Source: TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY submitted to
IMPACT OF CLIMATE AND SOILS ON CROP SELECTION & MANAGEMENT
Sponsoring Institution
National Institute of Food and Agriculture
Project Status
TERMINATED
Funding Source
Reporting Frequency
Annual
Accession No.
0204993
Grant No.
(N/A)
Project No.
TEX07022
Proposal No.
(N/A)
Multistate No.
(N/A)
Program Code
(N/A)
Project Start Date
Aug 1, 2005
Project End Date
Sep 30, 2010
Grant Year
(N/A)
Project Director
Payne, W. A.
Recipient Organization
TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY
750 AGRONOMY RD STE 2701
COLLEGE STATION,TX 77843-0001
Performing Department
AMARILLO-TAMU AGR RES CENTER
Non Technical Summary
Climate change and variability along with decreasing profit margins require that decision tools be developed to more efficiently manage agricultural systems. This project examines soil-climate-crop interactions with a view towards developing better cropping systems in a semi-arid environment.
Animal Health Component
50%
Research Effort Categories
Basic
50%
Applied
50%
Developmental
(N/A)
Classification

Knowledge Area (KA)Subject of Investigation (SOI)Field of Science (FOS)Percent
1012410205020%
1021510102020%
1021520102020%
1021540102020%
2052410106020%
Goals / Objectives
1. The committee will develop new tactical/strategic decision tools for risk management assessment and crop production utilizing the existing NC-94 crop-climate-soil database. 2. To support the risk assessment and decision-making tools of objective 1, and to further understand crop-climate-soil interaction, further development of new and existing data and derived variables will occur to expand the database capabilities.
Project Methods
Soil, climate, and crop data from several research projects on soil hydrology, agronomy, precision agriculture, crop stress physiology, and remote sensing will be contributed to the database to help further develop decision tools.

Progress 08/01/05 to 09/30/10

Outputs
OUTPUTS: Demonstrated that canopy temperature depression can be used to robustly evaluate winter wheat cultivars for tolerance to heat and drought under Texas High Plains growing conditions. Determined likely dominant physiological mechanisms among three closely related lines contributing to stress tolerance (leaf geometry) and nighttime temperature (partial stomatal opening). Developed heuristic model that simulates leaf energy balance at night that takes into account nighttime transpiration. Demonstrated genetic variability and heritability (general combining ability) for in sorghum for the ratio of photosynthesis to stomatal conductance. Provided fairly conclusive (five years) data suggesting that cowpea can substitute for summer fallow in dryland rotations in no-till systems without affecting yields of subsequent wheat and sorghum crops, and with probable beneficial effects on soil properties. Further elucidated physiological mechanisms by which clump-spacing of dryland sorghum decreases tillering, conserves water, and increases grain yield in dry years. Provided evidence from China and Texas High Plains that none of three evapotranspiration simulation models could predict evapotranspiration, leaf area, or potential evapotranspiration of winter wheat. Demonstrated that adding ethrel spray (to induce ethylene production) and nitrogen increased photosynthesis rate, carboxylation efficiency and water-use efficiency of mustard. Demonstrated that use of specific pedotransfer functions could be used to estimate hydraulic properties of sandy soils in West Africa fairly adequately. Established spatial relations between soil properties and soil moisture, plant water status, aphid population, and maize dwarf mosaic virus. Modeled hydraulic properties of sandy soils using simple pedotransfer functions Characterized spatial variation of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity in a sandy soil. Measured effects of seeding date and water stress on yield, water use efficiency and physiological response of two wheat cultivars. Established long-term effects of fertilizer and water availability on cereal yield and soil chemical properties. Measured the effect of take-all disease on gas exchange rates and biomass in two winter wheat lines with different drought response Determined on-farm management effects on profile moisture distribution and water balance of sandy soils Established sorghum diversity for germination and coleoptile elongation under cool conditions Modeled the impacts of introducing cold-tolerant grain sorghum in Texas. Reported ethylene production of two wheat cultivars exposed to desiccation, heat, and paraquat-induced oxidation; Established genetic diversity within a cowpea core collection for phosphorus-use efficiency from rock phosphate Determined genetic variability and heritability for physiological traits related to transpiration use efficiency (photosynthesis/transpiration) in sorghum Measured planting rate effects on yield and water use of irrigated corn hybrids with different maturities. Examined water use efficiency of continuous dryland grain sorghum in response to planting date and geometry. PARTICIPANTS: S. Kang, S. R. Evett, C. A. Robinson, B.A. Stewart, M. Balota, M.D. Lazar, M. Mir, N.A.Lone, N.A.Khan, S. Samiullah, Babith Jampala, Srinivas Rao, J. Ryan, C. Manyame, C.L. Morgan, J. L. Heilman, D. Fatondji, B. Gerard, S. Mahamane, R. H. Loeppert, J.C. Miller Jr., and D. W. Reed. and S.K. Veeragoni. USDA/ARS, West Texas A&M University, Aligarh Muslim University (India), NC State University, ICARDA (Syria), Dep of Soil and Crop Science, and Dep of Horticultural Sciences, Texas A&M University, Catholic University of Louvain (Belgium). TARGET AUDIENCES: Scientists in the soil and crop sciences PROJECT MODIFICATIONS: Nothing significant to report during this reporting period.

