Source: UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA submitted to
SUSTAINABLE USE OF COASTAL AND INLAND WATERWAY RESOURCES: THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA BOATING AND WATERWAY MANAGEMENT PROGRAM
Sponsoring Institution
National Institute of Food and Agriculture
Project Status
NEW
Funding Source
Reporting Frequency
Annual
Accession No.
0217096
Grant No.
(N/A)
Project No.
FLA-FOR-004847
Proposal No.
(N/A)
Multistate No.
(N/A)
Program Code
(N/A)
Project Start Date
Jan 1, 2009
Project End Date
Sep 30, 2013
Grant Year
(N/A)
Project Director
Swett, R. A.
Recipient Organization
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
BOX 100494, JHMHC
GAINESVILLE,FL 32610
Performing Department
FOREST RESOURCES & CONSERVATION
Non Technical Summary
Coastal and inland communities throughout the world face a critical challenge: how to balance the use and protection of their waterway resources. In the U.S., the Coast Guard recognized this challenge in the early 1990s when it developed A Guide for Multiple Use Waterway Management as a response to ?escalating competition for the use of limited water space.? Similar issues and responses exist outside the U.S. as well. Forces at work in Florida, and the issues that they engender, are characteristic of those that communities face worldwide. Conditions in Florida make it an ideal location to research and test solutions for waterway-related issues. It is among the top five fastest growing states, and growth in recreational activities occurring on its waterways parallels that of its population. Florida?s coastal shoreline is linked to thousands of miles of Intracoastal Waterway, man-made canals, and natural estuarine and riverine systems, many of which are surrounded by residential and commercial development. The state?s waters are popular destinations for residents and visitors alike and, with over 1 million registered boats, recreational boating is one of the most popular waterway activities. As once pristine bay, estuarine, and river systems are transformed into ?urban seas,? complicating factors arise, such as damage to fragile seagrass meadows from increased turbidity, pollution, and prop-dredging; vessel collisions with endangered species; increased congestion and conflict between waterway users; and more frequent boating accidents and related fatalities. The growth in waterway use and shore side development challenges users, elected and appointed officials, resource managers, and planners to craft feasible management strategies and policies that sustain and protect the environment while allowing safe use and enjoyment. Effective management decisions and policies require adequate spatial and temporal information. However, the currency, accuracy, coverage, and completeness of water-based data are significantly less than much of that available for land-based research. Research products stemming from this project will include methods to characterize activities, behaviors, and physical traits on and adjacent to waterways. Decision support tools that can be used to develop best resource management practices will result. Research products also will include effective water use policies and planning methods that balance human uses with protection of the physical and biological environment. The effectiveness of such policies and planning methods will be monitored and evaluated. Controversy often accompanies resource management issues. Additional work will include methods that foster safe and environmentally sustainable choices and behaviors. The research outcomes are meant to address questions related to how, or whether, we can continue to use waterways to the extent desired while preserving aquatic and marine environments and maintaining the economic and social vitality of waterfront communities for generations to come.
Animal Health Component
50%
Research Effort Categories
Basic
20%
Applied
50%
Developmental
30%
Classification

