Source: PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY submitted to
MULTI-STATE EVALUATION OF WINEGRAPE CULTIVARS AND CLONES
Sponsoring Institution
National Institute of Food and Agriculture
Project Status
NEW
Funding Source
Reporting Frequency
Annual
Accession No.
0202322
Grant No.
(N/A)
Project No.
PEN04060
Proposal No.
(N/A)
Multistate No.
NE-1020
Program Code
(N/A)
Project Start Date
Oct 1, 2004
Project End Date
Sep 30, 2017
Grant Year
(N/A)
Project Director
Crassweller, RO.
Recipient Organization
PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY
208 MUELLER LABORATORY
UNIVERSITY PARK,PA 16802
Performing Department
Plant Science
Non Technical Summary
The disease susceptibility of clones of the major global wine grape cultivars is unknown in the different wine grape growing regions of Pennsylvania. This work will improve the competitiveness of the Pennsylvania grape growers and wineries by providing performance and quality information that is much needed for planting decisions.
Animal Health Component
(N/A)
Research Effort Categories
Basic
(N/A)
Applied
(N/A)
Developmental
(N/A)
Classification

Knowledge Area (KA)Subject of Investigation (SOI)Field of Science (FOS)Percent
21211391160100%
Knowledge Area
212 - Pathogens and Nematodes Affecting Plants;

Subject Of Investigation
1139 - Grapes, general/other;

Field Of Science
1160 - Pathology;
Goals / Objectives
Evaluate the viticulture characteristics and wine quality potential of clones of economically significant cultivars throughout the USA. Characterize the viticultural and wine quality potential of emerging cultivars based on regional needs. Conduct explorations within and outside of the USA for new or lesser known cultivars that may have economic potential for the US wine industry.
Project Methods
This research project will test the disease susceptibility of clones of the major global cultivars and of new or previously neglected wine grape cultivars in the different wine grape growing regions within Pennsylvania.

Progress 10/01/12 to 09/30/13

Outputs
Target Audience: Commercial wine grape growers in Pennsylvania Changes/Problems: We removed Merlot vines from the planting in North East due to continued late winter injury and replaced them with the cultivar Dornfelder. What opportunities for training and professional development has the project provided? With the establishment of the new planting this year we will have a vineyard that can be utilized for pruning and training classes How have the results been disseminated to communities of interest? 2012 and 2013 PA Wine Marketing and Research Board Symposium What do you plan to do during the next reporting period to accomplish the goals? Three plantings will be maintained according to required protocol.

Impacts
What was accomplished under these goals? Test the disease susceptibility of clones of the major global cultivars and of new or previously neglected wine grape cultivars in the different wine grape growing regions of Pennsylvania. Two wine grape cultivar trials were maintained. One is located at the Fruit Research and Extension Center in Biglerville, PA and the other is located at the Lake Erie Regional Grape Research and Extension Center in North East, PA. Data was collected on phenology, vigor, yield, and growth characteristics. Selected cultivars were processed into wine by Ms. Denise Gardner in the Food Science Department. Additional samples were also utilized by Dr. Ryan Elias in Food Science for an undergraduate course. A third wine grape cultivar trial and teaching vineyard was established this past year located at the Horticulture Research Farm at the Russell E. Larson Research Farm at Rock Springs, PA. It consists of 12 different cultivars with guard rows utilized for demonstrating different training systems for student use.

Publications

  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2013 Citation: January 30, 2013  Hershey, PA. Mid-Atlantic Fruit and Vegetable Conference-Wine Grape Session. The nature of frost and what you can do about it. 35 in attendance
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2013 Citation: April 22, 2013  University Park, PA. 2013 PA Wine Marketing and Research Board Symposium. NE-1020 viticulture updates. 24 in attendance


