Source: OCEANIC INSTITUTE MAKAPUU POINT submitted to
REGIONAL AQUACULTURE CENTER - CENTER FOR TROPICAL AND SUBTROPICAL AQUACULTURE
Sponsoring Institution
National Institute of Food and Agriculture
Project Status
TERMINATED
Funding Source
Reporting Frequency
Annual
Accession No.
0206873
Grant No.
2006-38500-16901
Project No.
HAWW-2006-06346
Proposal No.
2006-06346
Multistate No.
(N/A)
Program Code
CA
Project Start Date
Aug 1, 2006
Project End Date
Jul 31, 2011
Grant Year
2006
Project Director
Lee, C. S.
Recipient Organization
OCEANIC INSTITUTE MAKAPUU POINT
41-202 KALANIANAOLE HWY
WAIMANALO,HI 96795
Performing Department
(N/A)
Non Technical Summary
The Center for Tropical and Subtropical Aquaculture (CTSA) is one of five Regional Aquaculture Centers (RACs) established under Title XIV of the Agriculture and Food Act of 1980 and the Food Security Act of 1985 (Subtitle L, Sec. 1475[d]). All the RACs bear the mission of supporting aquaculture research, development, demonstration, and extension education to enhance viable and profitable aquaculture in the United States. To achieve this mission, CTSA is applying for this grant from the USDA. CTSA, jointly administered by the University of Hawaii and the Oceanic Institute, will use the grant to support research and extension activities that develop and transfer new technology to the aquaculture industry in a region that includes Hawaii and the U.S.-affilliated Pacific Islands. Four entities -- board of directors, executive committee, industry advisory council, and technical committee -- oversee project development and accomplishment of the center's stated mission. CTSA uses a multi-state and multi-institutional approach to tackle the problems impeding further development of the aquaculture industry. Every year, CTSA funds about 10 projects through the USDA grant. Each project will be reviewed by a panel to ensure its approach is scientifically sound and its result(s) will have a direct effect on the development of the region's aquaculture industry.
Animal Health Component
100%
Research Effort Categories
Basic
(N/A)
Applied
100%
Developmental
(N/A)
Classification

Knowledge Area (KA)Subject of Investigation (SOI)Field of Science (FOS)Percent
3013716106010%
3013719106010%
3013725106010%
3023725101010%
3033714108010%
3033719104016%
3113721116011%
4035230101013%
9033799303010%
Goals / Objectives
To provide support for a regional center to fund aquaculture research, development, and demonstration projects that help fulfill the mission of the Regional Aquaculture Centers, which serve to enhance development of a viable and profitable commercial aquaculture industry in the United States and the American Insular Pacific to benefit producers, consumers, and the American economy. The center will develop a region-wide program of cooperative and collaborative research as well as extension and development activities among public and private institutions that have demonstrated capabilities in support of commercial aquaculture in the United States and the American Insular Pacific.
Project Methods
The center will fund and administer research, development, and demonstration projects that are identified by aquaculture industry stakeholders and that promote industry development involving commercially viable tropical and subtropical species. To achieve this goal, the center will use the extensive resource base available in Hawaii and the American Insular Pacific. Organized to facilitate links between institutional expertise and facilities with regional research, development, and demonstration needs, the center will establish research and extension priorities and coordinate task assignment.

