Source: UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA submitted to
INSECTICIDE RESISTANCE MONITORING OF CABBAGE LOOPER
Sponsoring Institution
National Institute of Food and Agriculture
Project Status
TERMINATED
Funding Source
Reporting Frequency
Annual
Accession No.
0208023
Grant No.
(N/A)
Project No.
ARZT-136844-H-31-142
Proposal No.
(N/A)
Multistate No.
(N/A)
Program Code
(N/A)
Project Start Date
Jul 1, 2006
Project End Date
Jun 30, 2007
Grant Year
(N/A)
Project Director
Kerns, D. L.
Recipient Organization
UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA
(N/A)
TUCSON,AZ 85721
Performing Department
ENTOMOLOGY
Non Technical Summary
The cabbage looper, Trichoplusia ni Hbner, is a serious key pest of leafy vegetables and cole crops in most of the vegetable growing areas of the United States. Because of heavy reliance of insecticides to control this pest in many portions of the U.S., there is concern that insecticide resistance may develop. This research will provide vital information addressing the susceptibility of cabbage looper to insecticides. Additionally, this research will also provide information on variations in cabbage looper susceptibility as an indicator of which insecticides may be more prone to having resistance develop.
Animal Health Component
100%
Research Effort Categories
Basic
(N/A)
Applied
100%
Developmental
(N/A)
Classification

Knowledge Area (KA)Subject of Investigation (SOI)Field of Science (FOS)Percent
21114991130100%
Goals / Objectives
1) Continue to monitor susceptibility of Arizona cabbage looper populations to commonly used insecticides. 2) Assessment of susceptibility of geographically separated cabbage looper populations to commonly used insecticides.
Project Methods
Objective 1) Continue to monitor susceptibility of Arizona cabbage looper populations to commonly used insecticides. Beginning in 2005 we propose to survey cabbage looper populations from Yuma and Maricopa Counties for resistance to the most commonly used insecticides for cabbage looper control. These products include spinosad, emamectin benzoate, methoxyfenozide, and indoxicarb. We will collect cabbage looper populations from throughout Yuma County and portions of Maricopa County beginning in August from leafy vegetables and cole crops, and will continue to sample populations until April or until cabbage loopers are no longer present. Cabbage looper eggs and larvae will be collected and transported to the laboratory, where the larvae will be fed an artificial diet. The F1 generation from these larvae will be tested for resistance to the previously mentioned insecticides using the techniques described by Kerns and Tellez (2000). Fifty to sixty larvae will be tested per dose. Six to ten dosages will be evaluated for each population. This data will help indicate how differences in susceptibility to these insecticides evolve seasonally. Objective 2) Assessment of susceptibility of geographically separated cabbage looper populations to commonly used insecticides. Beginning in 2005 we propose to obtain cabbage looper populations from various vegetable production areas throughout the United States and possibly northern Mexico. Populations will be obtained through the cooperation of field representatives employed by Dow AgroScience. These cabbage looper populations will be evaluated for susceptibility to the same insecticides described in Objective 1 using the same techniques. These data will be used to determine if there have been any geographical shifts in susceptibility or increased variability in response to insecticides relative to those populations described in Kerns and Tellez (2000).

Progress 07/01/06 to 06/30/07

Outputs
Dr. Kerns is no longer at the University of Arizona.

Impacts
This research will provide vital information addressing the susceptibility of cabbage looper to insecticides. Additionally, this research will also provide information on variations in cabbage looper susceptibility as an indicator of which insecticides may be more prone to having resistance develop.

Publications

  • No publications reported this period