Source: UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA submitted to
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE MARKETING INNOVATIONS AND DEMAND ASSESSMENT
Sponsoring Institution
National Institute of Food and Agriculture
Project Status
TERMINATED
Funding Source
Reporting Frequency
Annual
Accession No.
0206244
Grant No.
(N/A)
Project No.
FLA-FRE-04357
Proposal No.
(N/A)
Multistate No.
S-1019
Program Code
(N/A)
Project Start Date
Oct 1, 2003
Project End Date
Sep 30, 2009
Grant Year
(N/A)
Project Director
Wysocki, A. F.
Recipient Organization
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
G022 MCCARTY HALL
GAINESVILLE,FL 32611
Performing Department
FOOD & RESOURCE ECONOMICS
Non Technical Summary
The produce sector in the U.S. continues to grow. Markets, however, are increasingly complex with new distribution innovations, food safety issues, retailer and wholesaler consolidation, and a changing legal environment for commodity marketing programs. International sources of supply have become more important to U.S. buyers as consumers have demanded more variety and year around supplies. Each of these areas presents promising research subjects. Changing cost structures across competing production regions, new free trade policies being implemented and new technology being developed create a high demand for research on competitiveness, market structure, and innovation. Changes in the commodity marketing strategies, such as those employed by the Washington Apple Committee, will have significant impact on many horticultural commodities that have depended heavily on marketing orders. Research on the impact of changes in promotion strategies and the development of alternatives will become important questions to the S-222 research community. A. Improved industry coordination on marketing with respect to several supply chain issues with horticulture producer groups. B. Identify costs, sources of competitiveness, and models for sustaining competitive advantage for producers and producer associations. C. Facilitate improved fruit and vegetable producer planning for markets by providing them improved understanding of market dynamics.
Animal Health Component
80%
Research Effort Categories
Basic
(N/A)
Applied
80%
Developmental
20%
Classification

Knowledge Area (KA)Subject of Investigation (SOI)Field of Science (FOS)Percent
60462303010100%
Goals / Objectives
1.To assess the evolution of Supply-Chain Management in the fruit and vegetable sector, identifying strategic organizational and marketing implications for diverse firms and specific commodity sub-sectors. 2.To analyze the relative costs and competitiveness of fruit and vegetable sub-sectors, either regionally, nationally, and/or globally, using new and established analytical paradigms which incorporate theories from business schools and other fields.
Project Methods
Common approaches are applied to assess the changes impacting the structure, vertical coordination and other priority aspects, of the fruit and vegetable industry and, thus, the opportunities available to market participants. The approach involves a joint effort among agricultural economists and, when appropriate, with other scientists. The methods and approaches are extended to evaluate economic and business changes internationally for the fruit and vegetable industry. Such extension is necessary as the globalization of the fruit and vegetable industry continues. Methods Used to Carry Out Objectives Objective 1: To assess the evolution of Supply-Chain Management in the fruit and vegetable sector, identifying strategic organizational and marketing implications for diverse firms and specific commodity sub-sectors. Methods used include: * In-depth interviews with producers, brokers, wholesalers, retailers, appropriate government agencies, and consumers. * Telephone and mail surveys. * Use of experimental auctions to assess consumer knowledge and acceptance of various produce-related issues. * Industry-wide strategic planning exercises (including SWOT analysis) with key participants in the produce sub-sector. * Creation of local working papers, presentations at local, regional, and national professional meetings. * The use of local, regional, and national workshops (this is explained in greater detail under organizational structure). Objective 2: To analyze the relative costs and competitiveness of fruit and vegetable sub-sectors, either regionally, nationally, and/or globally, using new and established analytical paradigms which incorporate theories from business schools and other fields. Methods used include: * In-depth interviews with producers, brokers, wholesalers, retailers, appropriate government agencies, and consumers to uncover true costs and benefits of a given produce issue. * Telephone and mail surveys. * The use of transportation and trans-shipment models. * Creation of local working papers, presentations at local, regional, and national professional meetings. * The use of local, regional, and national workshops (this is explained in greater detail under organizational structure).