Progress 08/01/06 to 07/31/11

Outputs
OUTPUTS: This grant supported the regional aquaculture center in its efforts to provide a variety of services from industry and project development to information dissemination. Funds from grant number 2006-38500-16901 fully funded the projects: Inter-Institutional Coordination and Preparation of a Guam Aquaculture Development Plan; Developing Bivalve Culture in Hawaii, Yr 1; Kahala Broodstock Management; Development of Captive Culture Technology for the Yellow Tang, Year 1; Kahala Parasites and Shrimp Viruses of Concern to Pacific Aquaculture; Artificially Propagating the Feather-Duster Worm for the Marine Ornamental Trade; and Improving Outputs in the Commercial-Scale Production of Swordtails in HI, Yr 2, which were included in the CTSA FY 06 Plan of Work (PoW), and two projects, Promoting Health Management of Shrimp Aquaculture on Guam and the CNMI; and Alternative Methods for Marine Copepod Production, Yr 1, included in the FY 07 PoW, and the project: Evaluating an Engineered Biological Treatment Process for the Application of Aquaculture Waste and Wastewaters. Funds from this grant partially funded the projects: Improving Pearl Quality by Grafting Technologies and Husbandry Methods for Development of a Hatchery-Based Black Pearl Industry in Pohnpei, the FSM, Yr 1; from the FY 06 PoW, and Sea Cucumber Hatchery Production Technology Transfer in Pohnpei, the FSM, Yr 1, from the FY 2007 PoW. One of the projects included in the FY 2006 Plan of Work, Development of a Black Pearl Culture Industry in the Republic of the Marshall Islands-Addressing Critical Hatchery and Early Nursery Bottlenecks, Yr 1, was not funded due to the lack of results by similar projects funded in the past. The Guam Development project completed an 82 pg Guam Aquaculture Development Plan. The Bivalve project surveyed and selected grow-out sites for trials, and obtained import permits. The Kahala Broodstock project developed health and reproductive performance data sets comparing flow-through and RAS systems, and monitored the effects of commercial broodstock diet on maintaining reproductive condition and high-quality egg production. The Yellow Tang project established broodstock populations. The Parasites project identified and propagated parasites and conducted disease screening. The Feather-Duster Worm conducted feeding and substrate settlement trials. The Swordtail project conducted grow-out trials and disseminated information. The Health Management project conducted biosecurity audits of existing shrimp farms on Guam and CNMI and generated a site-specific executive report for each facility. The project also set up a bi-monthly surveillance program in 2 major shrimp farming facilities in Guam and Saipan. The Copepods project conducted short term controlled experiments, in which copepods from natural seawater were placed in artificial seawater. The Wastewater Treatment project characterized wastewater and conducted trial testing of a treatment. The Black Pearl project completed pearl quality assessments from the circle-test experiments. The Sea Cucumber project conducted a stock survey, collected broodstock, and began trials. PARTICIPANTS: Cheng-Sheng Lee, Ph.D. is the Executive Director of this project, who issued the subawards listed in the Outputs and Outcomes sections of this report. Partner organizations include Oceanic Institute, the University of Hawaii at Manoa, the University of Guam, and the College of Micronesia. TARGET AUDIENCES: The project served the aquaculture industry in the American Insular Pacific Region, including researchers, educators, and producers. Through its funding of aquaculture research, development, and extension education projects, CTSA supported the development of aquaculture and delivered science-based knowledge to the aquaculture community in the region. CTSA provides information including the results of research and project findings on its website, which is accessible to interested individuals in the CTSA region, the United States, and internationally. PROJECT MODIFICATIONS: Nothing significant to report during this reporting period.