Progress 10/01/11 to 09/30/12

Outputs
OUTPUTS: Two wine grape plantings were maintained during 2012. One was located at the Fruit Research and Extension Center (FREC) in Biglerville, PA and the other was located at the Lake Erie Regional Grape Research and Extension Center (LERGREC) in North East, PA. The planting at FREC consisted of 20 different cultivars in a randomized complete block with 4 vines per block and 6 replications. The planting at LERGREC was statistically arranged in the same fashion but only had 18 cultivars. Vidal blanc vines surrounded both plantings as guard rows. R. Crassweller organized the Wine Grape Program at the Mid-Atlantic Fruit and Vegetable Conference in Hershey, PA in February and presented a talk on the performance of the two plantings to the grape growers. D. Gardner made a presentation at the same meeting on the results of the vintage from the plantings. B. Hed made a presentation titled "Grape Disease Research Update". N. Halbrendt made a presentation titled "Powdery and Downy Mildew Research" and M. Chien made a presentation titled "Bird Management in Vineyards". A research symposium was held on May 23 at University Park where the Pennsylvania Wine Marketing and Research Board was invited to hear presentations on the wine grape research being conducted in the Mid-Atlantic region. Crassweller participated in a summer field day for growers from PA and NY on July 25 at the LERGREC site planting of the NE-1020 Wine Grape Planting and discussed the results from the planting. The vineyards were maintained according to adopted protocols and included crop load management techniques, shoot thinning, cluster thinning, measurement of yields and vine size. Periodic surveys of both plantings by N. Halbrendt and B. Hed were conducted to determine incidence and severity of diseases by cultivar. PARTICIPANTS: Nothing significant to report during this reporting period. TARGET AUDIENCES: Nothing significant to report during this reporting period. PROJECT MODIFICATIONS: Nothing significant to report during this reporting period.

Impacts
This year was marked by an unusually early spring due to warm temperatures in March followed by several frost events in April. There was a dry period in June and early July. Bird damage was reduced at FREC this year due to the installation of netting, although there was some damage on the early ripening Muscat Ottonal. Since harvest was just recently completed at LERGREC and is still on going at FREC, the results presented are those from the previous season. At FREC the most vigorous cultivar based on pruning weight was Sangiovese. Pruning weights ranged from 1.11 kg/vine for Chancellor to 1.62 kg/vine for Sangiovese. Average shoot length was not different between cultivars. Chambourcin had the greatest number of average clusters/vine, 18.2/vine, and the greatest yield per vine, 2.79 kg. Weight of 100 berries was greatest for Barbera, 296 g, and least for Petit verdot 110 g. At LERGREC based on dormant pruning weights Marquette, MN 1235 and Norton were the most vigorous cultivars 0.93 kg, 0.66 kg and 0.80 kg, respectively. Marquette and MN 1235 had the most average number of clusters per vine. Marquette also had the highest average yield per vine but was not significantly higher than ten other cultivars. Average weight per cluster was highest for Gruner veltliner and least for MN 1235 indicating the latter had numerous but small clusters. Malbec for the second year showed late winter/early spring dieback of the cordons at LERGREC. This cultivar will be removed from the planting in the winter of 2012 and replaced in spring of 2013 with the cultivar Dornfelder. The establishment of a third cultivar planting at the Horticulture Research Farm (HRF) at Rock Springs in Central Pennsylvania was initiated in the summer of 2012. Rape seed was sown and disked under the fall, drive rows were planted with a combination of oats and hard fescue grass seed. Posts and trellis wires were installed for four different training systems as guard rows. The interior of the planting will consist of 8 replications of 4 vine panels of 12 different cultivars.