Knowledge Area (KA)Subject of Investigation (SOI)Field of Science (FOS)Percent
1340599209025%
1340599303025%
1346099209025%
1346099303025%
Goals / Objectives
The Boating and Waterway Management Program (BWMP) research program is designed to support and enhance the surface water use planning and management activities of local, regional, and state governmental entities. Research objectives are to (a) develop and test methods to acquire spatial and temporal information on recreational use patterns and behaviors, (b) understand and predict the behaviors, characteristics, and use patterns of recreational waterway users, (c) develop and improve waterway management practices and policies, and (d) devise methods to facilitate behavioral changes that reduce human related impacts on waterway environments. The goal is that research results inform coastal management activities and policies, such as local comprehensive plans mandated by state governments. Research activities and target dates are as follows: Complete 4-County Regional Waterway Management System: 2009-1010; Develop Comprehensive Waterway Planning Framework: 2009-2013; Monitor Effectiveness of Non-Combustion Engine Zones: 2010-2013; Implement PFD Social Marketing Study: 2009-2010; Implement Boat Discharge Social Marketing Study: 2010-2011; Implement Seagrass Scarring Social Marketing Study: 2011-2012; Comparative Analysis of Recreational Boating Characterizations: 2009-2010; Vessel Traffic Studies and Risk Analysis: 2009-2010
Project Methods
Growth management and land use planning are well established, but the integration of surface water use and waterfront access management into local comprehensive plans is not (Florida Legislature 2007). To address this weakness, the history, structure, and process of land use planning in Florida and elsewhere will be analyzed with the goal of developing a framework for comprehensive waterway management and planning. Traditional elements, data themes, and tools used to achieve policy goals and objectives in land use planning will be examined and their corollaries will be developed for inclusion within a comprehensive waterway planning framework. The aforementioned Regional Waterway Management System will provide a basis of the planning framework. The policies and management actions (non-combustion engine zones, for example) that result from the RWMS will be monitored and/or evaluated to determine their effectiveness and appropriateness for inclusion in the comprehensive planning framework. Key partners in this endeavor will be the Boating and Waterways Section of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission and students and faculty with the UF Department of Urban and Regional Planning To achieve the project research objectives, methods to acquire spatial and temporal information on recreational use patterns will be developed, improved, and compared, including direct (e.g., field census/sampling/imagery/GPS) and indirect (e.g., mail/phone/internet surveys) observations, and existing datasets. The resulting events, patterns, and processes will be analyzed and synthesized using a variety of tools, such as geographic information systems, spatial analysis and statistics (e.g., ANOVA, regression, and cluster analysis). Decision support tools will be developed that facilitate management decisions and policymaking at state and local levels. Methods to promote behavioral changes that can reduce human related impacts on and within waterway environments will be developed and evaluated. One example is an ongoing Social Marketing project to determine the barriers to personal flotation device usage. Other projects, depending on the availability of funding, will include efforts to (1) decrease waste discharge by boaters in Charlotte Harbor and (2) reduce prop scarring of sea grass beds in Lee County. Although these projects will be developed and applied in specific geographic locations, the methods that result will be applicable wherever similar issues are encountered. Achieving the research objectives is dependent on collaborative partnerships with other faculty; local, state, and federal agencies; and non-governmental organizations. Additional factors include available funding opportunities and the interests of MS and PhD students. Research results will be communicated via meetings, workshops, reports, and journal articles.

Progress 10/01/11 to 09/30/12

Outputs
OUTPUTS: The Boating and Waterway Planning Work Action Group (WAG) led by the Boating and Waterway Planning Program (BWPP) coordinator (Dr. Robert Swett) organized and implemented the second statewide conference on Boating and Waterway Management, in collaboration with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission and the Florida Department of Environmental Protection. The BWPP completed a Regional Waterway Management System (RWMS) for Charlotte County, Florida and a Marine Access Siting Plan to be included as an element of Charlotte County's Comprehensive Plan 2050. The BWPP continues a study of boating impacts on the Northern Right Whale in Northwest Florida. The BWPP coordinator serves as the State contact for marine spatial planning within the National Sea Grant Network and the State contact for the Sustainable Coastal Development Program of National Sea Grant. The BWPP coordinator serves on the steering committee of the 2013 Working Waterways and Waterfronts National Symposium and the steering committee for the 2013 Joint Council of Extension Professionals Galaxy IV conference, and served on the steering committee for The Coastal Society's 23rd International Conference (2012). The BWPP coordinator currently serves as committee chair and mentor for two PhD students (one from Guatemala) and as a committee member for one other PhD student. The research topics and academic studies of these students are in line with the goals and objectives of this CRIS project. Projects include modeling social values of ecosystem services in a coastal environment, habitat restoration in a boating environment, and boating and whale interactions. The students gave oral presentations of BWPP-related research at eleven conferences and presented posters at fifteen conferences. The BWPP coordinator made presentations of BWPP research results at one international conference, one national conference (as invited panelist), one state conference, and one local conference. BWPP staff taught two 4-day trainings on Geographic Information Systems for natural resource applications. In attendance were 44 university faculty, staff and students, as well as agency personnel. PARTICIPANTS: Individuals Thomas Ruppert, investigator for the Charlotte County project. Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. NOAA Fisheries Service. Charlotte County. Florida Sea Grant. West Coast Inland Navigation District. Florida Department of Environmental Protection. National Sea Grant Law Center. Maine Sea Grant. Virginia Sea Grant. Urban Harbors Institute, UMASS Michigan Sea Grant TARGET AUDIENCES: Agencies/organizations General Public Industry Scientific/professional PROJECT MODIFICATIONS: Not relevant to this project.