Impacts
The bivalve working group met multiple times in an effort to move the DOH certification process forward. Hawaiian oysters were successfully spawned and grow-out trials began in four fishponds. Results from the Guam Development project determined that in order for the Guam aquaculture industry to achieve the high prices of its products that it needs to develop, it must focus its efforts on 3 areas: supplying live or extremely fresh, high quality seafood to the local market, supplying niche markets in which Guam has a competitive advantage and possibly supplying seed for augmenting local reef fisheries. The Kahala Broodstock project results indicated that the broodstock can be maintained in either flow-through or recirculating water supplies following quarantine procedures to eradicate ectoparasites, including Cryptocaryon irritans, to which the amberjacks are particularly prone. A commercial high-protein/high-lipid broodstock diet (Vitalis) produced by Skretting successfully supports high-quality egg production, although challenges suggest the need to further examine diets for broodstock growout and maturation. The Yellow Tang research group refined rearing protocols and determined that first feeding larvae can consume copepods. The Parasites and Viruses project determined that viral disease outbreaks in commercial shrimp farms on Oahu and Kauai are more likely linked to exposure of stocks to commodity shrimp by bird transmission or other vectors, and not currently associated with exposure to wild, virally-infected decapod crustaceans. Feather-Duster Worm feeding trials indicated that the live alga, Isochrysis galbana, produced the highest growth; the project also identified coral chips as the most cost-effective substrate for worm settlement. Swordtail survival rates were about 62 to 72% in both the control groups and those treated with 400ppm estrogen; however, insufficient numbers of male progeny were produced in the treated groups. The project provided more varieties of lyretail swordtails to farmers to diversify their products. Results from biosecurity audits conducted under the Health Management project determined that the greatest risk for some facilities is the seed imported from Asian countries; no standardized quarantine procedure is in place to minimize risk. The copepods quickly adapted to artificial seawater without visible problems, and reproduced when fed microalgae grown in natural seawater and microalgae grown in artificial seawater. Testing of the treatment developed under the Wastewaters project achieved nearly ~90% organics and >98% nitrate removal in trials. Circle marks in pearls were reduced and roundness increased through the use of simple re-grafting procedures in the Black Pearl project. Experiment results showed increases in roundness of the pearls harvested after re-grafting; roundness increased to 91.6 percent overall. The results of the broodstock search and collection in the Sea Cucumber project revealed a unique but consistent pattern of a higher abundance at night. Past studies conducted during the day may have underestimated the wild resources of the sandfish. For more information, visit www.ctsa.org

Publications

  • John W. Brown, Maria Haws, John Gourley and Randal Sablan. 2010. A Development Plan For Aquaculture on Guam. Unpublished manuscript. 75 pp.


Progress 08/01/09 to 07/31/10

Outputs
OUTPUTS: This grant supported the regional aquaculture center in its efforts to provide a variety of services from industry and project development to information dissemination. Funds from grant number 2006-38500-16901 fully funded the projects: Inter-Institutional Coordination and Preparation of a Guam Aquaculture Development Plan; Developing Bivalve Culture to Diversify and Position Hawaii as a Supplier of Safe, Premium, Edible Shellfish Products, Yr 1; Kahala Broodstock Management; Development of Captive Culture Technology for the Yellow Tang, Zebrasoma flavescens, Year 1; Kahala Parasites and Shrimp Viruses of Concern to Pacific Aquaculture; Artificially Propagating the Feather-Duster Worm, Sabellastarte spectabilis, for the Marine Ornamental Trade; and Improving Outputs in the Commercial-Scale Production of Swordtails in HI, Yr 2, which were included in the CTSA FY 2006 Annual Plan of Work, and two projects, Promoting Health Management of Shrimp Aquaculture on Guam and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI); and Alternative Methods for Marine Copepod Production, Yr 1, included in the FY 2007 Plan of Work, and the project: Evaluating an Engineered Biological Treatment Process for the Application of Aquaculture Waste and Wastewaters. Funds from this grant partially funded the projects: Improving Pearl Quality by Grafting Technologies and Husbandry Methods for Development of a Hatchery-Based Black Pearl Industry in Pohnpei, the FSM, Yr 1; from the FY 2006 Plan of Work, and Sea Cucumber Hatchery Production Technology Transfer in Pohnpei, the FSM, Yr 1, from the FY 2007 Plan of Work. One of the projects included in the FY 2006 Plan of Work, Development of a Black Pearl Culture Industry in the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) -- Addressing Critical Hatchery and Early Nursery Bottlenecks, Yr 1, was not funded, due to the lack of results by similar projects funded in the past. The Guam Development project completed the 82 pg Guam Aquaculture Development Plan. Yr 1 of the Bivalve project ended with no new activity. The Kahala Broodstock project developed health and reproductive performance data sets comparing flow-through and RAS systems at two experimental locations, and monitored the effects of commercial broodstock diet on maintaining reproductive condition and high-quality egg production. Yr 1 of the Yellow Tang project ended with no new activity. The Parasites project ended with no new activity. The Feather-Duster Worm project ended with no new activity. Yr 2 of the Swordtail project ended with no new activity. The Health Management project conducted biosecurity audits of all existing shrimp farms on Guam and CNMI and generated a site-specific executive report for each individual facility. The project also set up a bi-monthly surveillance program in two major shrimp farming facilities in Guam and Saipan to serve as models for the other operations. The Copepod project was on hold while a new PI was sought with no new activity. The Wastewater Treatment project just started with no activity to report yet. Yr 1 of the Black Pearl project ended with no new activity. Yr 1 of the Sea Cucumber project ended with no new activity. PARTICIPANTS: Cheng-Sheng Lee, Ph.D. is the Executive Director of this project, who issued the subawards listed in the Outputs and Outcomes sections of this report. Partner organizations include Oceanic Institute, the University of Hawaii at Manoa, the University of Guam, and the College of Micronesia. TARGET AUDIENCES: The project served the aquaculture industry in the American Insular Pacific Region, including researchers, educators, and producers. Through its funding of aquaculture research, development, and extension education projects, CTSA supported the development of aquaculture and delivered science-based knowledge to the aquaculture community in the region. CTSA provides information including the results of research and project findings on its website, which is accessible to interested individuals in the CTSA region, the United States, and internationally. PROJECT MODIFICATIONS: Nothing significant to report during this reporting period.

