Source: LAC COURTE OREILLES OJIBWA COMMUNITY COLLEGE submitted to
INDIGENOUS YOUTH LEADERSHIP INSTITUTE
Sponsoring Institution
National Institute of Food and Agriculture
Project Status
TERMINATED
Funding Source
Reporting Frequency
Annual
Accession No.
0219055
Grant No.
2009-47002-05570
Project No.
WISE-2009-02043
Proposal No.
2009-02043
Multistate No.
(N/A)
Program Code
NK
Project Start Date
Sep 1, 2009
Project End Date
Aug 31, 2011
Grant Year
2009
Project Director
DeCora, C. W.
Recipient Organization
LAC COURTE OREILLES OJIBWA COMMUNITY COLLEGE
13466 WEST TREPANIA ROAD
HAYWARD,WI 54843
Performing Department
Youth Development
Non Technical Summary
There is a desperate need for programs directed towards youth in grades 6-12 which include communication, goal setting and career planning, team building, active citizenship, work readiness skills and job training. Native Americans have the highest high school drop out rate of any groups in the United States (40-50%). Those graduating from high school have extremely low retention rates once they decide to attend a 2 or 4 year institute. These numbers can be attributed to factors such as; teen pregnancy, discrimination or prejudices, stereotyping and/or lowered expectations from teachers and administrators, by-products of poverty such as low self-esteem and learned helplessness, distruct of government institutions, boredom on the classroom from a cultural disconnect, or simply not being equipped with proper skills to succeed at the next level. The Indigenous Youth Leadership Program is designed to target all those problem areas which aims to solve those problems and create opportunities for youth to gain experience in valuing diversity, work readiness skills and job training as well as underlying components which employers are looking for; communication, goal setting, team building, and critical thinking. The goals and objectives directly align with CSREES goals and objectives. The program is designed to empower the youth and allow them to find success once they graduate high school and continue on with their education encouraging them to excel without limitations. Empowerment will allow them to realize their potential and encourage them to become educated and move past the factors which are plaguing Native American communities throughout the United States.
Animal Health Component
100%
Research Effort Categories
Basic
(N/A)
Applied
100%
Developmental
(N/A)
Classification

Knowledge Area (KA)Subject of Investigation (SOI)Field of Science (FOS)Percent
90360993020100%
Goals / Objectives
There are two primary goals of the Indigenous Youth Leadership Institute; goal 1 is to engage youth in positive activities that support social, physical, and intellectual growth. The objectives of goal 1 are to establish peer/group activities for youth that build camaraderie, team-building and sense of belonging as well as to promote healthy lifestyles in our youth by balancing our wellness triangle. Goal 2 is to provide cultural activities that promote and develop Ojibwe Leadership Knowledge and Skills to encourage civic engagement. Objectives for goal 2 include; [1]to increase awareness/use of traditional leadership and its effectiveness in today's society, [2] to develop, enroll and deliver leadership and work readiness programs to community youth on a semester basis, [3] to disseminate a program model to a group of professional (regional) service providers working with Native American youth. Both goals and the objectives which are tied to it, are included in a project called "Ogimaakaw" which translates to "Make into a leader" in Ojibwe Language. The project aligns directly with the CSREES Strategic Goal 3: "Support Increased Economic Opportunities and Improve Quality of Life in Rural America" as well as Goal 5: "Improve the Nation's Nutrition and Health." The program is designed to operate on a semester basis with the summer providing the "Trimester" portion of the program. The Indigenous Youth Leadership Institute or "Ogimaakaw" provides specific and attainable goals and objectives within the duration of the project with dates included. The program graduation date for the first wave of students is December 18th 2009. The second wave graduates May 28th 2010 and the summer program graduation is July 30th 2010. The youth will learn skills such as; work readiness, communication, team-building, active citizenship, goal setting and career planning and job training while including culturally relevant participatory projects. The participants will be involved in classroom trainings, participatory projects, work-readiness and job training activities as well as culturally relevant projects important to their community. The youth become the instructors and/or advisers for the new wave of participants, using a train the trainer method. The youth will become a more work-ready, skilled, and educated group of individuals.
Project Methods
The approach is a blend of community participatory projects, classroom trainings and workshops as well as visitations to education and training institutions - increasing social and educational aptitude, and active citizenship capabilities. The youth will complete one semester of work readiness, leadership and active citizenship training coupled with cultural components. The previous semester's participants will be involved in the recruitment, enrollment, marketing and provisioning of the next year's activities. This project will encourage students to examine the juxtaposition of social expectations for each of these communities. Through learning mainstream professional characteristics such as work-readiness skills, valuing diversity and linking those attributes to Ojibwe cultural values of respect, seasonality of life cycles, and oration the youth will gain a sense of empowerment. The classroom training will build essential workforce skills which will help student realize that reading, writing and valuing diversity is valuable and empowering both in academia and in the broader society. Such exercises provide a foundation for learning valuable skills as they begin talking, thinking and writing about something they know and value. Participants will understand the ways in which all cultural activities, shape and constitute their personal, academic, professional and societal identities. The second aspect includes community active citizenship and putting these new skills into practice. Service learning and active citizenship give the youth a sense of pride and ownership for the work they have completed and service they have provided to their community. The third component is the youth providing and taking positions of the youth advisory committee which are comprised of graduates of previous waves of the program. They are , again, to review, recruit, market and help plan the new activities for the upcoming wave. The fourth component of the program is to provide an opportunity for the youth to conduct a participatory project which is culturally relevant to their community. The cultural project was designed and implemented to provide opportunities for youth to exercise the skills obtained from classroom trainings and active citizenship projects. Finally the summer includes an intensive six to eight week youth leadership program for those involved in the WIA or JTPA programs of Lac Courte Oreilles. The summer program will include previous graduates to serve as counselors and/or mentors to the new wave of participants. The train the trainer concept still continues as the program waves continue coming through, and the skills which are obtained are the same from wave to wave. All methodologies then gain their significance through the recognition of works accomplished and skills obtained at the Adolescents and Families Conference (AFC) which provides vital information to professional's in the state and thereof that guide Native American youth. The AFC is culturally connected to Native Americans since 1988.