Impacts
The Charlotte County Regional Waterway Management System (RWMS) provides the scientific basis and information necessary to meet the waterway management needs of waterfront neighborhoods throughout Charlotte County. To do so, field data collected and analyzed by BWPP personnel included 350 miles of navigable waterway depths and characteristics of 10,613 boats and 31,673 moorings. The Board of County Commissioners was provided with information and policy recommendations on potential waterway maintenance required to provide boats with varying levels of access from berths to secondary channels and, ultimately, to deep open, water. The Charlotte County Marine Access Siting Plan specifies the type, quantity, and location of public shore access and boating facilities needed to meet anticipated demand through 2050 while minimizing environmental impacts on sensitive marine habitat. The results are designed to assist Charlotte County determine how to (1) achieve sustainable coastal development; (2) guide future uses along its shoreline; and (3) prioritize water-dependent and water-related activities. The BWPP developed a methodology to identify, evaluate, and rank potential mooring field sites in coastal waters, and applied it in Brevard and Charlotte counties to aid comprehensive planning efforts. From Stem to Stern II, the second statewide boating and waterway management conference attracted 155 attendees and provided a unique forum to share accomplishments, discuss ideas, and consider priorities for future actions. The conference gave boating and waterways planners, managers, users and researchers the opportunity to discuss issues and to network with colleagues. Every one of the 36 pre-conference workshop participants agreed that the information was relevant and 70% plan to use it in their work activities and future projects. In a post-meeting survey, conference attendees gave the event high marks for content, organization, and networking opportunities. The University of Florida IFAS Research website featured the Boating and Waterway Planning Program's study that showed that expenditures by fishermen and divers who use artificial reef sites in six southwest Florida counties results in an annual economic output of nearly $227 million. Preliminary results from a spatial analysis of cultural ecosystem service valuation show that a broad array of social values exist across greater Sarasota Bay as identified by a wide sample of local stakeholders, with recreation, aesthetics, and biodiversity being predominant. The Boating and Waterway Planning Program continues to work with several state Sea Grant programs and NGOs to develop a National Working Waterways and Waterfronts Coalition to address the challenges facing traditional working waterfront areas. We successfully competed for U.S. Economic Development Administration funding ($250K) to create community and economic development tools for preserving working waterfronts and waterways.

Publications

  • No publications reported this period


Progress 10/01/10 to 09/30/11

Outputs
OUTPUTS: The Boating and Waterways Planning Program (BWPP) continues to assist in the development of a Maritime Management Master Plan for Brevard County, thus providing a planning tool to manage human uses within its coastal and marine environments. The BWPP completed a Regional Waterway Management System for Charlotte County and continues to develop a marine access siting plan as an element of Charlotte County's Comprehensive Plan 2050. The BWPP provided assistance to the Putnam County Waterways Committee on aspects of mooring field installation and permitting on the St. Johns River. At the request of the West Coast Inland Navigation District (WCIND) and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC), the BWPP completed a socioeconomic analysis of the impacts of artificial reefs for six SW Florida counties. The BWPP continues a two year study of boating impacts on the Northern Right Whale and completed a study that engaged the public in planning for recreational waterway access in Taylor County. The Boating and Waterway Planning Work Action Group (WAG) led by the BWPP coordinator is organizing the second statewide conference on Boating and Waterway Management (5/2012), in collaboration with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission and the Florida Department of Environmental Protection. The BWPP coordinator was asked to serve on the steering committee of The Working Waterways and Waterfronts National Symposium on Water Access 2013 to be held in Tacoma WA. The BWPP coordinator made presentations of BWPP research results at two international conferences, at five national conferences (one as invited panelist), and two local conference. Posters were presented at one international conference and two national conferences. Dr. Robert Swett (BWPP coordinator) currently serves as committee chair and mentor for two PhD students (one from Guatemala) and as a committee member for two other PhD students. The research topics and academic studies of these students are in line with the goals and objectives of this CRIS project. Projects include modeling social values of ecosystem services in a coastal environment, and habitat restoration in a boating environment. BWPP staff taught two 3-day trainings on Geographic Information Systems for natural resource applications. In attendance were 38 university faculty, staff and students, as well as agency personnel. The BWPP coordinator worked with a master's student to develop a rigorous evaluation of the longer term impacts and benefits of the workshops. The 2010-11 workshops were modified based on the results of the evaluation. The Wisconsin Sea Grant GIS Specialist and the BWPP coordinator initiated a GIS blog that promotes the use of geospatial technologies within NOAA's National Sea Grant Network (http://seagrantgis.wordpress.com/). PARTICIPANTS: Garin Davidson, investigator for the Taylor County project. Charles Sidman, PI for the Taylor County Project. Thomas Ruppert, investigator for the Charlotte County project. Don Behringer, PI for boating impacts on coral reef project. Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission NOAA Fisheries Service Charlotte County Brevard County Florida Sea Grant West Coast Inland Navigation District Florida Department of Environmental Protection TARGET AUDIENCES: Agencies/organizations General Public Industry Scientific/professional PROJECT MODIFICATIONS: Not relevant to this project.

