Source: FORT BERTHOLD COMMUNITY COLLEGE submitted to
FORT BERTHOLD INDIAN RESERVATION BEGINNING FARMER AND RANCHER DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM
Sponsoring Institution
National Institute of Food and Agriculture
Project Status
NEW
Funding Source
Reporting Frequency
Annual
Accession No.
0219855
Grant No.
2009-49400-05942
Project No.
NDW-2009-03844
Proposal No.
2009-03844
Multistate No.
(N/A)
Program Code
BFRDP
Project Start Date
Sep 1, 2009
Project End Date
Aug 31, 2012
Grant Year
2014
Project Director
Fredericks, M.
Recipient Organization
FORT BERTHOLD COMMUNITY COLLEGE
P.O. BOX 490
NEW TOWN,ND 58763
Performing Department
(N/A)
Non Technical Summary
Historically, the Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara Tribes were agricultural people since time immemorial and before Lewis and Clark wintered with the Mandan and Hidatsa in the 1800s. Before the inundation of the 155,000 acres of their agricultural and economic land base in the early 1950's, resulting from the construction of the Garrison Dam, the Tribes maintained a strong agricultural economy. Individuals sustained themselves with gardening, farming and ranching activities primarily in the protected river bottom. Today there are many agricultural oriented people struggling to survive in this harsh environment. Many are without the expertise to provide sufficient feed supplies or basic care for their livestock and as a result have stopped ranching and farming. Many of the children of former ranchers and farmers want to return to or continue farming and ranching but do not have the expertise or finances to do so. By developing and disseminating educational curricula and training materials, the Fort Berthold Community College, is fulfilling its mission to "provide quality cultural, academic and vocational education and services for the Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara Nation." The College's vision reads that the "Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara Nation Fort Berthold Community College-a dynamic presence that preserves our past and prepares us for the future." The expected outcomes for the Fort Berthold The Fort Berthold Indian Reservation Beginning Farmer and Rancher include: 16 % (20) of all (124) Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara farmers and ranchers will participate in the program as beginning farmers and ranchers; 100% of the 20 Mandan, Hidatsa, and Arikara beginning farmers and ranchers will complete the modules and receive a Certificate from the Fort Berthold Community College 100% of the 20 Mandan, Hidatsa, and Arikara beginning farmers and ranchers will utilize USDA Programs on trust lands; 100% of the 20 MHA beginning farmers and ranchers will understand the rules and regulations on how to purchase and rent trust lands on the Fort Berthold Indian Reservation; 50% (10) of all participants will successfully sustain farming and ranching efforts over the next ten years
Animal Health Component
75%
Research Effort Categories
Basic
(N/A)
Applied
75%
Developmental
25%
Classification