Publications

  • No publications reported this period


Progress 10/01/10 to 09/30/11

Outputs
OUTPUTS: Two wine grape plantings were maintained during 2011. One was located at the Fruit Research and Extension Center (FREC) in Biglerville, PA and the other was located at the Lake Erie Regional Grape Research and Extension Center (LERGREC) in North East, PA. The planting at FREC consisted of 20 different cultivars in a randomized complete block with 4 vines per block and 6 replications. The planting at LERGREC was statistically arranged in the same fashion but only had 18 cultivars. Vidal blanc vines surrounded both plantings as guard rows. This year was marked by an unusually warm May and June with a very dry July. September was very wet as the remnants of tropical storm Irene and Lee resulted in 16.3 inches of rain fell at FREC and 8.14 inches at LERGREC. Vines at the Fruit Research and Extension Center (FREC)in Biglerville and the Lake Erie Regional Grape Research and Extension Center (LERGREC) were pruned and pruning weights measured during the past year. Bloom phenology was monitored and initial cluster and shoot counts were collected. Shoots were thinned to four shoots per foot of canopy length. Clusters were counted post thinning to determine the number of clusters remaining per vine. Considerable bird depredation occurred to some cultivars until we were able to cover the vines with netting. All the Muscat Ottonal at FREC were lost due to bird feeding. Wine is being made from the Merlot and Albarino grapes from the FREC planting by our Extension Enologist. Cultivars to be made into wine from LERGREC are Chambourcin, Vidal blanc and Traminette. Once again the Malbec vines at LERGREC died back to the trunk. A mid-summer evaluation of the vines at FREC with Drs. Tony Wolf and Joe Fiola showed evidence of numerous vines potentially infected with Grape Vine Yellows. Malbec vines at LERGREC died back to the trunk in early spring and resprouted over the summer. At FREC the most vigorous cultivar based upon pruning weights was Syrah and Sangiovese. The least vigorous cultivar was Chancellor. At LERGREC the most vigorous cultivars based on pruning weights were Marquette and MN 1235. The least vigorous was Muscat Ottonal. Two other cultivars had low pruning weights, however these were only second year vines having been planted in 2009 rather than 2008 as the others were. In 2010 Muscat Ottonal had the greatest individual berry weight at 2.04 grams, while Malbec had the lowest at 0.91 grams. Vidal had the heaviest cluster weights at LERGREC. PARTICIPANTS: R. Crassweller is a principle investigator on this project and is responsible for overseeing the maintenance of the two plantings. N. Halbrendt and Bryan Hed provide recommendations on disease control as well as conducting research trials on cultivar susceptibility to diseases. The project is funded in part by the Pennsylvania Wine Marketing and Research Board under the guidance of the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture as a partner organization.. Collaborators in the past year are M. Chien, state Extension Educator for Wine Grapes, J. Griggs, Manager LERGREC, and T. Salada, Manager of FREC. TARGET AUDIENCES: The target audiences are the viticulture science community and the commercial wine grape producers in Pennsylvania, the Mid-Atlantic region and across the U.S. The results will be shared with these audiences at meetings and field days. An annual report is presented to the PA Wine Marketing and Research Board. PROJECT MODIFICATIONS: A midsummer evaluation of the planting at FREC revealed several vines that appear to have been infected by the Grape Yellows virus and will have to be removed. Malbec vines at LERGREC died back to the trunk again and data for these vines will not be collected in the future.

Impacts
R. Crassweller organized the Wine Grape Program at the Mid-Atlantic Fruit and Vegetable Conference in Hershey, PA in February. He participated in a summer field day for growers on July 13 at the FREC site planting of the NE-1020 Wine Grape Planting. Data was collected according to recommended protocols.

Publications

  • Hed, B., H. K. Ngugi, and J. W. Travis. 2011. Use of gibberellic acid for management of bunch rot on Chardonnay and Vignoles grapes. Plant Dis. 95:269-278.
  • Halbrendt, N. O., H. K. Ngugi, J. M. Halbrendt, and B. Jarjour. 2011. Downy mildew control with Zampro programs on wine grapes, 2010. Plant Disease Management Report 5:SMF013.
  • Halbrendt, N. O., H. K. Ngugi, J. M. Halbrendt, and B. Jarjour. 2011. Efficacy of fungicide programs for control of downy mildew on Chancellor, 2010. Plant Disease Management Report 5:SMF014.
  • Halbrendt, N. O., H. K. Ngugi, J. M. Halbrendt, B. Hed, and B. Jarjour. 2011. Evaluation of conventional and experimental fungicides for management of Botrytis and sour rots, 2010. Plant Disease Management Report 5:SMF021.
  • Halbrendt, N. O., H. K. Ngugi, J. M. Halbrendt, and B. Jarjour. 2011. Efficacy of new and non-registered fungicides for control of powdery mildew on Pinot Noir, 2010. Plant Disease Management Report 5:SMF022.
  • Hed, B. and H. K. Ngugi. 2011. Evaluation of organic fungicides for control of black rot and powdery mildew of Concord grapes, 2010. Plant Disease Management Reports 5:SMF039.
  • Hed, B. and H. K. Ngugi. 2011. Evaluation of fungicides for control of diseases of Niagara grapes, 2010. Plant Disease Management Reports 5:SMF040.
  • Hed, B. and H. K. Ngugi. 2011. Evaluation of leaf removal, gibberellic acid and fungicides for control of Botrytis bunch rot of grapes, 2010. Plant Disease Management Reports 5:SMF041.