Impacts
Research by the Boating and Waterway Planning Program (BWPP) showed that expenditures by fishermen and divers who use artificial reef sites in six southwest Florida counties results in an annual economic output of nearly $227 million. The BWPP developed a methodology to identify, evaluate, and rank potential mooring field sites in coastal waters, and applied it in Brevard County to aid comprehensive planning efforts. The Boating and Waterway Planning Work Action Group (WAG) led by the BWPP coordinator held regional workshops in southwest, southeast, northwest, and northeast Florida in collaboration with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. The approximately 200 attendees were a mix of managers, planners, policymakers, lawyers, and industry people from state, local and regional levels. The workshops consisted of professional development presentations by experts followed by a half day of strategic planning for boating and waterways in Florida. WAG members include extension agents from Brevard, Charlotte, Collier, Lee, Miami-Dade, Santa Rosa, and Taylor. The West Coast Inland Navigation District, the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, and Florida Sea Grant developed a second Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) to further institutionalize science-based principles of waterway planning and management. The first MOA resulted in the Regional Waterway Management System and savings of about $3 million in tax dollars. The Regional Waterway Management System implemented in Lee County saves tax dollars, supports effective waterway maintenance, and will help keep boats out of 1,200 acres of sensitive manatee habitat. The Boating and Waterway Planning Program is working with several state Sea Grant programs (Louisiana, Maine, Michigan, and Virginia) and NGOs to develop a National Working Waterways and Waterfronts Coalition to address the challenges facing traditional working waterfront areas. We successfully competed for U.S. Economic Development Administration funding ($250K) to create community and economic development tools for preserving working waterfronts and waterways.

Publications

  • Swett, R. A., C. F. Sidman, R. Watkins, and T. Fik. 2011. Evaluating boating safety risk for intracoastal waterways. Coastal Management 39: 613-627.
  • Swett, R., J. Stevely, C. Adams, S. Larkin, and A. Hodges. 2011. Economic impacts of artificial reefs: Manatee County. Florida Sea Grant College Program Extension Fact Sheet, SGEF180. 1 pp. University of Florida, UF/IFAS EDIS (Electronic Data Information Source) SG104.
  • Swett, R., J. Stevely, C. Adams, S. Larkin, and A. Hodges. 2011. Economic impacts of artificial reefs: Sarasota County. Florida Sea Grant College Program Extension Fact Sheet, SGEF181. 1 pp. University of Florida, UF/IFAS EDIS (Electronic Data Information Source) SG105.
  • Swett, R., J. Stevely, C. Adams, S. Larkin, and A. Hodges. 2011. Economic impacts of artificial reefs: Hillsborough County. Florida Sea Grant College Program Extension Fact Sheet, SGEF182. 1 pp. University of Florida, UF/IFAS EDIS (Electronic Data Information Source) SG106.
  • Swett, R., J. Stevely, C. Adams, S. Larkin, and A. Hodges. 2011. Economic impacts of artificial reefs: Pinellas County. Florida Sea Grant College Program Extension Fact Sheet, SGEF183. 1 pp. University of Florida, UF/IFAS EDIS (Electronic Data Information Source) SG107.
  • Swett, R., E. Staugler, C. Adams, S. Larkin, and A. Hodges. 2011. Economic impacts of artificial reefs: Charlotte County. Florida Sea Grant College Program Extension Fact Sheet, SGEF184. 1 pp. University of Florida, UF/IFAS EDIS (Electronic Data Information Source) SG108.
  • Swett, R., J. Hazell, C. Adams, S. Larkin, and A. Hodges. 2011. Economic impacts of artificial reefs: Lee County. Florida Sea Grant College Program Extension Fact Sheet, SGEF185. 1 pp. University of Florida, UF/IFAS EDIS (Electronic Data Information Source) SG109.
  • Swett, R., J. Stevely, C. Adams, S. Larkin, and A. Hodges. 2011. Economic impacts of artificial reefs: Southwest Florida. Florida Sea Grant College Program Extension Fact Sheet, SGEF186. 1 pp. University of Florida, UF/IFAS EDIS (Electronic Data Information Source) SG110.
  • Swett, R. A. 2011. Coastal and marine spatial planning. Florida Sea Grant College Program Extension Fact Sheet, SGEF178. 1 pp. University of Florida, UF/IFAS EDIS (Electronic Data Information Source) SG111.
  • Sidman, C., T. Fik, G. Davidson, A. Hodges, R. Swett, and F. Vose. 2011. Planning for waterway access in Taylor County, Florida: Residents and users speak. Florida Sea Grant Technical Paper, TP177. 38pp. University of Florida.
  • Swett, R. A., C. A. Adams, S. Larkin, A. W. Hodges and T. J. Stevens. 2011. Economic impacts of artificial reefs for six southwest Florida counties: Pinellas, Hillsborough, Manatee, Sarasota, Charlotte, and Lee. Florida Sea Grant Program Technical Paper, TP178. 140 pp. University of Florida.
  • Behringer, D. C., R. A. Swett, and T. K. Frazer. 2011. Determining coral reef impacts associated with boat anchoring and user activity in Southeast Florida. Final Report. Submitted to Southeast Florida Coral Reef Initiative and Florida Department of Environmental Protection. Miami Beach, FL. 66 pp.