Knowledge Area (KA)Subject of Investigation (SOI)Field of Science (FOS)Percent
9036030302034%
9036299303033%
9036299310033%
Goals / Objectives
1. Production and management strategies to enhance land stewardship by beginning farmers and ranchers: Mentoring, apprenticeship, and internship activities; Curriculum development; Whole farm planning;Basic livestock and crop farming practices; Specific types of practices, (i.e., sustainable, organic, Best Management Practices, Integrated Pest Management); and Farm saftey. 2. Business management and decision support strategies that enhance the financial viability of beginning farmers and ranchers: Information processing; Resources and referrals including external resources such as Farm Service Agency loan programs; Entrepreneurship and business training; Financial management training; Risk management education; and the acquisition and management of agricultural credit. 3. Marketing strategies that enhance competitiveness of beginning farmers and rachers: Diversification and Marketing Strategies; Understanding Production and Marketing; Innovative farm and ranch. Legal strategies that assist beginning farmers with acquisition and transfer. Technical assistance for beginning farmers or ranchers in acquiring land from retiring farmers and ranchers; Innovative farm and ranch transfer strategies, including training for absentee landowners to bring their land into production; Environmental compliance (understanding rules and regulations); and Development of model land leasing contracts. The following condensed timeline briefly describes the information to support the educational curricula and training materials. The collaborating agencies will provide training input. Quarterly meetings will be conducted at the beginning of each set of workshops to plan, review and evaluate the progress of the activities. October to December: Curriculum Development, On-site workshop scheduling, online workshop development; Cohort I recruited and selected January to April: Spring Workshops-Cohort I January: Whole farm planning (Extension Service) February: Conservation assistance and Range Management (NRCS opportunities BIA discussing trust land improvements) March: Basic Livestock and Crop Farming Practices (Extension, NRCS) April: Farm Safety (Extension materials) May -August: Summer Workshops-Cohort I May: Resources and Referrals (value added training lead by NRCS, FSA and extension) June: Financial Management training (FSA for bookkeeping training) July: Acquisition and management of agricultural credit and Risk management August: Entrepreneurship and business training September-December: Fall Workshops-Cohort I September: Diversification and Marketing Strategies October: Understanding Production and marketing November: Innovative farm and ranch transfer strategies including training for absentee landowners to bring their land into production December: Environmental Compliance January - April: Capstone-Whole Farm Planning-Cohort I January: Development of model land leasing for trust land February: Technical Assistance in managing trust land leases and permits March: Capstone Project/Whole Farm Planning April: Capstone Project/Mentoring for Whole Farm Planning; Certficate Awarded. The second Cohort will follow a similar schedule.
Project Methods
A cohort of ten (10) beginning farmers and ranchers will be selected as participants. They will attend workshops, seminars, demonstrations, both on campus in New Town, and on-site, one on one or at locations near the producers' farms or ranches. The curricula will be both hands-on and provided through online distance delivery. This will enable the beginning farmers and ranchers to manipulate the information according to their own convenient schedule and on-site at their farms and ranches. Information processing is the backbone of course content delivery. The following will be incorporated throughout the workshops: Best Management Practices; wherever possible implementing organic farming;Increasing sustainability and Integrated Pest Management. Each Cohort will have monthly seminars conducted on the Fort Berthold Community College campus in New Town that will include speakers from the community such as tribal elders to discuss traditional farming practices, tribal farmers and ranchers who are succeeding in agri-business and local policy makers. The purpose of the Cohort monthly seminars is to allow the beginning farmers and ranchers to share experiences and learn from successful farmers and ranchers what strategies have worked best. Monthly symposia will include agency personnel and active agricultural professionals who will impart valuable knowledge and hands-on demonstrations. The second cohort of participants will be recruited in the same manner as the first cohort. The first cohort of beginning Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara farmers and ranchers will also promote recruitment through their own experiences with the program. The first cohort of participants will evolve into mentors for the second cohort of farmers and ranchers. The Fort Berthold Indian Reservation Beginning Farmer and Rancher will measure the success of the project's impacts by conducting both a summative and formative evaluation. An evaluation committee comprised of the collaboration members, as well as the Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara ranchers and farmers themselves, and Cohort Participants will oversee the process. The following indicators will guide the evaluation process. 1. Number of Fort Berthold beginning farmers and ranchers receiving outreach services and applying for assistance to USDA sponsored farm/ranch programs, attaining credit and using the business/financial management systems. 2. Number of beginning farmers and ranchers actually approved and receiving aid from a USDA sponsored program within the Department of Agriculture. 3. Number of beginning farmer and rancher producers and age groups attending workshops and classes where the knowledge gained will assist in a sustainable future. 4. Completion/progress of revolving credit cooperative, capitalization coop and number of members receiving their first group of beef cows. 5. Outcomes of successful collaborations/networks; current and newly established. The final scope of this project will be qualitative measures and satisfaction of Mandan,Hidatsa and Arikara beginning farmers and ranchers producing and living a lifestyle that their forefathers enjoyed and exhibited great pride.