Progress 10/01/03 to 09/30/09

Outputs
OUTPUTS: There have been numerous collaborations resulting in organized symposia at the AAEA annual meetings, the FDRS annual meetings and the SAEA annual meetings. Members of this regional research committee have collaborated on multi-state, multi-disciplinary research grant proposals. SCRI grant - Increasing Consumption of Specialty Crops: This multi-state, multi institution three year grant was funded in 2009. This Coordinated Agricultural Project aims to help producers remove postharvest impediments that are keeping consistently great tasting produce from being marketed. Our goal is to show how fresh fruits and vegetables with enhanced flavor can be successfully handled, without compromising food safety, so as to improve consumer satisfaction and thereby change their buying habits to increase consumption. Initial data collection is underway by colleagues in Horticultural Sciences and the economic feasibility and market research will begin in 2010. Beginning Farmers and Ranchers Grant: This is part of my efforts of the Small Farms Focus team in extension. I am a co-PI on this grant. This comprehensive, multi-year project addresses topics under all four of the long term goals of the Standard BFRDP projects. The topics addressed include: curriculum development, mentoring, apprenticeship and internship activities, conservation assistance, specific types of practices (sustainable and organic), resources and referrals, entrepreneurship and business training, diversification of marketing strategies, and innovative farm and ranch transfer strategies, including training for absentee landowners to bring their land into production. The overall goal of this project is to increase the number of small family vegetable farms in Florida. My role will include development of economic-related teaching and extension modules. PARTICIPANTS: Partners: James Sterns, Food and Resource Economics, University of Florida. TARGET AUDIENCES: Target audiences include: producers, distributors, processors, retailers, and consumers in the food system. PROJECT MODIFICATIONS: Nothing significant to report during this reporting period.

Impacts
To assess the evolution of Supply Chain Management in the fruit and vegetable sector, identifying strategic organizational and marketing implications for diverse firms and specific commodity sub sectors. To analyze the relative costs and competitiveness of fruit and vegetable sub-sectors, either regionally, nationally, and or globally, using new and established analytical paradigms which incorporate theories from business schools and other fields. To develop demand models for the produce sector that can be used to evaluate trade, commodity marketing programs, labeling programs, traceability systems, and structural changes in the U.S. produce markets. Wysocki, Allen (Discussant). "The Role of the Retail Sector in Promoting Sustainable Agriculture." at 2009 American Agricultural Economics Association Annual Meeting: EAAE Organized Symposium, 07/27/2009, Milwaukee, WI. (Panel). 2009 Florida Grape Growers Association: Marketing 101-What You Should Know to Succeed 2009 Florida Council of Cooperatives Annual Meeting: How Cooperatives Touch Our Lives 2009 Farm Credit Services Case Study (Florida Council of Cooperatives Leadership Conference) 2009 Economics of Bidding & Estimating (Business Tools to Improve Your Organization Series) 2009 Organizing Your Business & Determining Costs (Business Tools to Improve Your Organization Series) 2009 Closing the Deal - Selling Basics (Business Tools to Improve Your Organization Series) 2009 Collecting Financial Receivables and Budget Management (Financial Program for Hard Economic Times) 2009 Nuts and Bolts of Cooperatives (2009 Florida Small Farms Conference) 2009 Roadmap to Owning Your Own Business (2009 Florida Small Farms Conference) 2009 Supplying Intermediate Markets (2009 Florida Small Farms Conference) 2009 Developing and Communicating a Business Plan for your Hydroponics Operation (Starting a Successful Hydroponic Business Program)

Publications

  • Cardona, Jorge, Allen Wysocki, Steven Talcott. 2010. Economic Analysis of an Isolated Product Obtained from Muscadine Grape Pomace. HortTechnology. 20(1): 160-168.
  • Ge, Jiaoju, Allen F. Wysocki, and Lisa A. House. 2010. Simulation Modeling and Benefit-Cost Analysis for Technology Adoption. Lambert Academic Publishing: 84 pp. ISBN 978-3-8383-3635-0.
  • Gunderson, Michael, Allen F. Wysocki, and James A. Sterns. 2009. A Functional Evaluation of Business Models in Fresh Produce in the United States. In Wojciech J. Florkowski, Robert L. Shewfelt, Bernhard Brueckner and Stanley E. Prussia, editors: Postharvest Handling: A Systems Approach, 2nd edition. Oxford:Academic Press: (Chapter 7) pp. 129-152.
  • Toomey, Angelina, and Allen Wysocki. 2009. Distinguishing between Traditional and Online Retailing: Evaluating E-commerce with Respect to the Food System. Gainesville, FL: UF/IFAS EDIS Publication FE820. December: 4 pp. http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pdffiles/FE/FE82000.pdf