Progress 10/01/09 to 09/30/10

Outputs
OUTPUTS: Two wine grape plantings were maintained during 2010. One was located at the Fruit Research and Extension Center (FREC) in Biglerville, PA and the other was located at the Lake Erie Regional Grape Research and Extension Center (LERGREC) in North East, PA. The planting at FREC consisted of 20 different cultivars in a randomized complete block with 4 vines per block and 6 replications. The planting at LERGREC was statistically arranged in the same fashion but only had 18 cultivars. Vidal blanc vines surrounded both plantings as guard rows. Compost was mounded around the base of the vines at FREC in late fall to protect the bud union. This year was marked by an unusually warm April resulting in an earlier than normal bloom. The average number of clusters per vine at LERGREC was lowest for Malbec and Norton (4.7 and 5.8, respectively). The cultivars with the highest number of clusters per vine were Chambourcin and MN 1235 ( 47.2 and 47.0, respectively). Mid-summer vigor ratings (scale 1 = weak, 5 = vigorous) showed that the most vigorous cultivars were La Crescent and Traminette (4.14 and 4.13, respectively. The least vigorous cultivars were Syrah, Malbec and Muscat Ottonal (2.20, 2.30 and 2.36, respectively). Malbec showed considerable winter injury to its canes. Events: R. Crassweller organized the Wine Grape Program at the Mid-Atlantic Fruit and Vegetable Conference in Hershey, PA in February. He participated in a summer field day for growers on August 23 at the FREC site planting of the NE-1020 Wine Grape Planting. He also hosted a vineyard walk through at the FREC site on September 8th for local winemakers and met with a local winemaker at the LERGREC site. N. Halbrendt presented five talks to growers, research scientists and chemical company representatives. PARTICIPANTS: Dr. Noemi Halbrendt, Project Associate, and Dr. Henry Ngugi, Assistant Professor both located at the Fruit Research & Extension Center, Biglerville, PA were on-site coordinators of the planting and conducted fungicide trials. Mr. John Griggs, Manager and Mr. Bryan Hed, Research Associate located at the Lake Erie Regional Grape Research & Extension Center were on-site coordinators of the planting and collected data and conducted fungicide trials. Financial support for the trial is provided by the Pennsylvania Wine Marketing and Research Board through a voluntary grower check off program. Mr. Mark Chien, State-wide Extension Educator for Wine Grapes housed in Lancaster county provided technical advice on management of the plantings. Mr. Cain Hickey, currently enrolled in Horticulture in Graduate School at Virginia Tech, worked in the vineyard from January 1 through May 15th. TARGET AUDIENCES: The targeted audience are the commercial wine grape growers in Pennsylvania and the Mid-Atlantic region. Grape production information was presented to them at the Mid-Atlantic Fruit and Vegetable Conference and at two Extension Educational meetings and a tour of the planting in August. Chemical company representatives also learned about the research being conducted on grapes at a planning meeting in New York and a Crop Protection Field Day in Biglerville. Lastly, B. Hed and N. Halbrendt presented a paper at the 85th Cumberland Shenandoah Fruit Workers Conference. PROJECT MODIFICATIONS: Nothing significant to report during this reporting period.