Progress 09/01/11 to 08/31/12

Outputs
OUTPUTS: -RightRisk, LLC. covered information on Estate Planning, Leaving a Legacy, Better Management Through Basic Agricultural Records, Alternative Enterprises, and an Ag Simulation "Ag Survivor". -11th Annual Tri-County Range Tour (design, construction, implementation, and cost-sharing on waste management systems; NRCS and USFWS cost-sharing programs; producer experiences; plant identification and cover cropping systems) -FSA-What and "Who is the Farm Service Agency (FSA)"; FSA loan purposes; Guaranteed Lending Program; general eligibility requirements; and general requirements for a complete application. NRCS-conservation programs and the proposals being targeted for funding (how proposals are scored, ranked, and funded). -North Dakota Adult Farm and Ranch Business Management-introduction to Quickens; using income/expense records for business and family living; entering data and generating reports with income/expense records; how to use financial records; uses for a balance sheet; how to organize data for a balance sheet; constructing a balance sheet; interpreting a balance sheet; and cash flow planning. -Indian Land Tenure Foundation- Plenary power American Indians have on reservations, specifically discussing some of the legal implications and how it relates to the land owners on Fort Berthold. The BFRDP also sponsored an elder's panel. -RightRisk LLC delivered risk management materials to the BFRDP participants. Day one consisted of information from the Lasting Legacy Course I & II, Getting on Track: Better Management through Basic Ag Records, Feasibility of Alternative Rural Enterprises, and finishing with an Ag Survivor Risk Simulation Module, and one-on-one coaching with producers. Website established for workshop www.northdakota.erightrisk.com. -Participants attended a High Tunnel Workshop for home gardeners and commercial growers in Moorhead, MN; a Range Health Workshop in Mandan, ND; and attended the Northern Plains Sustainable Ag Society's High Tunnel Workshop in Mandan, ND. -Attended two field trips with the North Dakota Grazing Lands Coalition and the Burleigh County Soil Conservation Programs. Topics included: the benefits of cover cropping; using livestock as a management tool; watering and fencing systems; changing calving seasons; importance of good record keeping; holistic management; improving soil health; and slake and infiltration tests. -Sustainable Foods and Alternative Agriculture Workshop - Participants and staff that participated in this 1.5 day event were exposed to Principles of Integrated Pest Management, Sustainable Foods (no-till, national food data, importance of locally grown foods), Farmers Markets, benefits of and experiences with Raised bed/container gardening, tour of the 15 acre land the college manages (community garden plots, large segment plots, cover cropping, crop rotations, traditional garden, and invasive weed challenges), raised bed demonstration, Experience with and benefits of High Tunnel gardening, how to apply integrated pest management to FBCC land lab acreage, and how to network with tribal members. PARTICIPANTS: Adam Guy - Lead - Hosted seminars; provided participants with additional programming opportunities; reserved meeting places; promoted events through email, radio; and other media; continued curriculum development; provided one-on-one training; hosted Sustainable Foods and Alternative Ag Workshop; budget oversight; and attended and presented at annual PD meeting in Fort Collins, CO. Andrew Jasken - Instructor - attended all events, assisted with facilitating communications between participants, staff, and program partners. Mary Fredericks - PD - Oversight of project. Consultant - Frank Kutka - dakotacornbreeder@gmail.com; FSA - Craig Argabright - craig.argabright@nd.usda.gov; Mark Ihringer - mark.ihringer@nd.usda.gov; Dirk Nysveen - dirk.nysveen@nd.usda.gov; NRCS - Carey Dreher - carey.dreher@nd.usda.gov; RightRisk, LLC - Jeff Tranel - jtranel@erightrisk.com; Rod Sharp - rsharp@erightrisk.com; North Dakota Adult Farm Management - Jerry Tuhy - j.tuhy@bismarckstate.edu; North Dakota Grazing Lands Coalition - Mary Stevens - dakotaprairiesrcd@gmail.com; Ken Miller - kenneth.miller@nd.nacdnet.net; Joshua Dukart; Gabe Brown; ILTF - Terry Janis - tjanis@iltf.org; Cris Stainbrook - cstainbrook@iltf.org; IMP - Sue Ratcliffe - sratclif@illinoi.edu; Mike Daniels - nativeipm@yahoo.com; George Godfrey - pggg92@gmail.com; NDSU Extension - Jay Fisher - jay.fisher@ndsu.edu; Tim Petry - tim.petry@ndsu.edu; ; Todd Weinmann - todd.weinmann@ndsu.edu; Dakota College at Bottineau - Holly Mawby - hollyrosemawby@dakotacollege.edu; Baker Engineering - Paige Baker - baker.paige@gmail.com TARGET AUDIENCES: The project served beginning farmers, ranchers, and gardeners on the Fort Berthold Indian Reservation. The program has provided the audience with one-on-one, in-class, online based, and hands-on field trip expereinces with their training. The project provided experiences and opportunities that participants previously were not or would have been exposed to without this program. The project has served the participants in providing them with a well versed based of professional mentors and numerous topics were covered. The project challenged participants to think outside the traditional paradigm of farming and ranching and helped cultivate new ideas for them to implement with future production operations. PROJECT MODIFICATIONS: Unable to conduct ranch visits and increase project participation due to continued lack of infrastructure. All major roadways to/from New Town are under major reconstruction due to the increased traffic from the Oil and Gas Industry. This is not pertinent to just New Town, but rather to most of western ND. Where a typical commute may take 1 hour, it is now taking 2-4 hours depending on stoppages, detours, traffic increase. The city of New Town (~1200 pre-boom, can now take half an hour to try take a left hand turn). The oil boom has significantly impacted agriculture and programming as a whole. Land values have increased exponentially and owners are selling pasture land (pre-boom ~$250.00/acre to boom $50,000.00 plus/acre) at high rates. This reduces the surface land for livestock production on Fort Berthold. Not only are land values impeding programming, but many producers are getting much higher wages working in the oil and gas sector or receiving monies through mineral royalties and no longer need to work in agriculture. We, Extension and Education, across western ND and throughout the oil patch are struggling to be effective in keeping producers interested in agriculture. We believe there will be a ripple effect from this oil and gas industry on agriculture.

