and management practices, plasticulture, irrigation and water management, harvesting, post-harvest handling, value-added processing and packaging, food safety, market development and distribution to schools, retail grocery stores and local community outlets. 15 production/marketing demonstrations were conducted on 4 on-farm sites. 116 hands-on crop production and marketing training activities were conducted reaching 806 participants. 192 youth participated in garden-based demonstration training with approximately 200 demonstration training sessions. 25 participants made presentation to their school on how to sell products grown in their garden. Outcomes included knowledge and skills in how to implement a variety of ag-production systems and how to generate income through agricultural enterprises. A multi-disciplinary garden based curriculum was produced consisting of seven lesson plans integrated with various classroom and garden activities that are relevant to each specific lesson topic. Seven on-line training modules were developed, including goal setting and resource analysis; other modules in were developed in starting a farm operation, marketing strategies, product development, food safety, and utilized for group sessions. PARTICIPANTS: Principal Investigator - Vonda Richardson Contributed 10% time and effort to project planning, implementation and evaluation, including reporting and fiscal management. Co-Principal Investigator - Sandra Thompson Contributed 10% time and effort to project planning, implementation and evaluation, including online training curriculum and program specifications. Glyen Holmes - part-time position providing project support in coordinating demonstration training sites and activities, assisting with recruiting project participants, coordinating and conducting training and outreach activities, as well as project planning and evaluation. Lee Otis Britt - part-time position providing project support to establish, coordinate and manage production demonstration site(s) and select on-farm sites; duties include training and assistance in land preparation, crop production and management, harvesting and other project related activities as directed. Sandrette Taylor and Hazel Pittman - part-time positions provided project support in training youth and adult participants in personal financial management and business development. TARGET AUDIENCES: Size of Target Beginning Farmer Audience After one year - trained approximately 320 adults and 150 youth After two years - trained approximately 630 adults and 2,350 youth After three years - trained approximately 806 adults and 14 youth PROJECT MODIFICATIONS: Not relevant to this project.

Impacts
Beginning Farmer Group participated in training activities to process, package and distribute the produce for their markets. 4 youth participating in one-day educational event indicated their interest in becoming agricultural entrepreneurs. Youth participants engaged in all aspects of the garden experience to include cultivation, planting, fertilization, weeding, pest management and harvesting; other activities included hosting a luncheon where vegetables from the garden were served and agri-preneurship training sessions culminating in the marketing and hosting of a Farmers' Market Day where the youth sold vegetables from their gardens. 26 youth participated in Foster Care Achievement Project (Made By Us) Member Orientation Workshop where they shared their experiences in entrepreneur education in hopes to develop business leadership skills and job opportunity for others who also aged-out of foster care. One mentor farmer provided training in crop production management and harvesting at his farm for beginning farmer participants to take back and implement at their demonstration sites. One female beginning farmer participant established production site at her home for revenue generation, as well as to provide training for other beginning farmers. Female beginning farmer started okra operation at NNFC demonstration site; began marketing okra to local grocery store; 100 lbs. per week over summer season; she started production in Hoop House in late summer to evaluate season extension for okra into cooler months in order to continue marketing to grocery stores. St. Mary's Beginning Farmers Group developed marketing and business plan for producing and selling to 17 local independent retail grocery stores and 2 restaurants. Their plan included 1 designated Farm Manager to oversee production, 1 participant trainer to conduct training in production, harvesting, post-harvest handling, value-added processing and packaging, and 4 designated drivers for the group to distribute products to select market outlets. 14-16 group members participated in processing of products produced for markets. Approximately 1,000- 1,200 lbs. of leafy greens were marketed weekly to retail stores in north Florida, south Georgia and south Alabama. Group initially purchased product from mentor existing farmers, then transitioned to producing approximately 50% their own product needed to meet market demand. Group provided training to visiting farmer group (overview of production/marketing operation and tour of their demonstration site).