Progress 09/01/09 to 08/31/11

Outputs
OUTPUTS: The Indigenous Youth Leadership Institute facilitated by the Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwe Community College (LCOOCC) Extension Youth Development program met the needs of local youth by providing positive activities that supported social, physical, and intellectual growth. Civic engagement occurred through cultural activities which promoted Ojibwe leadership skills and knowledge. The LCO Youth Council (LCO YC) was formed in September 2010 to establish peer/group activities for youth that build camaraderie, team-building, and a sense of belonging. Meetings were held weekly to organize fundraisers and events youth chose to participate in. Some LCO YC activities included trips to Pow Wows and ValleyScare. LCO YC has reached approximately 40 youth who have attended at least one meeting. In our effort to promote healthy lifestyles in our youth by balancing the wellness triangle, we joined the LCO Indigenous Games Committee. Youth were able to participate and compete at the 2010 Indigenous Games, held in Milwaukee WI. Youth participated in activities such as archery, wrestling, running, and canoeing. Committee work included recruitment, registration, scheduling practices, fundraising, and coaching. Due to event cancellations, 15 youth were able to attend the events in Milwaukee and represent the LCO community. The Living by the Seasons curriculum was a valuable tool in increasing the awareness and use of traditional leadership and its effectiveness in today's society. This curriculum was included in the Ogiimaakaw, Summer Youth Leadership Camp offered in partnership with the LCOOCC Work Based Learning Program and the LCO Workforce Investment Act programs. Ogiimaakaw allowed youth to engage in a 6-week summer program which focused on leadership and work readiness skills. Ogiimaakaw program curriculum covered areas of team-building, communication, goal setting and career planning, job training, work readiness, and a service learning project. Over the two year life of this grant, we had 40 youth complete this summer program. Financial education was delivered through our participation in the Mad City Money events held on the LCOOCC Campus attended by 98 students of surrounding high schools. Budgeting and Planning classes were also delivered to 10 students of the LCO School enrolled in the Expanding the Circle class. Participants for youth programming were recruited through a number of methods. Flyers placed throughout local businesses and facilities, and radio announcements on WOJB helped informed youth about opportunities available. Postings on the LCOOCC webpage and a LcoYouth Council Facebook page utilized the internet as another form of disseminating information about our programming. PARTICIPANTS: LCOOCC Youth and Community Educator: Responsible for planning, organizing, coordinating, reporting, budgeting, and maintaining partnerships associated with grant programming. LCOOCC Extension Program Assistant: provides clerical support in processing purchase orders, updating facebook page, creating and distributing flyers, and also advisory/chaperone support for the LCO YC. LCOOCC Work Based Learning Director: provided organizational and financial support for the Ogiimaakaw summer youth program. The LCOOCC Work Based Learning Program sponsored field trips for career exploration and provided curriculum such as Interest Inventories, Writing Resumes, Cover Letters, and Morals in the Workplace. The LCO Workforce Investment Act provided the participants for the Ogiimaakaw program. The LCOOCC Extension Director provided opportunities for youth to attend canoe trips and shared equipment with the Youth Indigenous Institute such as flip cameras and voice recorders. Tim Stevens and Curtis DeCora provided instructional support as Ogiimaakaw instructors. TARGET AUDIENCES: The LCOOCC Indigenous Youth Leadership Institute engages Native American youth on the Lac Courte Oreilles (LCO) reservation and surrounding communities. Native Americans have the highest dropout rate in the United States estimated between 40%-50% (Kaufman, Seastrom, Sweet, and National Center for Education Statistics., 1996). This also serves true for the Hayward Community School District with a 4.598% drop out rate for Native American students which is the highest in the district (Hayward Community 2006-2007 Summary). PROJECT MODIFICATIONS: Nothing significant to report.

