Source: KENTUCKY STATE UNIVERSITY submitted to
KENTUCKY STATE UNIVERSITY ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION CENTER
Sponsoring Institution
National Institute of Food and Agriculture
Project Status
TERMINATED
Funding Source
Reporting Frequency
Annual
Accession No.
0209086
Grant No.
(N/A)
Project No.
KYX-30-06-01E
Proposal No.
(N/A)
Multistate No.
(N/A)
Program Code
(N/A)
Project Start Date
Oct 1, 2009
Project End Date
Sep 30, 2011
Grant Year
(N/A)
Project Director
Tsegaye, TE.
Recipient Organization
KENTUCKY STATE UNIVERSITY
(N/A)
FRANKFORT,KY 40601
Performing Department
Cooperative Extension
Non Technical Summary
Throughout the year 300 acres of Kentucky's wild lands were diligently inspected and deliberately managed. Through a thorough timber cruise a well thoughtout and peer reviewed management plan was developed and approved. As part of the timber cruise invasive species throughout the property were mapped and eradication plans were implemented. Wildlife populations of game and non-game species were estimated and steps have been taken to bolster threatened plant species and migratory bird populations. Much of the work was accomplished with the help of volunteers of all ages, interns, and KSU summer youth development programs. Throughout the year the EEC facilitates environmental education with students ranging from pre-school through graduate school. During the warmer months visitors are welcome to visit the EEC and receive a wide range of educational topics. When the weather does not permit students to visit the EEC the Mobile EEC takes the same learning opportunities to them. A staple of classes offered throughout the year include topics on: comparing the different bodies of water and watersheds present at the EEC, learning how to identify and eradicate invasive species, and many different aspects of wildlife management. Each class was offered to convey information and had the potential to instill an appreciation/respect for the world we all share; in so doing, the students were given the opportunity to learn quantitatively how science interacts in our natural world and given the opportunity to qualitatively develop a positive sustainable land ethic. The EEC was used as the focal point for a change in actions by teaching middle and high school teachers how to incorporate environmental concepts into their classes. A large portion of this week long intensive hands-on training program was devoted to GIS, GPS mapping, and exotic species identification. As a direct result of the teacher training many environmentally sound stewardship concepts were delivered to students throughout the Commonwealth. Each of the EEC educational excursion which addressed exotic and invasive species, involved our constituents being taught not only how to identify exotic species but also what role they play in the ecosystem, their history, and given hands on experience on how to eradicate certain plant species. The EEC was used to facilitate a change in conditions including: development of human resources, physical, institutional, and information resources that improve infrastructure. Throughout the year many volunteer groups established trails throughout the EEC, thus making physical improvements. This year almost 1,500 feet of ADA compliant trails were developed complete with two more teaching platforms and five educational kiosks. Developing a Mobile EEC exponentially opened the amount of contacts the center could address. The Website http://www.ksuenvironmental.org has received over 12,000 hits. The Website shares information, chain of command, experiences, mistakes and the lessons learned from them. The public is given the opportunity to make suggestions or ask for more information on any of the informational topics on the Website.
Animal Health Component
(N/A)
Research Effort Categories
Basic
(N/A)
Applied
(N/A)
Developmental
(N/A)
Classification

Knowledge Area (KA)Subject of Investigation (SOI)Field of Science (FOS)Percent
1340599106050%
1353199107025%
2132499107025%
Goals / Objectives
During the reporting period the areas of focus involved educating landowners and students of all ages about the importance of the following: watershed protection and management, aquatic and terrestrial wildlife, and weeds affecting plants. The EEC was used to facilitate several teacher training programs this summer. The National Science Foundation's Louis Stokes Alliances for Minority Participation (LSAMP) also used facilities at the EEC during this summer. LSAMP is a comprehensive, undergraduate program designed to increase substantially the quantity and quality of students, especially African American, Hispanic, and Native American students, pursuing degrees and careers in science, mathematics, engineering and technology. Fifteen minority students took part in the summer LSAMP program.
Project Methods
In-depth experience based training for 60 middle and high school teachers from across the Commonwealth also took place at the EEC. The Environmental Science Workshop focused on GIS, GPS, and exotic species, and was designed to provide training to teachers to incorporate environmental topics/issues in their school curriculum. The same U.S. Department of Agriculture grant allocated funds to cover transportation costs to bring the same teachers and their classes to the EEC. A portion of the RREA funds were allocated to support the development of the KSU-EEC Website (http://www.ksuenvironmental.org). A greater understanding of the quantity and quality of work accomplished this year can be appreciated by perusing our site.