Publications

  • No publications reported this period


Progress 09/01/10 to 08/31/11

Outputs
OUTPUTS: Intensive, on-site training activities conducted with two groups of adult and youth beginning farmers. Group classroom and hands-on training activities were conducted in the areas of financial management, producer group development, goal setting, marketing strategies and alternative market development, crop production and management, value-added processing and packaging, distribution and food handling and safety. 40 hands-on training activities were conducted with adult and youth beginning farmers; approximately 340 contacts. 6 group classroom training sessions were conducted with adult and youth beginning farmers; approximately 144 contacts. Other group training activities were conducted with adult and youth farmers. 1st Annual Youth Agriculture and Entrepreneurship Learning Day. Over 2,400 fourth and fifth grade students, teachers and volunteers participated in training and demonstration activities designed to introduce world of business development and ownership that is diversely connected to the field of agriculture. The one-day event included over 40 training and demonstration stations in agri-preneurship, starting a business, marketing (buying and selling), crop and food production, livestock & meat production, veterinary medicine, entomology, agriculture in space, nutrition and fitness, water quality, garden demonstrations, laboratory demonstrations. 4-H Summer Youth Enrichment Campers participated in a one-day Farm to School training and demonstration activity. Twenty (20) youth, ages 6 to 14 participated in activity involving presentations from local farmers, demonstration of agricultural production equipment and hands-on demonstration in value-added processing and packaging of sweet potato products. Youth and Adult Business Training- one-year course is designed to provide a basic overview of current business and information systems and trends and to introduce adults and youth to the basic skills required for today's business environments. Twenty-four (24) sessions were conducted with youth, ages 8-17, twice weekly beginning in March, 2011; nine (9) participants in each class; total 216 contacts. Fifteen (15) sessions were conducted with adults on Saturdays beginning in March, 2011; eight (8) participants in each class; total 120 contacts. Socially Disadvantaged Males-326 Females-307 Black-633 Limited Resource Males-326 Females-307 Black-633 Youth Males-1,116 Females-1,241 Black-1,457 White-900 Currently Farming Males-150 Females-100 Black-250 Farming less than one year Males-150 Females-100 Black-250 Web-based training materials have been developed as an online, self-directed training program for new and beginning farmers. Training will consist of several modules including goal setting and resource analysis, starting a farm operation, marketing strategies, product development, etc. Modules will be continually developed and uploaded. PARTICIPANTS: Principal Investigator - Vonda Richardson contributed 30% time and effort to project planning, implementation and evaluation, including reporting and fiscal management. Co-Principal Investigator - Sandra Thompson contributed 10% time and effort to project implementation. Other personnel - Glyen Holmes, Lee Otis Britt, Saundrette Taylor, Hazel Pittman provided project support to recruit project participants, coordinate and conduct training activities, establish and manage hands-on training demonstrations. TARGET AUDIENCES: Target audience continues to be new an beginning farmers in the north Florida region. Youth audience was expanded to include elementary level students in an effort to introduce agri-preneurship. There was significant interest from persons over age 50 to begin farming operations as group community economic development effort, as well as to encourage younger persons to participate in agricultural business ventures. PROJECT MODIFICATIONS: Nothing significant to report during this reporting period.

Impacts
The proposed project utilized non-traditional approaches to extension training and assistance activities including: 1. Agricultural production and marketing demonstrations targeting new and beginning farmers under the age of 25 to introduce and/or establish core business plans and practices that will enable them to start successful agricultural business ventures. 2. Beginning Farmer Demonstration/ Training Site was used to demonstrate and evaluate various alternative enterprises, production management practices and market development models. 3. Web-based, self-directed training and assistance for new and beginning farmers to access the resources needed based on goals, skills and progress in beginning a farm operation. Face-to-Face Contacts. Seventy-four (74) intensive, on-site training sessions (adult & youth). Seventeen (17) on-site youth training sessions St. Mary's Beginning Farmers Group developed marketing and business plan for producing and selling to local independent retail grocery stores beginning September, 2011. Four (4) hands-on training sessions were conducted in processing, packaging, distribution, and financial plan management through the end of September, 2011; approximately 68 contacts. Twenty 4-H Summer Youth Enrichment Campers participated in a one-day Farm to School training and demonstration activity involving presentations from local farmers, demonstration of agricultural production equipment and hands-on demonstration in value-added processing and packaging. The youth interacted with local farmers and agricultural professionals in candid discussions of their future endeavors, from finishing elementary/middle/ high school to college and career aspirations, as well as entrepreneurship aspirations and opportunities. Four (4) youth indicated their interest in becoming agricultural entrepreneurs. Two years after those who completed a workshop or training. Percentage who are farming - 50% of project participants. Percentage change in knowledge - 90% of project participants. Percentage change in attitudes - 50% of project participants. Percentage planned change in behavior/approach - 50% of project participants. Percentage plan to start farming - 50% of project participants. Percentage plan to continue farming - 50% of project participants.