Impacts
Based upon the work conducted at these two plantings commercial wine grape growers will have a better understanding of how wine grapes perform in the state of Pennsylvania. They will know how the cultivars in this trial can be adapted to their growing conditions. The discovery of winter die back of canes of Malbec at the Lake Erie site indicate that this cultivar may not be suitable for colder growing conditions. The Minnesota cultivars, MN 1235, MN1189 and LaCrescent potentially can provide new high quality wine grapes for superior locally produced wines. Several of the cultivars at the Adams county site have never been tested in Pennsylvania and if adaptable can increase the cultivar mix for the state's wine growers. Other work at the Adams county site exploring disease control options is helping the wine growers to produce high quality fruit with a minimal use of fungicides through better timing of applications.

Publications

  • Halbrendt, N. O., J. W. Travis, H. K. Ngugi, J. M. Halbrendt, and B. Jarjour. 2010. Evaluation of fungicide programs for control of downy mildew on wine grapes. PDMR 4:SMF018.
  • Halbrendt, N. O., J. W. Travis, and B. Jarjour. 2010. Evaluation of conventional and experimental fungicide programs for control of powdery mildew on wine grapes. PDMR 4:SMF019.
  • Halbrendt, N. O., J. W. Travis, B. Hed, H. K. Ngugi, J. M. Halbrendt, and B. Jarjour. 2010. Evaluation of conventional and experimental fungicides for management of Botrytis rot on wine grapes. PDMR 4:SMF020.
  • Halbrendt, N. O., J. W. Travis, B. Hed, H. K. Ngugi, J. M. Halbrendt, and B. Jarjour. 2010. Evaluation of organic, alternative, and conventional programs for management of Botrytis rot on wine grapes. PDMR. Report 4:SMF021.
  • Hed, B., J. Travis, and N. Halbrendt. 2010. Effect of cultural and chemical methods on cluster architecture and bunch rot of grapes. Proceedings of Cumberland Shenandoah Fruit Workers Conference 85:159-162.


Progress 10/01/08 to 09/30/09

Outputs
OUTPUTS: Two wine grape plantings were maintained during 2009. One was located at the Fruit Research and Extension Center (FREC) in Biglerville, PA and the other was located at the Lake Erie Regional Grape Research and Extension Center (LERGREC) in North East, PA. The planting at FREC consisted of 20 different cultivars in a randomized complete block with 4 vines per block and 6 replications. The planting at LERGREC was statistically arranged in the same fashion but only had 18 cultivars. Vidal blanc vines surrounded both plantings as guard rows. Compost was mounded around the base of the vines at FREC in late fall to protect the bud union. Vines at both locations were cut back to 2 buds to force good strong growth. This year the vines were trained up to the wires. Two trunks on the vinifera cultivars were established to guard against the possibility of one trunk being injured. Replants from vines that did not survive last summer were planted in early spring at both sites. Survival was good with minimal losses of vines. Vigor rating was made on the vines at LERGREC in late August. Events: R. Crassweller participated in a summer field day for grape growers on Canopy Management and NE-1020 Wine Grape Planting. The field day was held at the LEREGREC on June 10 and was attended by about 35 growers. PARTICIPANTS: R. Crassweller is a principle investigator on this project and is responsible for overseeing the maintenance of the two plantings. J. Travis is a principle investigator and provides recommendations on disease control as well as conducting research trials on cultivar susceptibility to diseases. The project is funded in part by the Pennsylvania Wine Marketing and Research Board under the guidance of the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture as a partner organization.. Collaborators in the past year are M. Chien state Extension Educator for Wine Grapes, J. Griggs, Manager LERGREC, and T. Salada, Manager of FREC. An undergraduate Horticulture major, C. Hickey, worked on helping maintain the vines at LERGREC during the summer. TARGET AUDIENCES: The target audiences are the viticulture science community and the commercial wine grape producers in Pennsylvania, the Mid-Atlantic region and across the U.S. The results will be shared with these audiences at meetings and field days. An annual report is presented to the PA Wine Marketing and Research Board. PROJECT MODIFICATIONS: Nothing significant to report during this reporting period.

Impacts
None yet; plantings are too new. Work continues to progress in developing alternative and more efficacious disease control measures.