Progress 10/01/09 to 09/30/10

Outputs
OUTPUTS: The BWPP helped Brevard County develop a Comprehensive Maritime Management Master Plan (CM3P) and completed a mooring field siting analysis for the county. The BWPP is developing a marine access siting plan for Charlotte County as an element for its Comprehensive Plan 2050. At the request of the West Coast Inland Navigation District (WCIND) and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC), the BWPP completed a socioeconomic analysis of the impacts of artificial reefs for six SW Florida counties. The BWPP initiated a two year study of boating impacts on the Northern Right Whale, completed a study that engaged the public in planning for recreational waterway access in Taylor County, and completed a study of boating patterns over coral reef in SE Florida. The statewide Boating and Waterways Work Action Group (WAG) led by the BWPP coordinator implemented the inaugural Southwest Florida Regional Boating and Waterways Workshop. The FWC was a co-sponsor. Over 80 people attended from local, state and federal government agencies, private businesses, marine industry associations, academia, citizen groups, and local advisory committees. The event included a facilitated strategic planning session during which participants identified and prioritized waterway issues and discussed strategies to address them. By invitation, the BWPP coordinator served on the steering committee of The Working Waterways and Waterfronts National Symposium on Water Access that was held in Portland, Maine; and, by invitation, is serving on the steering committee for the implementation of the Brevard County CM3P. The BWPP coordinator made invited presentations of BWPP research results at one national conference, at one state conference, and at one regional (within state) conference. In addition, BWPP staff provided consultations and/or presentations to 345 people with the following entities: Bay, Brevard, Charlotte, Collier, and Taylor counties, the FWC, and the WCIND. Dr. Robert Swett (BWPP coordinator) currently serves as committee chair and mentor for two PhD students (one from Guatemala), the co-chair for another PhD student (from Cameroon), and as a committee member for one masters student. In addition, four of his master's students (including, one from China and one from Guatemala) graduated in the spring and summer of 2010. The research topics and academic studies of these students are in line with the goals and objectives of this CRIS project. BWPP staff taught two 3-day trainings on Geographic Information Systems for natural resource applications. In attendance were 46 university faculty, staff and students, as well as agency personnel. The BWPP coordinator worked with a master's student to develop a rigorous evaluation of the longer term impacts and benefits of the workshops. The 2010 workshops were modified based on the results of the evaluation. The BWPP coordinator participated in a workshop of the National Sea Grant Sustainable Coastal Community Development Extension Network in Portland, ME (as Florida Sea Grant Representative), in an FSG meeting to plan statewide activities and outcomes, and a national review of the Florida Sea Grant College Program. PARTICIPANTS: Garin Davidson, investigator for the Taylor County project. Thomas Ruppert, investigator for the Brevard County and Charlotte County projects. Don Behringer, PI for boating impacts on coral reef project. Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. NOAA Fisheries Service. Charlotte County. Brevard County. Florida Sea Grant. West Coast Inland Navigation District. Florida Department of Environmental Protection. TARGET AUDIENCES: Agencies/organizations. General public. Industry. Scientific/professional. PROJECT MODIFICATIONS: Program name changed to: Boating and Waterway Planning Program. Investigator Watkins left project; replaced by Garin Davidson.