Progress 01/01/11 to 12/31/11

Outputs
OUTPUTS: During the reporting period the areas of focus involved educating landowners and students of all ages about the importance of the following: watershed protection and management, aquatic and terrestrial wildlife, and weeds affecting plants. The EEC was used to facilitate several teacher training programs this summer. The Environmental Science Workshop focused on GIS, GPS, and exotic species, and was designed to provide training to teachers to incorporate environmental topics/issues in their school curriculum. A portion of the RREA funds were allocated to support the development of the KSU-EEC Website (http://www.ksuenvironmental.org). A greater understanding of the quantity and quality of work accomplished this year can be appreciated by perusing our site. PARTICIPANTS: Ken Bates, ARC-GIS Extension Specialist Dr. Harold Benson, Director of Land Grant Programs Dr. James Tidwell, Chair, Division of Aquaculture and EEC Cochair Dr. Charles Bennett, Dean, College of Math Science and Technology and EEC Co chair William Stilwell Coordinator and Manager EEC Several Profesional Development classes were offered at the EEC, education teacher with Porject WET and Project WILD and Growing Up Wild TARGET AUDIENCES: Our target audiences include pre kindergarten students all the up to graduate students. The EEC also emphasizes teacher education and landowner education. PROJECT MODIFICATIONS: Nothing significant to report during this reporting period.

Impacts
Throughout the year 307 acres of Kentucky's wild lands were diligently inspected and deliberately managed. Wildlife populations of game and non-game species were estimated and steps have been taken to bolster threatened plant species and migratory bird populations. Much of the work was accomplished with the help of volunteers of all ages, interns, and KSU summer youth development programs. Throughout the year the EEC facilitates environmental education with students ranging from pre-school through graduate school. During the warmer months visitors are welcome to visit the EEC and receive a wide range of educational topics. When the weather does not permit students to visit the EEC the Mobile EEC takes the same learning opportunities to them. A staple of classes offered throughout the year include topics on: comparing the different bodies of water and watersheds present at the EEC, learning how to identify and eradicate invasive species, and many different aspects of wildlife management. Each class was offered to convey information and had the potential to instill an appreciation/respect for the world we all share; in so doing, the students were given the opportunity to learn quantitatively how science interacts in our natural world and given the opportunity to qualitatively develop a positive sustainable land ethic. The EEC was used to facilitate a change in conditions including: development of human resources, physical, institutional, and information resources that improve infrastructure. Throughout the year many volunteer groups established trails throughout the EEC, thus making physical improvements. The Mobile EEC was busy throughout the year increasing the amount of contacts the center could address. The Website http://www.ksuenvironmental.org has received over 25,000 hits. The Website shares information, chain of command, experiences, mistakes and the lessons learned from them. The public is given the opportunity to make suggestions or ask for more information on any of the informational topics on the Website.

Publications

  • No publications reported this period


Progress 10/01/09 to 09/30/11

Outputs
OUTPUTS: Over the past five year reporting period the areas of focus involved educating landowners and students of all ages about the importance of the following: watershed protection and management, aquatic and terrestrial wildlife, and weeds affecting plants. Over 40,000 physical contacts have ben acquired over the life of the project. The EEC was used to facilitate many teacher training programs this summer. The Environmental Science Workshop focused on GIS, GPS, and exotic species, and was designed to provide training to teachers to incorporate environmental topics/issues in their school curriculum. A portion of the RREA funds were allocated to support the development of the KSU-EEC Website (http://www.ksuenvironmental.org). A greater understanding of the quantity and quality of work accomplished this year can be appreciated by perusing our site. PARTICIPANTS: Stilwell Coordinator and Manager Environmental Education Center Tidwell Chair Aquaculture and EEC Co Chair Bennett Dean MSTH and EEC Co Chair Tsegaye Dean CAFSSS TARGET AUDIENCES: The purpose of the Environmental Education Center (EEC) is to protect and enhance 300 acres of Kentucky's wild lands. EEC creates a collaborative learning facility which connects students, faculty, staff, and landowners to the environment through meaningful learning activities. The center will make every reasonable effort to provide access to all members of the Commonwealth while focusing on providing educational experiences that accommodate different learning abilities. The center will improve Kentucky's wild lands through land owner education and sharing an appreciation of the environment for future generations of landowners. The EEC has flourished into a resource that benefits school children of the Commonwealth, provides field instruction and research opportunities for higher education, protects Kentucky's natural resources and meets the College of Agriculture, Food Science, and Sustainable Systems high standards of excellence. The 307 acres that make up the Environmental Education Center is actively managed with environmentally sound stewardship practices. The EEC is being developed to give all students of the Commonwealth a place to learn about the environment. The Environmental Education Center is located at 1371 Little Dixie Road in Pleasureville, Kentucky. The Center includes a 1.6 acre pond, extensive rough walking trails and sites for anthropology, aquatic sciences, forestry, biology, and science education. The Mobile Environmental Education Center is available to bring some of the same educational opportunities found at the Center to schools throughout the Commonwealth. PROJECT MODIFICATIONS: Not relevant to this project.