Publications

  • Travis, J.W. and B. Hed. 2009. Evaluation of leaf removal, giberellic acid and fungicides for control of Botrytis bunch rot of Chardonnay grapes, 2008. Plant Disease & Management Report 3:SMF032.
  • Travis, J.W. and B. Hed. 2009. Evaluation of fungicides and giberellic acid for management of Botrytis bunch rot of Chardonnay grapes, 2008. Plant Disease & Management Report 3:SMF033.
  • Travis, J.W. and B. Hed. 2009. Evaluation of fungicides and giberellic acid for management of Botrytis bunch rot of Vignoles grapes, 2008. Plant Disease & Management Report 3:SMF034.
  • Travis, J.W., N.O. Halbrendt, B. Hed, and B. Jarjour. 2009. Evaluation or organic, conventional fungicides, a giberellic acid programs for management of Botrytis rot on wine grapes, 2008. Plant Disease & Management Report 3:SMF025.
  • Travis, J.W., N.O. Halbrendt, and B. Jarjour. 2009. Botrytis bunch rot control with DPX-LEM 17 on grapes, 2008. Plant Disease & Management Report 3:SMF026.
  • Travis, J.W., N.O. Halbrendt, and B. Jarjour. 2009. Evaluation of synthetic and organic/alternative fungicides for control of powdery mildew on grapes, 2008. Plant Disease & Management Report 3:SMF027.
  • Travis, J.W., N.O. Halbrendt, and B. Jarjour. 2009. Evaluation of fungicide programs for control of downy mildew on Chancellor wine grapes, 2008. Plant Disease & Management Report 3:SMF028.
  • Travis, J.W. and B. Hed. 2009. Evaluation of spray programs and timing for control of ripe and sour rot of wine grapes, 2008. Plant Disease & Management Report 3:SMF029.
  • Travis, J.W. and B. Hed. 2009. Evaluation of alternative fungicides for control of black rot, powdery mildew, and downy mildew of grapes, 2008. Plant Disease & Management Report 3:SMF031.


Progress 10/01/07 to 09/30/08

Outputs
OUTPUTS: Two wine grape plantings were established in spring of 2008. One was located at the Fruit Research and Extension Center (FREC) in Biglerville, PA and the other was located at the Lake Erie Regional Grape Research and Extension Center (LERGREC) in North East, PA. The planting at FREC consisted of 20 different cultivars in a randomized complete block with 4 vines per block and 6 replications. The planting at LERGREC was statistically arranged in the same fashion but only had 18 cultivars. Vidal blanc vines surrounded both plantings as guard rows. The trellis support system was erected at both plantings during the summer and the vines were trained as a single trunk to the first wire. Survival was good with minimal losses of vines. These vines will be replaced this coming spring. Events: R. Crassweller participated in a summer field day at FREC for grape growers on sprayer deposition on June 25. Participated in summer field day with Dr. Richard Smart on August 12 at a vineyard in Lancaster county. PARTICIPANTS: R. Crassweller is a principle investigator on this project and is responsible for overseeing the maintenance of the two plantings. J. Travis is a principle investigator and provides recommendations on disease control as well as conducting research trials on cultivar susceptibility to diseases. The project is funded in part by the Pennsylvania Wine Marketing and Research Board under the guidance of the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture as a partner organization.. Collaborators in the past year are M. Chien state Extension Educator for Wine Grapes, J. Griggs, Manager LERGREC,and T. Salada, Manager of FREC. An undergraduate Horticulture major, C. Hickey, worked on helping maintain the vines at LERGREC during the summer. TARGET AUDIENCES: The target audiences are the viticulture science community and the commercial wine grape producers in Pennsylvania, the Mid-Atlantic region and across the U.S. The results will be shared with these audiences at meetings and field days. An annual report is presented to the PA Wine Marketing and Research Board. PROJECT MODIFICATIONS: Nothing significant to report during this reporting period.

Impacts
None yet - plantings are too new.