Impacts
The BWPP continues to implement its Regional Waterway Management System (RWMS) in Charlotte County. Previously, the state-approved management system resulted in an innovative state rule in Manatee and Sarasota counties that has saved taxpayers over $2.5 million dollars to date (personal communication, Executive Director, West Coast Inland Navigation District). The application of the Regional Waterway Management System in Lee County by the BWPP resulted in the adoption of Chapter 62-341.494 of the Florida Administrative Code on 2/18/2010. The state rule is innovative in that it authorizes zones to exclude vessels with combustion engines in areas of scarred seagrass in order to mitigate maintenance dredging activities in aquatic preserves. The RWMS approach helps to achieve an overall BWPP objective: an appropriate balance between waterway use and resource protection. To qualify for the state rules, environmental restoration and enhancement projects must comply with the science-based procedures and methods outlined in publications developed by Florida Sea Grant. The result is: (1) state policy based on "best available science," (2) better efficiency and effectiveness in dredging and waterway maintenance, (3) savings in dollars and staff time, and (4) better public policy through holistic, ecologically based decision-making that is predictable, fair, and cost effective. The adoption of the RWMS by the State demonstrates how science can guide waterway management activities. Furthermore, the WCIND, FDEP, and Florida Sea Grant developed a second Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) to further institutionalize science-based principles of waterway planning and management. The first MOA resulted in the Regional Waterway Management System. BWPP research that capitalized on RWMS data showed that fishermen and divers who use Southwest Florida's artificial reef sites spend nearly $275 million in the region annually. The participants in inaugural Southwest Florida Regional Boating and Waterways Workshop were overwhelmingly positive about the quality and value of the workshop and requested that it be an annual event. The BWPP Work Action Group organized and held a similar event for SE Florida in 3/2011 and is organizing one for Florida's panhandle to occur in 8/2011. As an outcome of the Working Waterways 2010 National Symposium, the BWPP coordinator is working with colleagues from several state Sea Grant programs and NGOs to develop a National Working Waterways and Waterfronts Coalition to address the challenges facing traditional working waterfront areas. Sea Grant's role is to increase the capacity of coastal communities to make informed decisions, balance diverse uses, and plan for the future of their working waterfronts and waterways. Participation in this national coalition unifies my work with a number of similar efforts across the nation so that we can continue to apply the best-available ideas and information to these emerging issues.

Publications

  • Swett, R. A. 2010. Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning, Florida Sea Grant College Program Fact Sheet, SGEF170. 2pp. University of Florida.
  • Larkin, S., C. A. Adams, J. Whitehead, R. A. Swett. WTP for artificial reefs in Florida by residents, boat owners, and the for-hire sector. 15th Biennial Conference of the International Institute of Fisheries Economics & Trade (IIFET), Montepellier, France. July 13-16, 2010. http://www.colloque.ird.fr/iifet-2010/pdf/Abstractbook_29_06.pdf