Impacts
Climate change and variability along with decreasing profit margins require that decision tools be developed to more efficiently manage agricultural systems. This project examines soil climate crop interactions with a view towards developing better cropping systems in a semi-arid environment. The overall goal of this research has been to devise and to implement intensified, income-oriented cropping systems for the Texas High Plains that address major production constraints including drought, soil degradation, falling water tables, low commodity prices, and rising energy costs. This will be accomplished through the introduction of drought-tolerant species and cultivars, reduction of summer fallow, and increased reliance upon forage crops. Our goal is to provide producers with a range of cropping system alternatives that fit their resources and production objectives.

Publications

  • Balota, M., W.A. Payne, W. Rooney, and D. Rosenow. 2008. Gas exchange and transpiration ratio in sorghum. Crop Science 48: 2361-2371.
  • Hong Li, W.A. Payne, G.J. Michels, and C.M. Rush. 2008. Reducing plant abiotic and biotic stress: drought and attacks of greenbugs, corn leaf aphids, and virus disease in dryland sorghum. Environmental and Experimental Botany 63:305-316.
  • Balota, M., W. A. Payne, S.R. Evett, and M.D. Lazar. 2008. Morphological and physiological traits related with canopy temperature depression in three closely-related wheat lines. Crop Science. 48: 1897-1910.
  • Balota, M., W. A. Payne, S. K. Veeragoni, B. A. Stewart, and D. T. Rosenow. 2010. Respiration and Its Relationship to Germination, Emergence, and Early Growth under Cool Temperatures in Sorghum. In press, Crop Science.
  • Payne, W.A., and J.Ryan. 2010. The International Dimension of the American Society of Agronomy. American Society of Agronomy, Madison, WI. In press.
  • Payne, W.A. 2010. Are Biofuels Antithetic to Long-term Sustainability of Soil and Water Resources Advances in Agronomy 105:1-46.
  • Payne, W.A. 2010 (in press). Farming Systems and Food Security in Sub-Saharan Africa. Chapter 3 of Food Security and Soil Quality. Advances in Soil Science, CRC Press.
  • Krishnareddy, S.A. B. A. Stewart, W. A. Payne, and C. A. Robinson. 2010. Grain Sorghum Tiller Production in Clump and Uniform Planting Geometries. Journal of Crop Improvement, 24:1-46.
  • Manyame, C., C.L. Morgan, J. L. Heilman, D. Fatondji, B. Gerard and W.A. Payne. 2009. On-farm Management effects on profile moisture distribution and water balance of sandy soils grown to pearl millet in Niger. In review.