Publications

  • Travis, J. W., N. O. Halbrendt, B. Lehman, and B. Jarjour. 2008. Evaluation of materials for the control of grape cluster rots, 2007. Plant Disease Management Report. Vol. 2: STF023.
  • Travis, J. W., N. O. Halbrendt, B. Lehman, and B. Jarjour. 2008. Evaluation of fungicides and spray timing for the control of ripe rot of grapes, 2007. Plant Disease Management Report. Vol. 2: STF026.
  • Travis, J. W., N. O. Halbrendt, B. Lehman, and B. Jarjour. 2008. Evaluation of materials for management of powdery mildew in grapes, 2007. Plant Disease Management Report. Vol. 2: STF025.
  • Travis, J. W., N. O. Halbrendt,B. Lehman, and B. Jarjour. 2008. Effect of canopy separation and leaf removal timing on Botrytis bunch rot, 2007. Plant Disease Management Report. Vol. 2: STF024.
  • Travis, J. W. and B. Hed. 2008. Evaluation of fungicides and gibberellic acid for management of Botrytis rot of grapes, 2007. Plant Disease Management Report. Vol. 2: STF007.
  • Travis, J. W. and B. Hed. 2008. Evaluation of leaf removal, gibberellic acid and fungicides for management of Botrytis bunch rot of grapes, 2007. Plant Disease Management Report. Vol. 2: STF006.
  • Travis, J. W. and B. Hed. 2008. Evaluation of alternative and organic fungicides for control of black rot of Niagara grapes, 2007. Plant Disease Management Report. Vol. 2: STF005.
  • Travis, J. W. and B. Hed. 2008. Evaluation of organic fungicides for control of black rot and powdery mildew of Concord grapes, 2007. Plant Disease Management Report. Vol. 2: STF004.


Progress 01/01/07 to 12/31/07

Outputs
OUTPUTS: R. Crassweller attended and participated in a New Grape Grower's educational event on March 21, 2007. Plans continued to be developed in anticipation of making two new wine grape plantings. One planting will be located at the Fruit Research and Extension Center in Biglerville, Pa. Cultivars in this planting will be predominantly V. vinifera types. The second planting will be located at the Lake Erie Regional Research and Extension Center in North East, PA along the shores of Lake Erie. The cultivars in this planting will be predominantly French hybrid types. Each planting will have 19 cultivars. J. Travis studies the effects of 4 conventional control and one organic control method in a block of 4 cultivars of Vitis interspecific hybrid grapes. J. Travis established a fungicide trial on 4 cultivars of Vitis vinifera. Using various disease forecasting models, infection periods were monitored and posted on an electronic delivery system at the FREC web page. Several trials were conducted looking at cultural methods to reduce the incidence of Botrytis Bunch/Ripe Rot. These included experimental chemicals, comparison of training systems and canopy management procedures such as shoot thinning, positioning and leaf removal. The experiments were viewed at a Grower Field Day held July 12 at FREC. PARTICIPANTS: Individuals: R. M. Crassweller, Department of Horticulture, project leader; J. W. Travis, Department of Plant Pathology; N.O. Halbrendt, Project Assistant, Department of Plant Pathology; B. Hed, Project Assistant, Department of Plant Pathology; B. L. Lehman, Project Assistant, Department of Plant Pathology; M. Chien, Extension Educator; S. Menke, Extension Educator. Partner Organizations: Pennsylvania Wine Marketing and Research Board and the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture. TARGET AUDIENCES: Target Audiences are primarily commercial wine grape producers in the Mid-Atlantic region as well as potential new wine grape growers in the region. PROJECT MODIFICATIONS: Some wine grape cultivars will not be available for planting this coming season due to the unavailability of certified plant materials. These will, however, be ready for planting in 2009.

Impacts
R. Crassweller attended the annual NE-1020 meeting in Austin, TX November 6-9. At this meeting work was begun to develop precise protocols on how various physiological parameters will be measured in the upcoming 2008 wine grape planting. The procedures will be published in a refereed journal to establish a protocol document that can be referred to by other scientists that will be conducting grape cultivar trials.