Progress 10/01/08 to 09/30/09

Outputs
OUTPUTS: The Boating and Waterway Management Program (BWMP) completed its ninth characterization of spatial and temporal patterns of recreational boating activities on Florida waterways. The ninth was for Collier County. The resulting GIS data, reports, and analyses provide policymakers, resource managers, and planners with detailed spatial and temporal information. Data was obtained via a map-based questionnaire that resulted in spatially-referenced GIS-based information to describe and analyze local boating patterns and behaviors. Such comprehensive information on boating activity was previously unavailable in most coastal communities. The West Coast Inland Navigation District and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission asked the BWMP to determine socioeconomic impacts of artificial reefs for six SW Florida counties. Surveys of three boating populations were implemented: for-hire vessel operators, resident boaters, and visiting boaters. The BWMP is now analyzing the resulting data. The BWMP held a 1-day workshop to present and obtain feedback for a planning tool designed to identify and value regionally significant maritime infrastructure in Florida. The project emphasizes the need to maintain the diverse array of components that create the infrastructure for boating activities in Florida. Twenty experts in various aspects of maritime infrastructure attended the workshop. A spatial decision-support system developed to analyze safety risk for recreational boating was used by the state to approve new boating safety zones and eliminate existing ones. NOAA is showcasing the SDSS on its new "Digital Coast" website (http://www.csc.noaa.gov/digitalcoast/action/index.html). The BWMP developed an interactive, map-based website (flmapr.org/charlottemap) that presents a navigational, historical, and environmental perspective of Charlotte County waterways. BWMP staff made presentations of BWMP research results at four international and two national conferences. In addition, BWMP staff provided consultations and/or presentations to 124 people with the following entities: Brevard, Charlotte, Lee, and Taylor counties, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, National Sea Grant, and the West Coast Inland Navigation District. Dr. Robert Swett currently serves as committee chair and mentor for one PhD student and four masters students. He also serves on the committees of one PhD student and one masters student. In addition, one of his masters students graduated in fall 2009. The research topics and academic studies of these students are in line with the goals and objectives of this CRIS project. BWMP staff taught four 3-day trainings on Geographic Information Systems for natural resource applications. In attendance were 84 university faculty, staff and students, as well as agency personnel. In 2009, 5 county marine extension faculty and their local government collaborators attended the 1st annual planning meeting of the BWMP Work Action Group. The BWMP coordinator agreed to serve on the steering committee of The Working Waterways and Waterfronts National Symposium on Water Access 2010 to be held in Portland, Maine. PARTICIPANTS: Individuals that worked on aspects of this project, in both technical and research capacities, included Dr. Robert Swett (PI) of the UF School of Forest Resources and Conservation, Thomas Ankersen of the Levin College of Law, Dr. Tim Fik of the UF Geography Department, and Drs. Charles Sidman, Russell Watkins, and Garin Davidson of Florida Sea Grant College Program. Project collaborators included Drs. Chuck Adams and Sherry Larkin of the UF Food and Resource Economics Department, Thomas Ruppert of the Levin College of Law, and Betty Staugler and Bryan Fluech of the Florida Sea Grant College Program. The role that individuals and collaborators played in project activities included implementation of research methods, both direct (e.g., field census/sampling/imagery/global positioning systems) and indirect (e.g., mail/phone/internet surveys), and analysis and synthesis of resulting datasets (and use of existing datasets) for events, patterns, and processes using a variety of tools, such as geographic information systems and spatial and statistical analysis. Partner organizations included the Florida Sea Grant College Program, the West Coast Inland Navigation District, the Florida Department of Community Affairs, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, and Bay, Charlotte and Collier Counties Training in Geographic Information Systems was provided to 30 graduates students and professional development opportunities were provided for students to gain group facilitation experience, knowledge in non-formal education, and social marketing. TARGET AUDIENCES: The Boating and Waterway Management Program advances science-based methods for comprehensive water use planning, management, and policymaking by local, regional, and state governmental entities. The need that the BWMP addresses is largely unmet in the U.S., as was recognized in 2007 by the Secretary of the Florida Department of Environmental Protection when he noted that comprehensive planning is well-established on land, but not for waterways. PROJECT MODIFICATIONS: Nothing significant to report during this reporting period.

Impacts
The BWMP is implementing its Regional Waterway Management System in Charlotte County. The state-approved management system resulted in an innovative state rule and saved taxpayers over $2.5 million dollars. Its adoption by the State demonstrates how science can guide waterway management activities. Benefits include policy based on "best available science," better efficiency and effectiveness in waterway maintenance, and better public policy through holistic, ecologically based decision-making that is predictable, fair, and cost effective. RWMS activities led to BWMP participation in State strategy meetings to forward waterway planning efforts. The development of a 5-year strategic plan for the West Coast Inland Navigation District enabled the BWMP to build comprehensive waterway management principles into that organizations daily activity. This is significant given the size of the WCIND and the influence it wields at the state level. The BWMP achieved similar success when it helped Brevard County develop its Maritime Management Master Plan and Charlotte County an element for their Comprehensive Plan 2050. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service used BWMP research to evaluate risk to manatees for a "Biological Opinion" on boat facility permitting. Other uses of BWMP research include determining the supply/demand for boating access to waterways; assessing boat traffic volume and effects on aquatic resources; and satisfying elements of local manatee protection plans. Three Florida counties are creating waterway management plans using BWMP methodologies to delineate primary service areas for public boat facilities. The State used a BWMP spatial decision-support system, developed to analyze safety risk, to approve new boating safety zones and eliminate existing ones. BWMP programmatic efforts related to waterway planning and management were highlighted by the Department of Environmental Protection in Coastal Currents and by NOAA in Coastal Services, a publication received by 8,000 coastal resource managers. Five county marine extension faculty and their local government collaborators attended the 1st annual planning meeting of the BWMP Work Action Group. Comments included: "Congratulations on facilitating a most successful meeting!! Your idea of bringing in the local contacts really added a lot of discussion, focus, and validity." An important meeting outcome was the formation of a group comprising dedicated faculty and local counterparts from different regions. This represents a step towards an ongoing BWMP priority: facilitating the wide dissemination and implementation of successful waterway management practices. Participants of four GIS workshops conducted by the BWMP were asked to evaluate the trainings and they gave them and the instructors an average score of 4.73 (1=very poor; 5=very good). General comments included: "The program of instruction and the agenda were excellent," "The assistance offered by all instructors in the hands-on application of each segment was truly professional." The positive feedback contributed to the decision of the IFAS Research and Extension Deans to provide funds for 56 faculty members to attend the training.