Impacts
Results from the Guam Development project determined that in order for the Guam aquaculture industry to achieve the high prices of its products that it needs to develop, it must focus its efforts on three areas: supplying live or extremely fresh and high quality seafood to the local market, supplying niche markets in which Guam has a competitive advantage and possibly supplying seed for augmenting local reef fisheries. The Kahala Broodstock project results indicated that the broodstock can be maintained in either flow-through or recirculating water supplies following suitable quarantine procedures to eradicate ectoparasites, including Cryptocaryon irritans to which the amberjacks are particularly prone. A commercial high-protein/high-lipid broodstock diet (Vitalis) produced by Skretting successfully supports high-quality egg production, although challenges with egg quality in this study suggests the need to further examine diets for broodstock growout and maturation. Results from biosecurity audits conducted under the Health Management project determined that the greatest risk for some facilities is the seed sources imported from the Asian countries, and no standardized quarantine procedure is in place to minimize such risk. The project also resulted in on-site training for sampling of shrimp tissues for specific diagnostics at all regional farms. For more information, see the CTSA Annual Accomplishment Reports under the Projects section of our website at http://www.ctsa.org.

Publications

  • Ito, M. 2010. Flaw formation mechanisms of the blacklip pearl oyster Pinctada margaritifera Linnaeus. I. circle formation. (in ms)
  • John W. Brown, Maria Haws, John Gourley and Randal Sablan. 2010. A Development Plan For Aquaculture on Guam. Unpublished manuscript. 75 pp.
  • Ito, M. 2009. Improving pearl quality by grafting and husbandry methods. Aqua Tips, Regional Notes, Center for Tropical and Subtropical Aquaculture, Hawaii, USA. 8 Pages.