Impacts
-Participants learned the importance of estate planning and having in living wills in place to protect living family members in the event of an emergency or death. Participants reviewed the importance of keeping good records, as it is not a requirement for individuals to keep records when working on trust lands. RightRisk, LLC presented information, data, and statistics on alternative agriculture enterprises and the class participated in an ag simulation module called 'Ag Survivor'. -Participants attended a field trip to a range tour sponsored by NRCS and the Soil Conservation Districts. This tour focused on waste management systems, specifically talking about the funding available, benefits of implementing a system, and heard from the host producer. -Participants learned about FSA and who to contact at their local office for questions regarding the FSA loan programs. During this class they also learned more about NRCS and who the local office contact was and what kind of programs they offer producers. -Participants learned a variety of useful business management tools from the North Dakota Adult Farm Management seminar, which included an introduction to Quickens; using income/expense records for business and family living; entering data and generating reports with income/expense records; how to use financial records; uses for a balance sheet; how to organize data for a balance sheet; constructing a balance sheet; interpreting a balance sheet; and cash flow planning. -ILTF provided a platform for tribal members to understand the power they have on their lands and were engaged with speaker in a 1.5 day Oil and Gas Energy Summit. -Participants learned about high tunnels (how to purchase one, importance of placement, what to grow in northern climates, and producer experiences). -Participants saw first hand the benefits of cover cropping to build soil health; benefits of grazing management through paddock systems; fencing and watering systems; benefits of pushing back calving season; and heard about producer experiences through adapting holistic management philosophies. -Participants learned about holistic management, benefits of raised be gardening systems, how to network with tribal members, learned about FBCC's agricultural efforts, and about high tunnel gardening.