Publications

  • No publications reported this period


Progress 09/01/09 to 08/31/10

Outputs
OUTPUTS: Activity Measures 1. Website still under construction, proposed launch date October 1, 2010 Website will be developed as an online, self-directed training program for new and beginning farmers. Training will consist of several modules including goal setting and resource analysis, starting a farm operation, marketing strategies, product development, etc. Website will also be used to promote the intensive, on-site youth and adult beginning farmer training demonstrations (highlights/progress, pictures, video). Promotional flyers, brochures and bookmarks are planned. Intensive, on-site youth and adult training activities were promoted by word-of -mouth in a local community and through three (3) recruitment meetings. Twenty-six (26) training activities were conducted with adult and youth beginning farmers in the areas of producer group development, goal setting, marketing strategies and alternative market development, crop production and management, value-added processing and packaging. Other group training activities were conducted with adult and youth farmers. - One (1) local high school culinary class received training in collard green production, value-added processing and packaging. - Four groups of high school students from several north Florida counties received training in agricultural entrepreneurship, agricultural production practices, harvesting and post-harvest handling, and value-added processing and packaging. Each group participated in a four-day training (a different group each week over a period of four weeks). Other training and assistance contacts - Six individual (6) visits with individuals either starting or evaluating an agricultural enterprise. - Four (4) phone contacts with individuals interested in participating in the project activities - Met with three (3) elementary school teachers interested in having their 4th & 5th grade classes participate in agricultural entrepreneurship training exercise for the upcoming school year. 2. Number of Workshops & Training Programs Face-to-Face - Three (3) participant recruitment meetings - Twenty-six (26) intensive, on-site training sessions (adult & youth) - One (1) farmers seminar conducted in collaboration with local county extension program - Seventeen (17) on-site youth training sessions 3. Numbers & Demographics of Participants Attending Training Programs Male Female Black White Socially Disadvantaged 209 109 275 43 Limited Resource 211 112 275 48 Youth 96 50 128 18 Farm Workers Females Currently Farming 96 6 84 18 Farming less than one year none PARTICIPANTS: Principal Investigator - Vonda Richardson Contributed 10% time and effort to project planning, implementation and evaluation, including reporting and fiscal management. Co-Principal Investigator - Sandra Thompson Contributed 10% time and effort to project planning, implementation and evaluation, including online training curriculum and program specifications Technical Support - Cedric Spradley Part-time position providing technical support for developing online training program, including website specifications, software needs, vendor research Field Technician - Lee Otis Britt Part-time position providing project support to establish, coordinate and manage production demonstration site(s) and select on-farm sites; duties include training and assistance in land preparation, crop production and management, harvesting and other project related activities as directed. Consultant Services - New North Florida Cooperative Provided training and assistance in marketing, agricultural production, transportation logistics and use of production, processing equipment (312 hours). TARGET AUDIENCES: Size of Target Beginning Farmer Audience At project start - data collected from 2007 Census of Agriculture Years on Present Farm Florida North Florida region* Under 2 years 2,199 402 10 years or less 10,153 1,569 Age Group Under 25 89 4 *North Florida region includes the following counties within a 150 mile radius of Tallahassee PROJECT MODIFICATIONS: Nothing significant to report during this reporting period.

Impacts
The proposed project utilizes non-traditional approaches to extension training and assistance activities including: 1) Business Incubator Model for agricultural production and marketing demonstrations targeting new and beginning farmers under the age of 25. Young Farmer Entrepreneur Incubator is an intensive and/or hands-on approach working with a small group of young beginning farmers to establish core business plans and practices that will enable them to start successful agricultural business ventures. Several group activities were conducted providing technical training in enterprise production, marketing and business development, market development and value-added production. 146 contact activities generated with youth participants, including an intensive training program, a one-day training activity with high school culinary class, and a four-day training with four groups of youth over a four week period. 2) A Beginning Farmer Demonstration/Training Site is used to demonstrate and evaluate various alternative enterprises, production management practices and market development models. Hands-on training activities in collard and green bean production and marketing is used to demonstrate the viability of alternative market opportunities including institutions, retail, and direct-to-consumer outlets. 323 contact activities generated with adult participants in both Twenty-six (26) intensive, on-site training sessions (adult & youth) and seventeen (17) on-site youth training sessions were conducted. Participants were informally surveyed at each of the training sessions. The following evaluation was generated: Of those completing a workshop or training a. 30% are farming b. 50% change in knowledge c. 10% change in attitudes d. 30% planned change in behavior/approach e. 20% plan to start farming f. 30% plan to continue farming

Publications

  • No publications reported this period