Impacts
Throughout the year 307 acres of Kentucky's wild lands were diligently inspected and deliberately managed. Wildlife populations of game and non-game species were estimated and steps have been taken to bolster threatened plant species and migratory bird populations. Much of the work was accomplished with the help of volunteers of all ages, interns, and KSU summer youth development programs with almost one thousand volunteer hours over the life of the project. Throughout the year the EEC facilitates environmental education with students ranging from pre-school through graduate school. During the warmer months visitors are welcome to visit the EEC and receive a wide range of educational topics. When the weather does not permit students to visit the EEC the Mobile EEC takes the same learning opportunities to them. A staple of classes offered throughout the year include topics on: comparing the different bodies of water and watersheds present at the EEC, learning how to identify and eradicate invasive species, and many different aspects of wildlife management. Also many of the State offered resource management projects are often discussed. Each class was offered to convey information and had the potential to instill an appreciation/respect for the world we all share; in so doing, the students were given the opportunity to learn quantitatively how science interacts in our natural world and given the opportunity to qualitatively develop a positive sustainable land ethic. The EEC was used to facilitate a change in conditions including: development of human resources, physical, institutional, and information resources that improve infrastructure. Throughout the year many volunteer groups established trails throughout the EEC, thus making physical improvements. The Mobile EEC was busy throughout the year increasing the amount of contacts the center could address. The Website http://www.ksuenvironmental.org has received over 25,000 hits. The Website shares information, chain of command, experiences, mistakes and the lessons learned from them. The public is given the opportunity to make suggestions or ask for more information on any of the informational topics on the Website.

Publications

  • Journal Articles Barney, R.J., S.M. Clark, and E.G. Riley. 2007. Annotated List of the Leaf Beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) of Kentucky: Subfamily Cassidinae. Journal of the Kentucky Academy of Science In press.
  • Stilwell, W., Hayes D., Javed K., Porter T., Weibel C., and Tidwell J. 2007 Winter Newsletter. Quarterly. Invites and updates students and teachers across the Commonwealth regarding the EEC.
  • Stilwell, W., Abell, A., Hall, S., Vanderpool, N. Porter T., Weibel C., and Tidwell J. 2007 Spring Newsletter. Quarterly. Invites and updates students and teachers across the Commonwealth regarding the EEC.
  • Vanderpool, N., Stilwell, W. N. Porter T., Weibel C., and Tidwell J. 2007 Summer Newsletter. Quarterly. Invites and updates students and teachers across the Commonwealth regarding the EEC.
  • Barney, R.J., S.M. Clark, and E.G. Riley. 2007. Annotated list of the leaf beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) of Kentucky: Subfamily Cassidinae. Journal of the Kentucky Academy of Science 68(2):132-144.
  • Barney, R. J., S. M. Clark and E. G. Riley. 2008. Annotated list of the leaf beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) of Kentucky: Subfamilies Donaciinae and Criocerinae. Journal of the Kentucky Academy of Science 69(1): 29-36.
  • Hall, S.L. and R.J. Barney. (poster). A quantitative method for assigning abundance classifications to leaf beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) found in Kentucky. ESA Annual Meeting, Milwaukee, Aug, 2008.
  • Hall, S. L. and R. J. Barney. 2010. A Quantitative Method for Assigning Abundance Classifications to Leaf Beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) in Kentucky. Natural Areas Journal 30(1):pages unknown (in press.
  • Barney, R. J, and S. L. Hall. 2009 In press. Pachybrachis nigricornis carbonarius Haldeman (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae): Abundance, Distribution and Host Plant Associations with Legumes (Fabales: Fabaceae) in Kentucky. The Coleopterists Bulletin.
  • Hall, S.L. and R.J. Barney. 2008 In review. A quantitative method for assigning abundance classifications to leaf beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) found in Kentucky. Natural Areas Journal.
  • Hall, S.L. and R.J. Barney. (poster) Assignment of abundance classifications to leaf beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) found in Kentucky. KAS Annual Mtg, Lexington, KY. Oct., 2008.
  • Barney, R. J., S. M. Clark, and E. G. Riley. 2009. Annotated List of the Leaf Beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) of Kentucky: Subfamily Galerucinae, Tribes Galerucini and Luperini. Journal of the Kentucky Academy of Science 70:17-28
  • Barney, R. J., S. M. Clark, and E. G. Riley. 2009. Annotated List of the Leaf Beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) of Kentucky: Subfamily Galerucinae, Tribe Alticini. Journal of the Kentucky Academy of Science 70:29-55.
  • Evaluation of Genetic Variation Among Native Pawpaw Patches at the Environmental Education Center at Kentucky State University 2009 Bowie, LaQuida, Li Lu, Kirk W. Pomper, Jeremiah D. Lowe, Sheri B. Crabtree, and W. E. Stilwell. Land Grant Program, Kentucky State University, Atwood Research Facility, Frankfort, KY 40601-2355.
  • Stilwell, W., Tidwell, J., Bennett, C., Porter, T., 2007. Annual Report submitted to the Kentucky Heritage Land Conservation Fund Board.
  • Stilwell, W., Tidwell, Porter T., Bennett, C., Javed, K., Weibel C., Barney, R., Pomper, K., George F. Antonious; Tejinder S. Kochhar; and Harold R. Benson. 2007. Strategic Program Evaluation Final Resource Management Report Submitted to the Kentucky Heritage Land Conservation Fund Board
  • Barney, R.J., S.M. Clark, and E.G. Riley. 2008 In press. Annotated list of the leaf beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) of Kentucky: Subfamily Chrysomelinae. Journal of the Kentucky Academy of Science.
  • Barney, R.J., S.M. Clark, and E.G. Riley. 2008 In review. Annotated list of the leaf beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) of Kentucky: Subfamily Galerucini. Journal of the Kentucky Academy of Science.