Publications

  • No publications reported this period


Progress 09/01/10 to 08/31/11

Outputs
OUTPUTS: September 15, 2010 - For the fourth training seminar, the BFRDP class went to the 3rd Annual Forage Beef and Cover Crop Workshop at the North Dakota State University Dickinson Research Extension Center's Ranch Headquarters. We listened to presentations from the NRCS, SCD, NDSU-DREC, and USDA-ARS about soil health, experience growing cover crops, pasture renovation using cover crops, and how conservative feeding can improve cow herd efficiency and longevity. October 7, 2010 - The North Dakota Adult Farm Management and the North Dakota Grazing Lands Coalition (NDGLC) provided information for the fifth training seminar. December 2, 2010 - The Farm Service Agency (FSA), North Dakota State University, and the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) provided information for the training seminar. January 4, 2011 - The class reviewed the the capstone project "Building a Sustainable Business" handbook and attended a Calving Management Workshop put on by a Colorado State University Professor of Veterinary Science. February 5-7, 2011 - Three participants and a staff member went to the 1st Annual BFRDP National Conference in Orlando, FL to attend the Farm Bureau Conference. February 16, 2011 - The class worked on the Capstone Project, watched SARE webinars, and the movie Food Inc. April 6, 2011 - The class covered information on the capstone project and watched two SARE webinars. May 6, 2011 - The class attended the Northern Livestock Exchange and later used the NDSU-North Central Research Extension Center's conference room to hear presentations from the Research Center staff, the USDA 1994 TCU Program, from ND Adult Farm Management, from two board members of the ND Buffalo Association, and from an NDSU Livestock Economist. June 8, 2011 - The class finished covering the materials for the capstone project. July 12, 2011 - The class brought in guests from Indian Land Tenure Foundation. August 3, 2011 - Cohort 2 attended the 11th Annual Tri-County Range Tour. August 9, 2011 - The class brought in RightRisk LLC to learn about risk management materials. PARTICIPANTS: Mary Fredericks - PD - Program and budget oversight, and attend 1st Annual PD meeting in DC; Adam Guy - Instructor - Develop contact list of program partners, coordinate training seminar dates, set up ranch visits, developed BFRDP curriculum, wrote journal article, set up BFRDP Advisory board, research materials and contacts for participants, attended FALCON 2010, attended 1st Annual BFRDP Conference, attended and presented at NDSU Extension and Tribal College Spring workshop set up BFRDP field trips, presented at Market Place of Ideas New Town workshop, presented at NDSU Extension and Tribal College Horticultural Tour, and provided one-on-one training with participants; James Garrett - Co-PI - Assisted with training seminars and other detailing duties for the FBCC BFRDP. NDSU Extension Service John Dhuyvetter - john.dhuyvetter@ndsu.edu; Jay Fisher - jay.fisher@ndsu.edu (701) 857-7682; Calli Thorne - calli.thorne@ndsu.edu; Frank Kutka - frank.kutka@ndsu.edu (701) 483-2348; Duane Hauck - duane.hauck@ndsu.edu; Chris Boerboom - chris.boerboom@ndsu.edu (701) 231-7178. NDSU Timothy Petry - tim.petry@ndsu.edu (701) 231-7469; Robert Pieri - robert.pieri@ndsu.edu (701) 231-8673. USDA-FSA Dirk Nysveen - dirk.nysveen@ nd.usda.gov (701) 893-2239; Craig Argabright - craig.argabright@nd.usda.gov; Mark Ihringer - mark.ihringer@nd.usda.gov (701) 627-4783; Dave Leith - david.leith@nd.usda.gov (701) 628-2151. USDA-NRCS Carey Dreher - carey.dreher@nd.usda.gov (701) 627-8207; Joe Bear; Dennis Froemke. North Dakota Adult Farm Management Jerry Tuhy - j.tuhy@bismarckstate.edu (701) 483-2348; Tom Hanson - tom.hanson@dakotacollege.edu (701) 420-1802. Indian Land Tenure Foundation Cris Stainbrook cstainbrook@indianlandtenure.org; Terry Janis - tjanis@indianlandtenure.org (651) 223-5400. RightRisk Rod Sharp - rrrod@bresnan.net (970) 245-9149; Jeffrey Tranel - Jeffrey.Tranel@ColoState.edu. NDGLC Mary Stevens dakotaprairiesrcd@gmail.com (701) 250-4222. UN-L Gary Lesoing - glesoing2@unlnotes.edu (402) 274-4755 TARGET AUDIENCES: The project has served beginning farmers and ranchers on the Fort Berthold Indian Reservation. The program has provided more than one way to deliver the materials to participants via in-class, online-based, and hands-on field trip experiences. The project has provided experiences and opportunities that the participants were previously unaware of and would not have attended if it were not for the BFRDP. The project has acted as a liaison-type source between the participants and the program partners. The participants have gained knowledge in more facets of the farm/ranch business than they previously knew. This project has stretched participants ideas and knowledge about farming and ranching practices that they were accustomed to. The project has cultivated ideas and practices in the participants minds and maintains a good working relationship with the participants and the program partners. PROJECT MODIFICATIONS: Unable to conduct ranch visits in the winter months due to winter weather and road closures. Unable to maintain 100% enrollment and participation due to extensive flooding, which led to multiple road closures and the ever booming oil field work in western ND. The oil boom affected us the first year, but we are experiencing even a bigger hit this year. It is hard to compete with the oil field to get farmers and ranchers interested in the program when they are getting high wages in the field. Many young producers are putting their ranching to the side and are deciding to make money while they can. After completing their time in the oil field they are hoping to get back into the farming and ranching as a family business, but no one knows what the future holds. The oil field is also putting roads where no man has been before and developing well sites on previously occupied range units. It is tough watching the destruction of the land first-hand and to see the greed and standard of living drop, and the cost of living shoot through the roof. The project staff views this program as an investment for the future, but unfortunately the young producers view it as a days loss of wages to provide for their family.