Impacts
Participants of our programming efforts under this grant have expressed their appreciation for the learning opportunities they received. Two participants of the Ogiimaakaw Summer Program have informed us they received their first job due to completion of our program. The LCO YC has continued its work and provides leadership/civic engagement opportunities for youth. We do not have the resources available to track the long term affects of our programming but feel a positive impact as recognition is forthcoming from the community in the form of a resolution from the Lac Courte Oreilles Tribal Governing Board officially recognizing the LCO YC as the youth representatives for the Tribe. Many community programs are approaching the LCO YC asking for their assistance in holding community events and programs.

Publications

  • No publications reported this period


Progress 09/01/09 to 08/31/10

Outputs
The LCOOCC Extension Youth Development (YD) program continues to be a fundamental segment of the LCOOCC Extension Department in achieving our vision of building better communities through education, research, and community outreach. The YD program partnered with the LCO Workforce Investment Act program and LCOOCC Work-based Learning program to offer an intense 6-week summer youth program, Ogiimaakaw. This program provided a vast array of leadership opportunities for youth in our community. The Ogiimaakaw program engaged youth in positive activities that support social, physical, and intellectual growth. In addition, youth were also provided cultural activities that promote and develop Ojibwe Leadership Knowledge and skills to encourage civic engagement. Our objective to establish peer/group activities for youth that build camaraderie, team-building and a sense of belonging were accomplished through many of the hands-on activities provided through this summer program. Team-building and Communication activities such as the Human-Knot, Reverse Pyramid, and the Building Block game, among others, thrust youth into leadership roles. We also provided activities such as canoeing, volleyball, and kickball to promote healthy lifestyles. With the assistance of the LCOOCC Extension Increased Capacity grant, youth also had an opportunity to experience cultural activities, to increase awareness/use of traditional leadership styles, such as harvesting birch bark and wiigoob (basswood rope), building a wigwam (traditional Ojibwe home), and playing the moccasin game. Ogiimaakaw also provided youth with an opportunity to experience skills in goal setting, career planning, work readiness, and job training. The College Majors Scorecard was given to assist youth in identifying a field of study they may be interested in pursuing. Participants also completed two other pieces of curriculum, Creating Youth High School Portfolio and Creating Your High School Resume. Ogiimaakaw participants also joined other LCO WIA program participants in playing Warrior Games at the conclusion of the program. The YD program also provided financial education opportunities to area youth by volunteering in the Mad City Money financial education simulation and teaching financial education lessons in collaboration with the Expanding the Circle curriculum offered at the LCO K-12 High School and the WIA Summer Youth Worker program participants. Activities such as these allow youth to experience leadership skills/styles with a hands-on approach while identifying how these skills fit into today's society. The YD program was not able to disseminate a program model at the Adolescence and Families Conference due to this being the first year a full program was offered. Conference organizers asked that the program run for a year and return the following year to disseminate our program model. PRODUCTS: Educational and physical activities were offered to teenage youth outside of school. Youth were given an opportunity to consider and plan their future post-high school graduation. OUTCOMES: 13 out of 21 youth completed the 6-week Ogiimaakaw Youth Leadership program. This program gave youth a positive activity to be involved in during the summer months when there is no school to occupy their time. Participants learned the process of team-building, communication, goal setting, career planning, work readiness, and job training. David Bisonette and Lewis White shared tradition Ojibwe leadership skills, giving participants a better understanding of their culture and heritage. Program evaluations completed by the youth indicated that the hands-on activities were more beneficial to learning and retaining knowledge than the written curriculum. A tour of the UW-Eau Claire campus provided students with a direct experience to what college life would be like. Participants asked many questions and 3 of them were talking about wanting to apply for college after graduation. Due to a partnership with the LCO WIA program, participants were able to earn work experience, allowing participants to list this on their resumes'. According to 1 participant, she received employment at McDonald's because of her participation in the Ogiimaakaw program. The youth expressed the feeling of family within the participation group and wanted to find a way to stay in touch after completion of the program. Discussion with the group inspired the creation of another program effort, the LCO Youth Council. Planning and recruiting efforts began to form this new group to focus on the teenage population of our community. 98 High School students from Hayward, Winter, and LCO attended the Mad City Money financial education simulation held at LCOOCC. Students learned how to manage their finances once they are independent and graduate from High School. LCO High School students enrolled in the Expanding the Circle program were taught basic financial skills and created budgets. DISSEMINATION ACTIVITIES: Information was disseminated throughout the community by flyers, emails, websites, and radio announcements. FUTURE INITIATIVES: The LCO Youth Council will sustain it's through fundraising efforts and volunteers from the community.

Impacts
We expect the youth will apply the knowledge and experience we have provided to better understand and prepare for applying to college or work after completion of high school. We also hope the youth put to use the leadership skills learned while making everyday decisions affecting their families, friends and themselves. Communication is opening between youth and community as youth are expressing their views and attitudes on a variety of topics to members of the community.

Publications

  • No publications reported this period