Progress 08/01/08 to 07/31/09

Outputs
OUTPUTS: This grant supported the regional aquaculture center in its efforts to provide a variety of services from industry and project development to information dissemination. Funds from grant number 2006-38500-16901 fully funded the following projects: Inter-Institutional Coordination and Preparation of a Guam Aquaculture Development Plan; Developing Bivalve Culture to Diversify and Position Hawaii as a Supplier of Safe, Premium, Edible Shellfish Products, Year 1; Kahala Broodstock Management; Development of Captive Culture Technology for the Yellow Tang, Zebrasoma flavescens, Year 1; Kahala Parasites and Shrimp Viruses of Concern to Pacific Aquaculture; Artificially Propagating the Feather-Duster Worm, Sabellastarte spectabilis, for the Marine Ornamental Trade; and Improving Outputs in the Commercial-Scale Production of Swordtails in Hawaii, Year 2, which were included in the CTSA Fiscal Year 2006 Annual Plan of Work, and two projects, Promoting Health Management of Shrimp Aquaculture on Guam and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI); and Alternative Methods for Marine Copepod Production, Year 1, included in the FY 2007 Plan of Work. Funds from this grant partially funded the projects, Improving Pearl Quality by Grafting Technologies and Husbandry Methods for Development of a Hatchery-Based Black Pearl Industry in Pohnpei, the Federated States of Micronesia, Year 1; from the FY 2006 Plan of Work, and Sea Cucumber Hatchery Production Technology Transfer in Pohnpei, the Federated States of Micronesia, Year 1, from the FY 2007 Plan of Work. One of the projects included in the FY 2006 Plan of Work, Development of a Black Pearl Culture Industry in the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) -- Addressing Critical Hatchery and Early Nursery Bottlenecks, Year 1, was not funded, due to the lack of results by similar projects funded in the past. The Guam Development project conducted working group meetings to improve institutional coordination and cooperation for future implementation activities. The Bivalve project continued spawning trials with the Hawaiian Oyster and Trapezium clams, and addressed the need for a system for shellfish sanitation through a series of meetings. The Kahala Broodstock project monitored the effects of commercial broodstock diet on maintaining reproductive condition and high-quality egg production. The Yellow Tang project conducted feeding trials and formulated a high protein, low lipid diet. The Parasites project disseminated results to stakeholders at the annual CTSA meeting. The Feather-Duster Worm project ended with no new activity to report. The Swordtail project conducted growout trials and disseminated results to date through three presentations. The Health Management project conducted biosecurity audits of all existing shrimp farms on Guam. The Copepod project established a project working area and obtained cultures of the marine copepods Bestiolina, Parvocalanus, and Euterpina. The Black Pearl project completed pearl quality assessments from the circle-test experiments. The Sea Cucumber project conducted a preliminary stock survey, collected broodstock, and began spawning and rearing trials. PARTICIPANTS: Cheng-Sheng Lee, Ph.D. is the Executive Director of this project, who issued the subcontracts listed in the Outputs and Outcomes sections of this report. Partner organizations include Oceanic Institute, the University of Hawaii at Manoa, the University of Guam, and the College of Micronesia. TARGET AUDIENCES: The project served the aquaculture industry in the American Insular Pacific Region, including researchers, educators, and producers. Through its funding of aquaculture research, development, and extension education projects, CTSA supported the development of aquaculture and delivered science-based knowledge to the aquaculture community in the region. CTSA provides information including the results of research and project findings on its website, which is accessible to interested individuals in the CTSA region, the United States, and internationally. PROJECT MODIFICATIONS: Nothing significant to report during this reporting period.

Impacts
The Guam Development project obtained permitting requirements and compiled them into reports. The Bivalve project discovered in spawning trials that D. sandvichensis is viviparous, i.e., live larvae are sequestered within the female's body and are released upon spawning. The Kahala Broodstock project developed health and reproductive performance data sets comparing flow-through and RAS systems at both experimental locations. Researchers observed immediate spawning among stocks, suggesting that smaller tanks sizes (12' vs. 20' diameter) are acceptable. The Yellow Tang project demonstrated that mature egg-producing females can be identified by the development of an enlarged ovipositor, making selection of older females for stocking broodstock tanks easier. The project was successful using beakers and 200L larval rearing tanks systems to attain excellent hatch rates of 80 to 90 percent, yielding thousands of newly hatched larvae. The Parasites and Viruses project determined that viral disease outbreaks in commercial shrimp farms on Oahu and Kauai in recent years are more likely linked to exposure of stocks to commodity shrimp by bird transmission or other vectors, and not currently associated with exposure to wild, virally-infected decapod crustaceans. Results from a growout trial in the Swordtail project, in which groups treated with 500 ppm estrogen (resulting in 96 to 100 percent female sex ratio) were stocked in new tanks with introduced males to allow random mating, found highly skewed female biased sex ratios (ranging from 14:1 to 39:1). The results indicate that the collection of fry from a production tank and grading them using a scoop net may not be sufficient in collecting fry that are of the appropriate age. The same project also provided more varieties of lyretail swordtails to farmers to diversify their product lines, resulting in higher sales, even given the downturn in the freshwater ornamental business. The Health Management project determined the requirements, regulations, and methods to obtain the necessary reagent solution in the remote destination of CNMI. The Copepods project conducted short term controlled experiments, in which copepods from natural seawater were placed in artificial seawater. The copepods quickly adapted to the artificial seawater without visible problems, and reproduced both when fed microalgae grown in natural seawater and microalgae grown in artificial seawater. The Black Pearl project determined that circle marks in pearls were reduced and roundness increased through the use of simple re-grafting procedures. Experiment results showed increases in roundness of the pearls harvested after the 2nd grafting (re-grafting) compared to the pearls from the 1st grafting. The roundness increased to 91.6 percent overall. The results of the broodstock search and collection in the Sea Cucumber project revealed a unique but consistent pattern of a higher abundance at night. Past studies conducted during the daytime may have thereby underestimated the wild resources of the sandfish. For more information, see the CTSA Annual Accomplishment Reports under the Projects section of our website at http://www.ctsa.org.