Impacts
Participants learned about the uses and benefits of cover cropping systems as they relate to raising cattle. Participants learned about different grazing systems from NDGLC staff, specifically on fencing, rotational grazing, intensive grazing, water systems, cover crops, and using livestock as a management tool; and what they need to get in return from contracting as it relates to their input costs (simulated break down), how to construct a balance sheet, cash flow statements, future prices, and how their numbers compare to other farmers and ranchers in western ND. Participants learned about disaster relief programs and how and when to apply for those with FSA; learned about animal feeding systems, nutritional importance in feeds, body conditioning scores of beef, and about different management systems; and learned more in depth information on prairie ecosystems, specifically different seasonal grasses, over- and under-grazed ranges, and what cattle need in a range system. Participants learned how to develop a business plan through SARE's Building a Sustainable Business handbook; and learned about calving management as a whole (various topics) covered by a CSU doctor of veterinary science. Participants said afterwards that they learned a lot of new techniques and didn't realize the practices they currently used were as harmful to calves as they are. Three participants attended the 1st Annual Beginning Farmer and Rancher Conference in Orlando, FL and learned a lot about the importance of business communications, producer experiences, saw alternative ag businesses, and learned a lot about agriculture as a whole from taking in the entire Farm Bureau and Young Farmers of America Conference. Participants watched Food Inc. and discussed the importance of having a local economy and lessening their dependance on processed foods; participants watched a couple SARE webinars from University of Nebraska on how to direct market cattle and on rural entrepreneurship; covered task materials on developing a business plan for borrower training. Participants went to a livestock auction and saw the bidding wars and what kind of cattle were being sold in early summer; learned the purpose of and the work done by the NDSU Research Center; learned about different programs available to Tribal College Students; learned about ND Buffalo Association (the current and future markets for bison; importance of budgets, balance sheets, and cash flow statements from ND Adult Farm Management; about cattle market trends, alternatives to contracting, and economical aspects of cattle markets from a Livestock Economist. Participants learned about Indian rights of ways, legal documents, estate planning, history of tribal lands, Indian land management, and land tenure aspects from Indian Land Tenure Foundation. Participants attended a Range Tour and learned about waste management practices and programs, prairie ecosystems, about NRCS and USFW program, and producer experiences. Participants learned about risk management materials including: insuring success, legacy planning, financial record keeping, managing risks, and participated in a risk management Ag Survivor simulation module.

Publications

  • Guy, A. (2011). Contemporary Agriculture Practiced on the Reservation. North Dakota Ag News, () : - .