Progress 10/01/06 to 09/30/07

Outputs
OUTPUTS: This regional research committee meets on an annual basis to coordinate efforts across multi-states. The S1019 committee meets annually in person, and other times as needed to study the fruit and vegetable supply chains in the U.S. The S1019 committee plans on submitting another proposal to the National Organics Program in 2008. Extension workshop presentations are presented using PowerPoint and participants are given a set of handouts. After each presentation, the PowerPoint slides and a voiced-over presentation in flash format is made available on the Small Farms Focus Group website: http://smallfarm.ifas.ufl.edu/ Baker, Gregory, Allen Wysocki, Lisa House, Juan Batista. Presentation: Industry-Academic Partnerships by Gregory Baker, Santa Clara University, Juan C. Batista, Lisa House, and Allen F. Wysocki University of Florida. A presentation at the 2007 WERA-72 meetings in Las Vegas, NV, June 19, 2007. Wysocki, Allen F. Presentation: Developing and Communicating a Business Plan in your Agri-Tourism Operation. Presented at the Agri-Tourism In-Service Training, Live Oak, FL, January 9, 2007. Wysocki, Allen F. Presentation: Cooperatives in the Sunshine State. Presented at the 2007 Growmark Annual Conference, January 23, 2007. Wysocki, Allen F. Presentation: Pricing For Profit. Presented at the Small Farms Workshop, Live Oak, FL, February 20, 2007. Wysocki, Allen F. Presentation: Connecting with Your Customers. Presented at the Sarasota Chapter of the Florida Nursery Growers and Landscape Association Meeting, April 2, 2007. Wysocki, Allen F. Presentation: Fruit and Vegetable Marketing. Presented at the Mid-Florida Small Farms Conference, Opapka, FL, May 16, 2007. Wysocki, Allen F. Presentation: Building Your Products and Your Business. Presented as part of the Why Should I Buy From You Workshop Series, Live Oak, FL, August 22, 2007. Wysocki, Allen F. Presentation: Displays: The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly. Presented as part of the Why Should I Buy From You Workshop Series, Live Oak, FL, September 5, 2007. Wysocki, Allen F. Presentation: Cultivating and Keeping Loyal Customers. Presented as part of the Why Should I Buy From You Workshop Series, Live Oak, FL, September 19, 2007. Dissemination Numerous extension presentations in 2007, as part of the Small Farms Extension Focus Group. Presentations target small business for the purpose of increasing their knowledge in marketing, management, human resource management, and sales. PARTICIPANTS: Individuals: Allen Wysocki - PI Erika Knight - Co-PI Linda Landrum - Co-PI Partner Organizations: Florida Council of Cooperatives North Florida Research and Extension Center Santa Clara University Hillsborough County Extension Collaborators: Greg Baker Juan Batista Lisa House Laura Miller TARGET AUDIENCES: Small Farms (including vegetable, animal, foresty, ornamental) Cooperatives Agri-Tourism Educators General Ag-related businesses

Impacts
As a result of the activities and outcomes of this research area, producers gained knowledge in the areas of: cooperatives, formulating and implementing business plans, effective pricing of products, connecting with customers, marketing of fruits and vegetables, effective display techniques and effective customer retention.

Publications

  • Baker, G., Wysocki, A., House, L., and Batista, J. (2007). Industry-Academic Partnerships: Benefit or Burden?, International Food and Agribusiness Management Review (in press).


Progress 10/01/05 to 09/30/06

Outputs
This regional research committee meets on an annual basis to coordinate efforts across multi-states. The S1019 committee has just submitted a USDA grant proposal for $600,000 to study the organics industry.

Impacts
To assess the evolution of Supply Chain Management in the fruit and vegetable sector, identifying strategic organizational and marketing implications for diverse firms and specific commodity sub sectors. To analyze the relative costs and competitiveness of fruit and vegetable sub-sectors, either regionally, nationally, and or globally, using new and established analytical paradigms which incorporate theories from business schools and other fields. To develop demand models for the produce sector that can be used to evaluate trade, commodity marketing programs, labeling programs, traceability systems, and structural changes in the U.S. produce markets.

Publications

  • Wysocki, Allen F. Presentation: Finding Niche Markets. Presented at the Suwannee Valley Twilight Field Day, May 23, 2006
  • Love, Leigh Ann, James A. Sterns, Thomas H. Spreen and Allen F. Wysocki Presentation: Changing Patterns of Orange Juice Consumption in the Southern United States. Selected paper, SAEA Annual Meeting, Orlando, Fl, February 4-8, 2006.
  • Sterns, James S. Presentation: Constraining and Enabling Product Differentiation: A call for Subject Matter Research. A presentation as part of a selected organized symposium at the AAEA Annual Meeting, Long Beach, CA, July 24, 2006.
  • Wysocki, Allen F. Presentation: Helping Your Small Farmers to Develop a Business Plan. Presented at Annual IFAS Extension Symposium, May 18, 2006.