  • Mir, M.R., N.A. Khan, N.A. Lone, W.A. Payne, A.H. Mir, Asma Hassan and Viqar Ahmad. 2009. Effect of basal nitrogen application and foliar ethephon spray on morpho-physiology and productivity of mustard (Brassica juncea L. Czern and Coss). Applied biological research 11:60-65.
  • Unger, P.W., W.A. Payne, and G.A. Peterson. 2006. Water Conservation and Efficient Use. p. 39-85 In G.A.
  • Peterson, W.A. Payne and P.W. Unger (ed). 2006. Dryland Agriculture Monograph. American Society of Agronomy, Madison, WI.
  • Peterson, G.A. W.A. Payne and P.W. Unger (ed). 2006. Dryland Agriculture Monograph. American Society of Agronomy.
  • Payne, W.A. 2006. Dryland Cropping Systems of West and East Africa. p. 733-768 In G.A. Peterson, W.A. Payne and P.W. Unger (ed). Dryland Agriculture Monograph. American Society of Agronomy, Madison, WI.
  • Peterson, G.A., P.W. Unger, W.A. Payne, R. Anderson and R.L. Baumhardt. 2006. Dryland Agriculture Research Issues. p. 901-908 In G.A.
  • Manyame, C., C.L. Morgan, J. L. Heilman, D. Fatondji, B. Gerard and W.A. Payne. 2007. Modeling hydraulic properties of sandy soils of Niger using pedotransfer functions. Geoderma 141: 407-415.
  • Balota, M., W. A. Payne, S.R. Evett, and M.D. Lazar. 2007. Canopy temperature depression sampling to assess grain yield and genotypic differentiation in winter wheat. Crop Sci 47:1518-1529.
  • Manyame, Comfort. 2006. Regional Soil Water Balance in Niger as affected by Soil Management. PhD dissertation.
  • Tex Hong Li, C. Bielder, and W. A. Payne . 2006. Spatial variation of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity in a sandy soil of Niger. Proceedings, International Conference on tropical sandy soil management, Nov 2005, Khon Kaen, Thailand.
  • Guanglong Feng, Chengci Chen, and W. A. Payne. 2006. Effects of seeding date and water stress on yield, water-use efficiency and physiological response of two wheat cultivars on the dryland of Pacific Northwest in the United States. In press, Proceedings, 8th International Conference on Development of Dry Lands, Feb 25-28, 2006, Beijing, China. IDDC/CAS/FAO/ICARDA/NSFC/UNESCO & UNU.
  • Peterson, W.A. Payne and P.W. Unger (ed). 2006. Dryland Agriculture Monograph. American Society of Agronomy, Madison, WI.
  • Bissala, Y., and W.A. Payne. 2006. Effect of Pit Floor Material on Compost Quality in Semi-Arid Niger. Soil Sci. Soc. as A&M University, College Station, Texas.
  • Kang, S., W.A. Payne, S. R. Evett, C. A. Robinson, and B.A. Stewart. 2009. Simulation of Winter Wheat Evapotranspiration in Texas and Henan Using Three Models of Differing Complexity. Agricultural Water Management 96: 167-178.