Progress 09/01/09 to 08/31/10

Outputs
OUTPUTS: Farm Service Agency (FSA) gave a seminar on Financial Management and provided participants with a Farm Business Record Book (paper copies and electronic templates). The BFRDP attended the 10th Annual Tri-County Range Tour at ranch near Battleview, ND and listened to presentations from the NRCS, USFWS, and local producers about range health, plant identification, NRCS and USFWS programs, water resources, and different management practices/styles that work for different producers. Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), North Dakota State University (NDSU) Extension Services, and the North Dakota Grazing Lands Coalition (NDGLC) provided information for the training seminar. Topics covered by the NRCS were on programs available to producers, terms and definitions regarding BIA and reservation land, how to fill out program applications. The division of RC&D talked about grants available. Topics covered by NDSU Extension services were on sustainable agriculture and SARE grants. Topics covered by NDGLC were on fencing, water development and placement, goal setting and decision making, monitoring and record keeping, and economics of grazing management. The BFRDP attended the 3rd Annual Forage Beef and Cover Crop Workshop at the NDSU-Dickinson Research Extension Center's Ranch Headquarters near Manning, ND and listened to presentations from the NRCS, SCD, NDSU-DREC employees, and USDA-ARS about soil health, experience growing cover crops, pasture renovation using cover crops, and how conservative feeding can improve cow herd efficiency and longevity. ND Adult Farm Management and NDGLC provided information for the training seminar. Topics covered by ND Adult Farm Management discussed the findings of their annual reports of enrolled producers and how those producers get ranked across the state. The presenter talked about farming and ranching being a family enterprise and other beneficial aspects to think about before getting too invested. Topics covered by NDGLC were on grazing management/rotations, livestock movement, and using livestock as a management tool. NDSU-Extension Service, FSA, and NRCS provided information for the training seminar. Topics covered by the FSA office included disaster relief programs, and qualifications for and rewarding of those programs. Topics covered by NDSU-Extension included ranch planning, feed supplements, costs of production, market trends, and cattle breeds. Topics covered by NRCS included grazing systems, prairie grass species, and cattle management on range lands. The class started the Introduction, Task 1 and 2 of the Building a Sustainable Business Handbook. The class also attended a Calving Management Workshop put on by NDSU Extension. Three participants attended the National BFRDP Conference in Orlando, FL. The class finished Task 2 and 3 of the Building a Sustainable Business Handbook, watched Food Inc., and discussed National Conference. PARTICIPANTS: Mary Fredericks - PD - Program and budget oversight, and attend project director meeting in DC. James Garrett - Co-PI - Assisted with training seminars, discussions, assisted with curriculum development, attend FALCON Conference, and transporting participants to field trips. Adam Guy - Instructor - Developed contact list for partnerships with institutions, agencies, and organizations. Coordinated dates for training seminars, reserved meeting rooms and meals for seminars, contacted professionals and participants, set up ranch visits, developed curriculum for BFRDP, wrote journal article, set up BFRDP advisory board, researched extra materials for participants, one-on-one training with participants, budget oversight, attended project director meeting in DC, attended FALCON conference, and brought three participants to National Conference in Orlando, FL. NDSU Extension Service John Dhuyvetter - john.dhuyvetter@ndsu.edu - 701-857-7682 Calli Thorne - calli.thorne@ndsu.edu - 701-627-3446 Frank Kutka - frank.kutka@ndsu.edu - 701-483-2348 ext. 113 Doug Landblom - douglas.landblom@ndsu.edu - 701-483-2348 ext. 109 Kris Ringwall - cris.ringwall@ndsu.edu - 701-483-2348 USDA-FSA Dirk Nysveen - dirk.nysveen@nd.usda.gov - 701-893-2239 Craig Argabright - craig.argabright@nd.usda.gov - 701-627-4783 Mark Ihringer - mark.ihringer@nd.usda.gov - 701-627-4783 Dave Leith - david.leith@nd.usda.gov - 701-628-2151 ext.2 USDA-NRCS Carey Dreher - carey.dreher@nd.usda.gov - 701-627-8207 Joe Bear - joe.bear@nd.usda.gov - 701-628-2151 ext. 3 Dennis Froemke - dennis.froemke@nd.usda.gov - 701-225-5113 ext. 106 ND Adult Farm Management Jerry Tuhy - j.tuhy@bismarckstate.edu - 701-483-2348 ext. 122 ND Grazing Lands Coalition Ken Miller - kenneth.miller@nd.nacdnet.net - 701-250-4518 ext.118 TARGET AUDIENCES: The project has served beginning farmers and ranchers on the Fort Berthold Indian Reservation. The program has provided more than one way to deliver the materials to participants via in-class, online-based, and hands-on field trip experiences. The project has provided experiences and opportunities that the participants were previously unaware of. The project has acted as a liason-type source between the participants and the institutions, agencies, and organizations. The participants have gained knowledge in more facets of farming and ranching than they previously knew about. This project has stretched participants ideas about farming and ranching practices that have been handed down from the previous generations. The project has cultivated new ideas and practices and maintains a good relationship with the participants and the partnering individuals. PROJECT MODIFICATIONS: Unable to conduct ranch visits throughout the winter because of winter consitions and road closures. Unable to maintain 100% enrollment because of individuals leaving the ranching business to make money in the oil fields of western ND. Unable to conduct training seminars every month in the winter months because of weather conditions, road closings, and college closing due to weather. Eventhough, the program has provided various ways to disseminate information to the participants, it has been a challenge to get all participants together for one reason or another. Since the project is located in a historically underserved and limited-resource area, it is asking a lot for participants to take 1-2 days off a month to attend seminars. The project staff sees the seminars as an investment for the future, but participants see it as a sacrifice to bring home less money for their families when they miss a day of work.