Progress 01/01/10 to 12/31/10

Outputs
OUTPUTS: During the reporting period the areas of focus involved educating landowners and students of all ages about the importance of the following: watershed protection and management, aquatic and terrestrial wildlife, and weeds affecting plants. The EEC was used to facilitate several teacher training programs this summer. The National Science Foundation's Louis Stokes Alliances for Minority Participation (LSAMP) also used facilities at the EEC during this summer. LSAMP is a comprehensive, undergraduate program designed to increase substantially the quantity and quality of students, especially African American, Hispanic, and Native American students, pursuing degrees and careers in science, mathematics, engineering and technology. Twenty eight minority students took part in the summer LSAMP program. A portion of the RREA funds were allocated to support the development of the KSU-EEC Website (http://www.ksuenvironmental.org). A greater understanding of the quantity and quality of work accomplished this year can be appreciated by perusing our site. PARTICIPANTS: During the reporting period the areas of focus involved educating landowners and students of all ages about the importance of the following: watershed protection and management, aquatic and terrestrial wildlife, and weeds affecting plants. The EEC was used to facilitate several teacher training programs this summer. The National Science Foundation's Louis Stokes Alliances for Minority Participation (LSAMP) also used facilities at the EEC during this summer. LSAMP is a comprehensive, undergraduate program designed to increase substantially the quantity and quality of students, especially African American, Hispanic, and Native American students, pursuing degrees and careers in science, mathematics, engineering and technology. Fifteen minority students took part in the summer LSAMP program. A portion of the RREA funds were allocated to support the development of the KSU-EEC Website (http://www.ksuenvironmental.org). A greater understanding of the quantity and quality of work accomplished this year can be appreciated by perusing our site. PARTICIPANTS: Dr. Harold, Director of the Land Grant Program, serves as the Principle Investigator and as the Chair of the EEC External Advisory Committee. Dr. James Tidwell, Chair Division of Aquaculture, serves as the project contact and as Co-Chair of the EEC Internal Steering Committee. Dr. Charles Bennett, Dean of the College of Math, Science, Technology, and Health, serves as Co-Chair of the EEC Internal Steering Committee. William Stilwell, Coordinator and Manager of the EEC, oversees the property and the educational and research projects at the EEC. TARGET AUDIENCES: The target audiences includes all individuals interested in the environment. The EEC takes every opportunity to teach students, teachers, and landowners. Family oriented groups, Boy Scout leaders, Girl Scout leaders, 4-H groups, and landowners from across the Commonwealth are encouraged to use the EEC. PROJECT MODIFICATIONS: Nothing significant to report during this reporting period.

Impacts
Throughout the year 300 acres of Kentucky's wild lands were diligently inspected and deliberately managed. Through a thorough timber cruise a well thought out and peer reviewed management plan was developed and approved. As part of the timber cruise invasive species throughout the property were mapped and eradication plans were implemented. Wildlife populations of game and non-game species were estimated and steps have been taken to bolster threatened plant species and migratory bird populations. Much of the work was accomplished with the help of volunteers of all ages, interns, and KSU summer youth development programs. Throughout the year the EEC facilitates environmental education with students ranging from pre-school through graduate school. During the warmer months visitors are welcome to visit the EEC and receive a wide range of educational topics. When the weather does not permit students to visit the EEC the Mobile EEC takes the same learning opportunities to them. A staple of classes offered throughout the year include topics on: comparing the different bodies of water and watersheds present at the EEC, learning how to identify and eradicate invasive species, and many different aspects of wildlife management. Each class was offered to convey information and had the potential to instill an appreciation/respect for the world we all share; in so doing, the students were given the opportunity to learn quantitatively how science interacts in our natural world and given the opportunity to qualitatively develop a positive sustainable land ethic. The EEC was used to facilitate a change in conditions including: development of human resources, physical, institutional, and information resources that improve infrastructure. Throughout the year many volunteer groups established trails throughout the EEC, thus making physical improvements. The Mobile EEC was busy throughout the year increasing the amount of contacts the center could address. The Website http://www.ksuenvironmental.org has received over 21,454 hits. The Website shares information, chain of command, experiences, mistakes and the lessons learned from them. The public is given the opportunity to make suggestions or ask for more information on any of the informational topics on the Website.