Progress 01/01/07 to 12/31/07

Outputs
OUTPUTS: Analyzed and partially published data from experiments on remote sensing of canopy temperature depression (CTD) in wheat near-isogenic lines and contributing physiological mechanisms, including simulation of leaf energy balance at night. Continued experiments with high resolution thermal imagery to detect CTD differences among wheat cultivars in breeder nurseries. Submitted publication on genotypic differences among sorghum cultivars for the ratio of photosynthesis to stomatal conductance. F7 generation lines have been produced to permit further studies of the inheritance of this ratio and gene mapping as part of a recruited PhD student's research. Continued study that compares wheat/sorghum/fallow rotation with wheat/sorghum/cowpea rotation and analyzed yield data to date. Completed two studies on Placement and planting geometry effects of dryland sorghum on water- and fertilizer-use efficiency as part of two MS studies. Completed data analysis and manuscript preparation for study on Simulation of Winter Wheat Evapotranspiration in Texas and China Using Three Models of Differing Complexity. Analyzed and wrote up data on effect of ethrel spray and nitrogen on photosynthesis, carboxylation efficiency and water-use efficiency of mustard. Determined reliability of estimating hydraulic properties of sandy soils of West Africa using pedotransfer functions; published results in Geoderma. Attended annual American Association for the Advancement of Science meeting to be recognized as Fellow. Presented one oral and one poster paper at annual American Society of Agronomy meeting, two posters at annual Texas AgriLife meetings, and one paper at annual Texas Small Grains meeting in Dallas. Member of Iraq agricultural sector's evaluation team, 2007, to advise on a number of topics related to rejuvenating this sector, which employs ~80% of Iraqis. Representative to "Rebuild Iraq 2007" Conference, including special session for Anbar province in Petra, Jordan PARTICIPANTS: S. Kang, S. R. Evett, C. A. Robinson, B.A. Stewart, M. Balota, M.D. Lazar, M. Mir, N.A.Lone, N.A.Khan, S. Samiullah, Babith Jampala, Srinivas Rao, J. Ryan, C. Manyame, C.L. Morgan, J. L. Heilman, D. Fatondji, B. Gerard, S. Mahamane, R. H. Loeppert, J.C. Miller Jr., and D. W. Reed. and S.K. Veeragoni. USDA/ARS, West Texas A&M University, Aligarh Muslim University (India), NC State University, ICARDA (Syria), Dep of Soil and Crop Science, and Dep of Horticultural Sciences, Texas A&M University, Catholic University of Louvain (Belgium) TARGET AUDIENCES: Scientists in the soil and crop sciences. PROJECT MODIFICATIONS: None

Impacts
Demonstrated that canopy temperature depression can be used to robustly evaluate winter wheat cultivars for tolerance to heat and drought under Texas High Plains growing conditions. Determined likely dominant physiological mechanisms among three closely related lines contributing to stress tolerance (leaf geometry) and nighttime temperature (partial stomatal opening). Developed heuristic model that simulates leaf energy balance at night that takes into account nighttime transpiration. Demonstrated genetic variability and heritability (general combining ability) for in sorghum for the ratio of photosynthesis to stomatal conductance. Provided fairly conclusive (five years) data suggesting that cowpea can substitute for summer fallow in dryland rotations in no-till systems without affecting yields of subsequent wheat and sorghum crops, and with probable beneficial effects on soil properties. Further elucidated physiological mechanisms by which clump-spacing of dryland sorghum decreases tillering, conserves water, and increases grain yield in dry years. Provided evidence from China and Texas High Plains that none of three evapotranspiration simulation models could predict evapotranspiration, leaf area, or potential evapotranspiration of winter wheat. Demonstrated that adding ethrel spray (to induce ethylene production) and nitrogen increased photosynthesis rate, carboxylation efficiency and water-use efficiency of mustard. Demonstrated that use of specific pedotransfer functions could be used to estimate hydraulic properties of sandy soils in West Africa fairly adequately.

Publications

  • Manyame, C., C.L. Morgan, J. L. Heilman, D. Fatondji, B. Gerard and W.A. Payne. 2007. Modeling hydraulic properties of sandy soils of Niger using pedotransfer functions. Geoderma 141: 407-415
  • Balota, M., W. A. Payne, S.R. Evett, and M.D. Lazar. 2007. Canopy temperature depression sampling to assess grain yield and genotypic differentiation in winter wheat. Crop Sci 47:1518-1529.
  • Manyame, Comfort. 2006. Regional Soil Water Balance in Niger as affected by Soil Management. PhD dissertation, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas.