Publications

  • Antonini, G. A., Swett, R. A., and Fann, D. A. 2009. Maps of Lee County noticed general permit trafficshed channels and secondary channels. Florida Sea Grant College Program Fact Sheet, SGEF173. 54 pp. University of Florida.
  • Sidman, C. F., Sargent, W., Swett, R. A., Watkins, R., and Racevskis, L. 2009. The human dimension in waterway resource management: The Florida perspective. Proceedings of the Coastal Zone 09 Conference, Boston, MA, July 19-23, 2009. http://www.csc.noaa.gov/cz/2009/CZ09_Proceedings/Abstract%20PDFs/Oral .Swett.pdf
  • Sidman, C. F., Fik, T., Swett, R. A., Sargent, W., Fann, S., and Fann, D. A. 2009. A recreational characterization of Collier County, Florida. Florida Sea Grant College Program Technical Paper, TP168. 146 pp. University of Florida.
  • Fik, T. J. and Swett, R. A. 2009. Recreational boating expenditures and the economic impact of recreational boating in Bay County, Florida. Final Report. Submitted to the Bay County Board of County Commissioners. Gainesville, FL: School of Forest Resources and Conservation, University of Florida. 91 pp.
  • Swett, R. A. 2009. A regional waterway management system for balancing recreational boating and resource protection. 15th International Symposium on Society and Resource Management, Vienna, Austria. July 5-8, 2009. http://www.issrm09.info/abstractdisp_popup.phpuseprikey=Y&prikey=356 &id=1324
  • Swett, R. A., Coffin, A., Sidman, C. F., and Fann, D. A. 2008. Stakeholder education about the designation of coastal zones for the protection of the Florida Manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris): The Manatee Awareness and Protection Resource (MAPR) Web site. Journal of Extension 46(5). Article number 5TOT5, accessible at http://www.joe.org/joe/2008october/tt5.shtml.
  • Swett, R. A. and Fann, D. A. 2008. Navigational, historical, and environmental perspective of Charlotte County waterways. Florida Sea Grant College Program Extension Bulletin, SGEB63. 22 x 34 inches. University of Florida.
  • Watkins, R., Sidman, C. F., Swett, R. A., and Anderson, R. 2008. Vessel traffic study for Palm Beach County. Final Report. Submitted to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, Division of Law Enforcement, Boating and Waterways Section. Gainesville, FL: Florida Sea Grant College Program, University of Florida. 173 pp.
  • Swett, R. A., Listowski, C., and Fann, D. A. 2008. Managing waterways to balance recreational boating and resource protection. Pathways to Success: Integrating Human Dimensions into Fisheries and Wildlife Management Conference, Estes Park, CO. September 28-October 2, 2008. http://hdsubmit.homeip.net/abstractdisp_popup.phpuseprikey=Y&prikey= 204&id=240
  • Delaney, B. L., Swett, R. A., and Sidman, C. F. 2008. Developing and executing a public involvement process for waterways management in a Florida county. Pathways to Success: Integrating Human Dimensions into Fisheries and Wildlife Management, Estes Park, CO. September 28-October 2, 2008. http://hdsubmit.homeip.net/abstractdisp_popup.phpuseprikey=Y&prikey= 219&id=266
  • Jett, J. S., Thapa, B., and Swett, R. A. 2008. Boater compliance with manatee speed zones in Florida: An application of the theory of reasoned action. Pathways to Success: Integrating Human Dimensions into Fisheries and Wildlife Management, Estes Park, CO. September 28-October 2, 2008. http://hdsubmit.homeip.net/abstractdisp_popup.phpuseprikey=Y&prikey= 160&id=214
  • Swett, R. A., Sidman, C. F., Fik, T., and Sargent, W. 2009. Developing a spatially enabled inventory of recreational boats using vessel registration data. Coastal Management 37(5): 405-420.
  • Swett, R. A., Listowski, C., Fry, D., Boutelle, S., and Fann, D. A. 2009. A regional waterway management system for balancing recreational boating and resource protection. Environmental Management 43(6): 962-971.
  • Coffin, A., Swett, R. A., and Rosenbaum, M. 2009. West Coast Inland Navigation District strategic planning priorities: 2009-2013. Florida Sea Grant College Program Technical Paper, TP167. 26 pp. University of Florida.