Publications

  • Tamaru, M., Nasu, Borthakur, D., and McGovern-Hopkins, K. 2008. Update on the search for a gene marker for the lyretail trait in swordtails, Xiphoporus helleri. I'a O Hawai'i. Volume 2008, Issue 5. Honolulu Aquarium Society.


Progress 08/01/07 to 07/31/08

Outputs
OUTPUTS: Funds from grant number 2006-38500-16901 fully funded the following projects: Inter-Institutional Coordination and Preparation of a Guam Aquaculture Development Plan; Developing Bivalve Culture to Diversify and Position Hawaii as a Supplier of Safe, Premium, Edible Shellfish Products, Year 1; Kahala Broodstock Management; Development of Captive Culture Technology for the Yellow Tang, Zebrasoma flavescens, Year 1; Kahala Parasites and Shrimp Viruses of Concern to Pacific Aquaculture; Artificially Propagating the Feather-Duster Worm, Sabellastarte spectabilis, for the Marine Ornamental Trade; and Improving Outputs in the Commercial-Scale Production of Swordtails in Hawaii, Year 2, which were included in the CTSA Fiscal Year 2006 (20th) Annual Plan of Work; and two projects, Promoting Health Management of Shrimp Aquaculture on Guam and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI); and Alternative Methods for Marine Copepod Production, Year 1, included in the FY 2007 Plan of Work. Funds from grant number 2006-38500-16901 partially funded the projects, Improving Pearl Quality by Grafting Technologies and Husbandry Methods for Development of a Hatchery-Based Black Pearl Industry in Pohnpei, the Federated States of Micronesia, Year 1; from the FY 2006 Plan of Work, and Sea Cucumber Hatchery Production Technology Transfer in Pohnpei, the Federated States of Micronesia, Year 1, from the FY 2007 Plan of Work.. One of the projects included in the FY 2006 Plan of Work, Development of a Black Pearl Culture Industry in the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) -- Addressing Critical Hatchery and Early Nursery Bottlenecks, Year 1, was not funded, due to the lack of results by similar projects funded in the past. The ongoing Guam project conducted a working group meeting, reviewed published literature, and surveyed local farmers. The ongoing Bivalve project selected the indigenous oyster, Dendostrea sandvichensis, for broodstock and conducted spawning trials with this species. The Kahala Broodstock project was not yet initiated. The ongoing Yellow Tang project identified mature egg-producing females for stocking broodstock tanks and maintained stocks and spawning rates with a non-specific diet. The ongoing Parasites and Viruses project identified the parasite Neobenedenia sp. and propagated the parasite on tilapia and kahala. The ongoing Feather Duster Worm project identified coral chips as the most cost-effective substrate for settlement of the worms. Year 2 of the ongoing Swordtail project provided more varieties of lyretail swordtails to farmers to diversify their product lines. Year 1 of the Black Pearl project, which ended, examined grafting and husbandry methods for producing gem quality black pearls and for improving post-grafting survivorship of the oysters. Year 1 of the Sea cucumber project was initiated at the end of the current reporting period. For more information, see the 2008 Annual Accomplishment Report, which will be available for download under the Projects section of the Web site at http://www.ctsa.org. PARTICIPANTS: Cheng-Sheng Lee, Ph.D. is the Executive Director of this project, who issued the subcontracts listed in the Outputs and Outcomes sections of this report. Partner organizations include Oceanic Institute, the University of Hawaii at Manoa, the University of Guam, and the College of Micronesia. TARGET AUDIENCES: The project served the aquaculture industry in the American Insular Pacific Region, including researchers, educators, and producers. Through its funding of aquaculture research, development, and extension education projects, CTSA supported the development of aquaculture and delivered science-based knowledge to the aquaculture community in the region. CTSA provides information including the results of research and project findings on its website, which is accessible to interested individuals in the CTSA region, the United States, and internationally. PROJECT MODIFICATIONS: Nothing significant to report during this reporting period.