Publications

  • Bowie, LaQuida, Li Lu, Kirk Pomper, Jeremiah Lowe, Sheri Crabtree, and William Stilwell. 2010. Evaluation of Genetic Variation Among Native Pawpaw Patches in Henry County, Kentucky. Ninth Annual Posters-At-The-Capitol Meeting Abstract Book. Page 21. http://campus.murraystate.edu/services/URSA. Durham, Jessica, Li Lu, Kirk Pomper, Jeremiah Lowe, and Sheri Crabtree. 2010. Using DNA Markers to Evaluate Genetic Diversity Among Native Pawpaw Patches in Iowa and Kentucky. Ninth Annual Posters-At-The-Capitol Meeting Abstract Book. Page 34. http://campus.murraystate.edu/services/URSA. Bowie, LaQuida, Li Lu, Kirk W. Pomper, Jeremiah D. Lowe, Sheri B. Crabtree, and William Stilwell. 2010. Evaluation of Genetic Variation Among Native Pawpaw Patches at the Environmental Education Center at Kentucky State University. Journal of the Kentucky Academy of Sciences 71: (In Press).


Progress 01/01/09 to 12/31/09

Outputs
OUTPUTS: During the reporting period the areas of focus involved educating landowners and students of all ages about the importance of the following: watershed protection and management, aquatic and terrestrial wildlife, and weeds affecting plants. The EEC was used to facilitate several teacher training programs this summer. The National Science Foundation's Louis Stokes Alliances for Minority Participation (LSAMP) also used facilities at the EEC during this summer. LSAMP is a comprehensive, undergraduate program designed to increase substantially the quantity and quality of students, especially African American, Hispanic, and Native American students, pursuing degrees and careers in science, mathematics, engineering and technology. Fifteen minority students took part in the summer LSAMP program. In-depth experience based training for 55 middle and high school teachers from across the Commonwealth also took place at the EEC. The Environmental Science Workshop focused on GIS, GPS, and exotic species, and was designed to provide training to teachers to incorporate environmental topics/issues in their school curriculum. The same U.S. Department of Agriculture grant allocated funds to cover transportation costs to bring the same teachers and their classes to the EEC. A portion of the RREA funds were allocated to support the development of the KSU-EEC Website (http://www.ksuenvironmental.org). A greater understanding of the quantity and quality of work accomplished this year can be appreciated by perusing our site. PARTICIPANTS: Dr. Harold, Director of the Land Grant Program, serves as the Principle Investigator and as the Chair of the EEC External Advisory Committee. Dr. James Tidwell, Chair Division of Aquaculture, serves as the project contact and as Co-Chair of the EEC Internal Steering Committee. Dr. Charles Bennett, Dean of the College of Math, Science, Technology, and Health, serves as Co-Chair of the EEC Internal Steering Committee. Dr. Robert Barney, Associate Research Director, and has several entomology research projects going on at the EEC. William Stilwell, Coordinator and Manager of the EEC, oversees the property and the educational and research projects at the EEC. TARGET AUDIENCES: The target audiences includes all individuals interested in the environment. The EEC takes every opportunity to teach students, teachers, and landowners. Family oriented groups, Boy Scout leaders, Girl Scout leaders, 4-H groups, and landowners from across the Commonwealth are encouraged to use the EEC. PROJECT MODIFICATIONS: Nothing significant to report during this reporting period.