Impacts
Participants learned who is the Farm Service Agency (FSA), FSA loan purposes (operating loans and farm ownership loans), eligibility requirements for loan borrowing, borrower training, general requirements for a complete application, how to make a balance sheet, "what does your financial picture look like", and learned the importance of financial management and keeping good records. At the 10th Annual Tri-County Range Tour, participants learned about grazing management for the northern plains, different livestock watering systems, how to extend the grazing season using bale grazing, NRCS programs, about producer experiences, how to identify range plants, and how to conduct in-the-field hands-on research. Participants learned from NRCS about programs available to producers, terms and definitions regarding BIA, tribal governments, and reservation land, how to fill out program applications, and what the division of RC&D is. Participants learned from NDSU Extension about sustainable agriculture and SARE grants available for producers. Participants learned from NDGLC about fencing strategies and placement, water development and placement, economics of grazing management, importance of goal setting, decision making, monitoring, and good record keeping. At the 3rd Annual Forage Beef and Cover Crop Workshop, participants learned about basic principles of improving soil health, about producer experiences in growing cover crops, pasture renovation with cover crops, how conservative feeding can improve cow herd efficiency and longevity, and what the value of corn for growing calves and wintering cows is. Participants learned about the annual reports about ND farmers and ranchers (the percentages of what producers net income was), how farming and ranching is a family enterprise, tools used on the farm to figure out what you need out of your operation in order to make a profit, the importance of keeping good records, and the benefits and importance of knowing all the aspects of farming and ranching before getting too invested. Participants learned from NDGLC about grazing management/rotations, livestock movement, and how to use livestock as a management tool. Participants learned from FSA about FSA disaster relief programs and the qualifications for, requirements of, and the rewarding of those programs, as well as the importance of record keeping and timely notification to the FSA office. Participants learned from NDSU-Extension about ranch planning, feed supplements, costs of production, market trends, and about cattle breeds. Participants learned from the NRCS about grazing systems, prairie grass species, and cattle management on range lands. Participants learned about "Why are You Developing a Business Plan", how to identify values, common goals for the planning team, values of "your" business plan, how to assess their current situation through marketing, operations, human resources, and finances. Participants learned from a Veterinarian about calving, calving difficulties, and provided tips to calving. Participants learned about visioning for the future, developing a mission statement, and setting and prioritizing goals for a business plan.

Publications

  • Guy, A.C. 2010. Contemporary agriculture practiced on the reservation. ND Ag News (in print).