Publications

  • Travis, J. W., N. O. Halbrendt, B. Lehman and B. Jarjour. 2007. Effect of cluster location on grape cluster rots in a Scott Henry trellis system. 2006 Plant Disease Management Report. Vol. l SMF:034.
  • Travis, J. W., N. O. Halbrendt, B. Lehman and B. Jarjour. 2007. Evaluation of conventional and alternative materials for control of grape cluster diseases. 2006. Plant Disease Management Report. Vol. l SMF:035.
  • Travis, J. W., N. O. Halbrendt, B. Lehman and B. Jarjour. 2007. Evaluation of fungicide application timing and cultivar susceptibility for control of ripe rot of grapes. 2006. Plant Disease Management Report. SMF:036.
  • Hed, B. and J.W. Travis. 2007. Evaluation of organic fungicides for control of black rot and powdery mildew of Concord grapes, 2006. Plant Disease Management Reports Vol 1:SMF:007.
  • Hed, B. and J.W. Travis. 2007. Evaluation of alternative and organic fungicides for control of Niagara grape diseases, 2006. Plant Disease Management Reports Vol 1:SMF:008.
  • Hed, B. and J.W. Travis. 2007. Evaluation of oil, lime sulfur, and cultural control for management of Botrytis bunch rot of Chardonnay grapes, 2006. Plant Disease Management Reports Vol 1:SMF:009.


Progress 01/01/06 to 12/31/06

Outputs
This project is a national project which is focusing on the evaluation of wine grape cultivars. The project will determine which of the standard cultivars and regional cultivar selections are best suited for the growing conditions and climate of the area. Standard trellis systems, cultural practices and pest management will be implemented across all of the vineyard sites. The specific vineyard sites that will be planted in PA have been identified and initial preparations have begun for vine establishment in 2008. The vineyards will be located in the Lake Erie Grape Research and Extension Center in Erie County and the Fruit Research and Extension Center in Adams County. PA wine grape growers have held sessions during 2006 on several occasions to discuss and determine the wine grape cultivars of most interest for the state. Specific cold climate cultivars have been selected for the Erie County location with warm climate cultivars planned for the Adams County vineyard which is located in south central Pennsylvania. Cover crops are planned for planting in 2007 to inhibit nematodes and improve soil microbial diversity and improve planting conditions.

Impacts
This project will identify the cultivars that are best suited for wine grape production in both the northwest and the southern regions of PA. Additionally, cultural practices that enhance the yield and wine grape juice quality for the cultivars will be determined. Upon completion of this project, Pennsylvania wine grape growers will have the opportunity to select the most suitable wine grape cultivars for their region and growing conditions.

Publications

  • No publications reported this period


Progress 01/01/05 to 12/31/05

Outputs
Two meetings were held to review the project objectives and coordinate plans for winegrape cultivar and clone evaluation among the cooperating states. Project objectives were reviewed with evaluation design and timeline approved for implementation. Trial locations are identified as warm, cool, cold and very cold with cultivar selection reflecting the climate of the region. In addition, cultivars are being identified as long or short season. It was agreed that 8 common cultivars will be evaluated across all trial locations for comparison. The common cultivars are Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, Pinot Noir, Chambourcin, Vidal, St. Croix and Frontenac. Additionally, each state was asked to work with grower industry groups and university research and extension personnel to identify other cultivars that are of interest for testing for the region. PA growers, winemakers and university personnel developed a list of an additional 30 cultivars identified for testing. Each cultivar will be tested in 4-vine plots replicated 6 times resulting in a trial block of about 1.5 acres. Planting will occur in 2007. The Lake Erie Grape Research and Extension Center in Erie County and the Fruit Research and Extension Center in Adams County have been identified as the two trial locations for PA. A proposal has been developed for submission to the Viticultural Consortium:East to fund plant material. Future proposals to VC:East will request funding for vineyard establishment and operation costs. It is expected that local and state funding will supplement project financial requirements. Cooperators will be responsible to follow NE-1020 protocols in project design and data collection.

Impacts
This project has 1.) brought grape researchers, extension personnel and industry representatives from across the country together to discuss and plan for the future of the winegrape industry in the United States and 2.) fostered discussion between grape growers, winemakers and university personnel on the available winegrape cultivars and clones resulting in agreement on the cultivars with the most potential for the region.

Publications

  • No publications reported this period