Impacts
Throughout the year 300 acres of Kentucky's wild lands were diligently inspected and deliberately managed. Through a thorough timber cruise a well thoughtout and peer reviewed management plan was developed and approved. As part of the timber cruise invasive species throughout the property were mapped and eradication plans were implemented. Wildlife populations of game and non-game species were estimated and steps have been taken to bolster threatened plant species and migratory bird populations. Much of the work was accomplished with the help of volunteers of all ages, interns, and KSU summer youth development programs. Throughout the year the EEC facilitates environmental education with students ranging from pre-school through graduate school. During the warmer months visitors are welcome to visit the EEC and receive a wide range of educational topics. When the weather does not permit students to visit the EEC the Mobile EEC takes the same learning opportunities to them. A staple of classes offered throughout the year include topics on: comparing the different bodies of water and watersheds present at the EEC, learning how to identify and eradicate invasive species, and many different aspects of wildlife management. Each class was offered to convey information and had the potential to instill an appreciation/respect for the world we all share; in so doing, the students were given the opportunity to learn quantitatively how science interacts in our natural world and given the opportunity to qualitatively develop a positive sustainable land ethic. The EEC was used as the focal point for a change in actions by teaching middle and high school teachers how to incorporate environmental concepts into their classes. A large portion of this week long intensive hands-on training program was devoted to GIS, GPS mapping, and exotic species identification. As a direct result of the teacher training many environmentally sound stewardship concepts were delivered to students throughout the Commonwealth. Each of the EEC educational excursion which addressed exotic and invasive species, involved our constituents being taught not only how to identify exotic species but also what role they play in the ecosystem, their history, and given hands on experience on how to eradicate certain plant species. The EEC was used to facilitate a change in conditions including: development of human resources, physical, institutional, and information resources that improve infrastructure. Throughout the year many volunteer groups established trails throughout the EEC, thus making physical improvements. The Mobile EEC was busy throughout the year increasing the amount of contacts the center could address. The Website http://www.ksuenvironmental.org has received over 16,000 hits. The Website shares information, chain of command, experiences, mistakes and the lessons learned from them. The public is given the opportunity to make suggestions or ask for more information on any of the informational topics on the Website.

Publications

  • Barney, R. J., S. M. Clark, and E. G. Riley. 2009. Annotated List of the Leaf Beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) of Kentucky: Subfamily Galerucinae, Tribe Alticini. Journal of the Kentucky Academy of Science 70:29-55.
  • Hall, S. L. and R. J. Barney. 2010. A Quantitative Method for Assigning Abundance Classifications to Leaf Beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) in Kentucky. Natural Areas Journal 30(1):pages unknown (in press).
  • Barney, R. J., S. M. Clark, and E. G. Riley. 2009. Annotated List of the Leaf Beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) of Kentucky: Subfamily Galerucinae, Tribes Galerucini and Luperini. Journal of the Kentucky Academy of Science 70:17-28
  • Evaluation of Genetic Variation Among Native Pawpaw Patches at the Environmental Education Center at Kentucky State University. 2009. Bowie, LaQuida, Li Lu, Kirk W. Pomper, Jeremiah D. Lowe, Sheri B. Crabtree, and W. E. Stilwell. Land Grant Program, Kentucky State University, Atwood Research Facility, Frankfort, KY 40601-2355.


Progress 01/01/08 to 12/31/08

Outputs
OUTPUTS: During the reporting period the areas of focus involved educating landowners and students of all ages about the importance of the following: watershed protection and management, aquatic and terrestrial wildlife, and weeds affecting plants. The EEC was used to facilitate several teacher training programs this summer. The National Science Foundation's Louis Stokes Alliances for Minority Participation (LSAMP) also used facilities at the EEC during this summer. LSAMP is a comprehensive, undergraduate program designed to increase substantially the quantity and quality of students, especially African American, Hispanic, and Native American students, pursuing degrees and careers in science, mathematics, engineering and technology. Fifteen minority students took part in the summer LSAMP program. In-depth experience based training for 60 middle and high school teachers from across the Commonwealth also took place at the EEC. The Environmental Science Workshop focused on GIS, GPS, and exotic species, and was designed to provide training to teachers to incorporate environmental topics/issues in their school curriculum. The same U.S. Department of Agriculture grant allocated funds to cover transportation costs to bring the same teachers and their classes to the EEC. A portion of the RREA funds were allocated to support the development of the KSU-EEC Website (http://www.ksuenvironmental.org). A greater understanding of the quantity and quality of work accomplished this year can be appreciated by perusing our site. PARTICIPANTS: Dr. Harold, Director of the Land Grant Program, serves as the Principle Investigator and as the Chair of the EEC External Advisory Committee. Dr. James Tidwell, Chair Division of Aquaculture, serves as the project contact and as Co-Chair of the EEC Internal Steering Committee. Dr. Charles Bennett, Dean of the College of Math, Science, Technology, and Health, serves as Co-Chair of the EEC Internal Steering Committee. Dr. Robert Barney, Associate Research Director, and has several entomology research projects going on at the EEC. William Stilwell, Coordinator and Manager of the EEC, oversees the property and the educational and research projects at the EEC. TARGET AUDIENCES: The target audiences includes all individuals interested in the environment. The EEC takes every opportunity to teach students, teachers, and landowners. Family oriented groups, Boy Scout leaders, Girl Scout leaders, 4-H groups, and landowners from across the Commonwealth are encouraged to use the EEC. PROJECT MODIFICATIONS: Not relevant to this project.