Impacts
Lists of current and potential species and reviews of local and federal policies were compiled under the Guam Aquaculture Development project to help inform members of the primary workgroup. The Bivalve project identified four Hawaiian fishponds on the island of Molokai and one on Oahu as potential sites for growth trials of the selected bivalve species. The Black Pearl project trained 20 local staff on Pakin Atoll in pre- and post-grafting farming methods and explained the results of the experiments conducted during Year 1 of the project. The kahala parasite identified by the Parasites and Viruses project showed faster development with increased temperatures, and that juvenile kahala were more susceptible to infection than adult tilapia, and confirmed by bioassay that the plankton samples that were collected were negative for the major shrimp viruses of concern. The Yellow Tang project attained hatch rates of 80 to 90 percent and produced sufficient numbers of eggs to initiate small-scale larval rearing trials. Results of feeding trials with five test feeds conducted under the Feather Duster Worm project indicated that the live alga, Isochrysis galbana, produced the highest growth. Survival rates in the Year 2 Swordtails project were about 62 to 72 percent in both the control groups and those treated with 400 ppm estrogen, but insufficient numbers of male progeny were produced in the treated groups.

Publications

  • No publications reported this period


Progress 08/01/06 to 07/31/07

Outputs
This grant supported the regional aquaculture center in the 12-month period ending July 31, 2007, in its efforts to provide a variety of services such as industry and project development. Funds from grant number 2006-38500-16901 were committed to support nine projects that were included in the CTSA Fiscal Year 2006 (20th) Annual Plan of Work. The following projects were funded: Developing Bivalve Culture to Diversify and Position Hawaii as a Supplier of Safe, Premium, Edible Shellfish Products, Year 1; Artificially Propagating the Feather-Duster Worm, Sabellastarte spectabilis, for the Marine Ornamental Trade; Inter-Institutional Coordination and Preparation of a Guam Aquaculture Development Plan; Kahala Broodstock Management; Kahala Parasites and Shrimp Viruses of Concern to Pacific Aquaculture; Improving Pearl Quality by Grafting Technologies and Husbandry Methods for Development of a Hatchery-Based Black Pearl Industry in Pohnpei, the Federated States of Micronesia, Year 1; Development of a Black Pearl Culture Industry in the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) -- Addressing Critical Hatchery and Early Nursery Bottlenecks, Year 1; Improving Outputs in the Commercial-Scale Production of Swordtails in Hawaii, Year 2;and Development of Captive Culture Technology for the Yellow Tang, Zebrasoma flavescens, Year 1. During the reporting period, the black pearl project in Micronesia started at the beginning of July. The other projects were expected to begin by the end of 2007. For more information, see our 2007 Annual Accomplishment Report, which will be available for download under the Projects section of our Web site at http://www.ctsa.org.

Impacts
This reporting period covers the first month of the pearl project in Micronesia during which pearl harvests and grafting experiments began. This project in Pohnpei was undertaken to find a simple and economical way to improve pearl quality and husbandry methods, crucial issues for commercial pearl farming. The FY 2006 grant also supported the project development for the FY 2006 (Year 20) Plan of Work, the joint meeting of the CTSA Industry Advisory Council and Technical Committee, and other administrative activities.

Publications

  • No publications reported this period