Progress 01/01/06 to 12/31/06

Outputs
Compared measured and modeled evapotranspiration of winter wheat in Texas and China using historical data and three models of differing complexity (FAO, ModWheat, and CERES). Examined effect of ethrel spray in association with nitrogen on photosynthesis, carboxylation efficiency and water use efficiency of mustard (brassica juncea l.). Compared morphological and physiological traits related to canopy temperature depression, and indicator of stress tolerance, in three closely-related wheat lines. Determined optimal time of sampling canopy temperature depression for yield prediction and genotypic differentiation in winter wheat. Established spatial relations between soil properties and soil moisture, plant water status, aphid population, and maize dwarf mosaic virus. Modeled hydraulic properties of sandy soils using simple pedotransfer functions Characterized spatial variation of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity in a sandy soil Measured effects of seeding date and water stress on yield, water use efficiency and physiological response of two wheat cultivars Established long-term effects of fertilizer and water availability on cereal yield and soil chemical properties Measured the effect of take-all disease on gas exchange rates and biomass in two winter wheat lines with different drought response Determined on-farm management effects on profile moisture distribution and water balance of sandy soils Established sorghum diversity for germination and coleoptile elongation under cool conditions Modeled the impacts of introducing cold-tolerant grain sorghum in Texas. Reported ethylene production of two wheat cultivars exposed to desiccation, heat, and paraquat-induced oxidation; Established genetic diversity within a cowpea core collection for phosphorus-use efficiency from rock phosphate Determined genetic variability and heritability for physiological traits related to transpiration use efficiency (photosynthesis/transpiration) in sorghum Measured planting rate effects on yield and water use of irrigated corn hybrids with different maturities. Examined water use efficiency of continuous dryland grain sorghum in response to planting date and geometry.

Impacts
Climate change and variability along with decreasing profit margins require that decision tools be developed to more efficiently manage agricultural systems. This project examines soil climate crop interactions with a view towards developing better cropping systems in a semi-arid environment. The overall goal of this research has been to devise and to implement intensified, income-oriented cropping systems for the Texas High Plains that address major production constraints including drought, soil degradation, falling water tables, low commodity prices, and rising energy costs. This will be accomplished through the introduction of drought-tolerant species and cultivars, reduction of summer fallow, and increased reliance upon forage crops. Our goal is to provide producers with a range of cropping system alternatives that fit their resources and production objectives.

Publications

  • No publications reported this period


Progress 01/01/05 to 12/31/05

Outputs
A no-till cropping system study is in its third year. Based on results of an initial variety trial conducted in 2002, three cowpea varieties have been used in a three year rotation with sorghum and wheat. Cowpeas substitute for fallow in the traditional wheat/sorghum/fallow rotation. The four treatments are fallow and three cowpea varieties (early, medium, and late. Each year, yield, rainfall, soil water content and cowpea fodder digestibility have been measured. Soil organic carbon was measured in the beginning. The experiment will be continued for at least two rotations (six years). Additionally, a PhD study has been undertaken to determine genetic variability among a core collection of cowpea accessions (700) to assess phosphorus-use efficiency using rock phosphate as a phosphate source under glasshouse conditions in Bushland Texas to assess P uptake efficiency. Although the primary purpose is of this research is related to water-use efficiency of cropping systems in West Africa, our hypothesis is that results will be relevant to Fe-chlorosis resistance of cowpeas in calcareous soils of Texas.

Impacts
The overall goal of this research has been to devise and to implement intensified, income-oriented cropping systems for the Texas High Plains that address major production constraints including drought, soil degradation, falling water tables, low commodity prices, and rising energy costs. This will be accomplished through the introduction of drought-tolerant species and cultivars, reduction of summer fallow, and increased reliance upon forage crops. Our goal is to provide producers with a range of cropping system alternatives that fit their resources and production objectives.

Publications

  • Payne, W.A. 2005. Integrated Production Systems. Ogallala Aquifer Initiative. USDA/ARS College Station, TX.
  • Gandah, M., and W.A. Payne. 2005. Enhancing the Sustainability of and Intensifying Cowpea-Based Cropping Systems in Sudano-Sahelian Zones of West Africa and in the U.S. 2005 Bean/Cowpea CRSP Annual Report, Michigan State University.