Impacts
Throughout the year 300 acres of Kentucky's wild lands were diligently inspected and deliberately managed. Through a thorough timber cruise a well thoughtout and peer reviewed management plan was developed and approved. As part of the timber cruise invasive species throughout the property were mapped and eradication plans were implemented. Wildlife populations of game and non-game species were estimated and steps have been taken to bolster threatened plant species and migratory bird populations. Much of the work was accomplished with the help of volunteers of all ages, interns, and KSU summer youth development programs. Throughout the year the EEC facilitates environmental education with students ranging from pre-school through graduate school. During the warmer months visitors are welcome to visit the EEC and receive a wide range of educational topics. When the weather does not permit students to visit the EEC the Mobile EEC takes the same learning opportunities to them. A staple of classes offered throughout the year include topics on: comparing the different bodies of water and watersheds present at the EEC, learning how to identify and eradicate invasive species, and many different aspects of wildlife management. Each class was offered to convey information and had the potential to instill an appreciation/respect for the world we all share; in so doing, the students were given the opportunity to learn quantitatively how science interacts in our natural world and given the opportunity to qualitatively develop a positive sustainable land ethic. The EEC was used as the focal point for a change in actions by teaching middle and high school teachers how to incorporate environmental concepts into their classes. A large portion of this week long intensive hands-on training program was devoted to GIS, GPS mapping, and exotic species identification. As a direct result of the teacher training many environmentally sound stewardship concepts were delivered to students throughout the Commonwealth. Each of the EEC educational excursion which addressed exotic and invasive species, involved our constituents being taught not only how to identify exotic species but also what role they play in the ecosystem, their history, and given hands on experience on how to eradicate certain plant species. The EEC was used to facilitate a change in conditions including: development of human resources, physical, institutional, and information resources that improve infrastructure. Throughout the year many volunteer groups established trails throughout the EEC, thus making physical improvements. This year almost 1,500 feet of ADA compliant trails were developed complete with two more teaching platforms and five educational kiosks. Developing a Mobile EEC exponentially opened the amount of contacts the center could address. The Website http://www.ksuenvironmental.org has received over 12,000 hits. The Website shares information, chain of command, experiences, mistakes and the lessons learned from them. The public is given the opportunity to make suggestions or ask for more information on any of the informational topics on the Website.

Publications

  • Barney, R. J., S. M. Clark and E. G. Riley. 2008. Annotated list of the leaf beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) of Kentucky: Subfamilies Donaciinae and Criocerinae. Journal of the Kentucky Academy of Science 69(1): 29-36.
  • Hall, S.L. and R.J. Barney. 2008. Poster. Assignment of abundance classifications to leaf beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) found in Kentucky. KAS Annual Mtg, Lexington, KY. Oct., 2008.
  • Hall, S.L. and R.J. Barney. Poster. 2008. A quantitative method for assigning abundance classifications to leaf beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) found in Kentucky. ESA Annual Meeting, Milwaukee, Aug, 2008.


Progress 01/01/07 to 12/31/07

Outputs
OUTPUTS: During the reporting period, the areas of focus involved educating landowners and students of all ages about the importance of the following: watershed protection and management, aquatic and terrestrial wildlife, and weeds affecting plants. To fulfill our obligation to the funding agency responsible for acquiring the tract of land that makes up the EEC, staff from the EEC submitted a Final Resource Management Plan. As part of the plan, a complete timber survey was formulated by sampling a portion of the entire site. A Midway College student used the timber survey to complete the course requirements for her internship class. The EEC was used to facilitate several teacher-training programs this summer. The Kentucky Division of Forestry offered the Leopold Education Project (LEP) Workshop event at the EEC. The National Science Foundation's Louis Stokes Alliances for Minority Participation (LSAMP) also used facilities at the EEC. LSAMP is a comprehensive undergraduate program designed to substantially increase the quantity and quality of students, especially African American, Hispanic, and Native American students, pursuing degrees and careers in science, mathematics, engineering and technology. In-depth, experience-based training for 45 middle and high school teachers from across the Commonwealth also took place at the EEC. The Environmental Science Workshop focused on stream ecology, and was designed to provide training to encourage teachers to incorporate environmental topics/issues into their school curriculum. The same U.S. Dept. of Agriculture grant allocated funds to cover transportation costs to bring the same teachers and their classes to the EEC. Annalisa Abell, a high school intern with the REAP (Research and Extension Apprenticeship Program) Program, was mentored by researcher Sarah Hall in collecting preliminary data on different plant communities at the EEC. Annalisa and Sarah used squares made of PVC pipe (1x1m) to assess plant species richness and diversity in four different areas. In addition, they collected and analyzed soil samples for moisture, and a number of minerals important for plants. This research was part of the Biodiversity Project, whose principal investigator, Dr. Robert Barney, uses leaf beetles as an indicator of overall biodiversity in different areas around the state. Dr. Barney has collected beetles at the EEC, and will continue to do so as different management practices, especially prescribed burning, are used at the EEC to restore and enhance native plant communities. Annalisa, a high school junior from Louisville, spent six weeks with Dr. Barney and Ms. Hall as a REAP intern and presented their findings during the program's final presentations on July 28, 2007. A portion of the RREA funds were allocated to support the development of the KSU-EEC Website (http://www.ksuenvironmental.org). A greater understanding of the quantity and quality of work accomplished this year can be appreciated by perusing the site. Current accomplishments and ongoing projects are incorporated into our seasonal newsletters which are disseminated to over 900 teachers throughout the Commonwealth. PARTICIPANTS: Partner organizations include: all schools and shcool systems in our eight county service area, scouting groups, and youth groups. Many local commercial businesses have donated items throughout the year. The local busineses including: Papa Johns, Pizza Hut, McDonalds, Fazolli's, Blockbuster Video, and Subway donated items to encourage youth involvement in varrious essay contests. Collaborators and contacts have been established throughout the University. The interdisciplinary variety of teaching concepts available to the public is increasing as the EEC develops. Training and professional development opportunities have been made available to the public at the EEC. The Kentucky Division of Forestry offered a middle and high school development class involving, "The Sand County Almanac." K-12 teachers used the EEC as part of curriculum development workshop. Various indivdual land owners and groups used the EEC as an outdoor classroom, hands on lessons were offerec throughout the year. TARGET AUDIENCES: The target audience includes all individuals interested in the environment. The EEC takes every opportunity to teach the teachers. Family oriented groups, Boy Scout leaders, Girl Scout leaders, 4-H Groups, and landowners from across the Commonwealth are encouraged to use the EEC.

Impacts
Throughout the year, 300 acres of Kentucky's wild lands were diligently inspected and deliberately managed. Through a thorough timber cruise a well thought out and peer-reviewed management plan was developed and approved. As part of the timber cruise, invasive species throughout the property were mapped and eradication plans were implemented. Wildlife populations of game and non-game species were estimated and steps have been taken to bolster threatened plant species and migratory bird populations. Much of the work was accomplished with the help of volunteers of all ages, interns, and students from KSU summer youth development programs. The EEC facilitates environmental education with students ranging from pre-school through graduate school. During the warmer months, visitors are welcome, to visit the EEC and receive a wide range of educational topics. When the weather does not permit students to visit the EEC, the Mobile EEC takes the same learning opportunities to them. The majority of lessons offered throughout the year includes topics on: comparing the different bodies of water and watersheds present at the EEC, learning how to identify and eradicate invasive species, and many different aspects of wildlife management. Each class was offered to convey information and had the potential to instill an appreciation/respect for the world we all share; in so doing, the students were given the opportunity to learn quantitatively how science interacts in our natural world and given the opportunity to qualitatively develop a positive sustainable land ethic. The EEC was used as the focal point for a change in actions by teaching middle and high school teachers how to incorporate environmental concepts into their classes. By teaching the teachers, an exponential increase in the number of contacts touched by RREA funds was achieved. A large portion of this week-long intensive, hand-on training program was devoted to stream ecology. As a direct result of the teacher training, many environmentally sound stewardship concepts were delivered to students throughout the Commonwealth. Educational excursions which addressed exotic and invasive species, involved our constituents being taught not only how to identify exotic species but also what role they play in the ecosystem, their history, and then given hands on experience on how to eradicate certain plant species. The EEC was used to facilitate a change in conditions including: development of human resources, physical, and institutional. Human resources have been developed at the EEC by employing a full time forester who is learning day by day how to better educate visitors to the EEC about the natural world. Throughout the year many volunteer groups established trails throughout the EEC, thus making physical improvements. Developing the Mobile EEC and Website (http://www.ksuenvironmental.org) exponentially opened the amount of contacts the center could address as an institution.

Publications

  • Journal Articles Barney, R.J., S.M. Clark, and E.G. Riley. 2007. Annotated List of the Leaf Beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) of Kentucky: Subfamily Cassidinae. Journal of the Kentucky Academy of Science In press.
  • Newsletters Stilwell, W., Porter, T., and Weibel, C. Winter News. 2007. Quarterly. Invites and updates students and teachers across the Commonwealth regarding the EEC. 9 p.
  • Stilwell, W., Porter T., and Weibel C., Spring News. 2007. Quarterly. Invites and updates students and teachers across the Commonwealth regarding the EEC. 11 p.
  • Vanderpool, N., Stilwell, W. N. Porter T., and Weibel C., Summer News. 2007. Quarterly. Invites and updates students and teachers across the Commonwealth regarding the EEC. 10 p.
  • Papers in Proceedings Stilwell, W., Tidwell, J., Bennett, C., Porter, T., 2007. Annual Report submitted to the Kentucky Heritage Land Conservation Fund Board.
  • Stilwell, W., Tidwell, J., Porter T., Bennett, C., Javed, K., Weibel C., 2007. Strategic Program Evaluation Final Resource Management Report Submitted to the Kentucky Heritage Land Conservation Fund Board.