Source: TEXAS COOPERATIVE EXTENSION submitted to
THE SOUTHERN REGION WATER QUALITY COORDINATION PROJECT
Sponsoring Institution
National Institute of Food and Agriculture
Project Status
TERMINATED
Funding Source
Reporting Frequency
Annual
Accession No.
0201560
Grant No.
2004-51130-03114
Project No.
TEXN0X011
Proposal No.
2007-04730
Multistate No.
(N/A)
Program Code
110.B
Project Start Date
Sep 15, 2004
Project End Date
Sep 14, 2009
Grant Year
2006
Project Director
McFarland, M. L.
Recipient Organization
TEXAS COOPERATIVE EXTENSION
(N/A)
COLLEGE STATION,TX 77843
Performing Department
Texas AgriLife Extension Service
Non Technical Summary
The Project is a collaborative effort among the 13 states in EPA Regions IV and VI to develop, deliver and sustain implementation of new and existing technologies to protect and enhance water resources throughout the Southern Region and the United States. Coordinating, collaborating and integrating efforts will reduce costs and improve effectiveness of each state's water quality program.
Animal Health Component
75%
Research Effort Categories
Basic
25%
Applied
75%
Developmental
(N/A)
Classification

Knowledge Area (KA)Subject of Investigation (SOI)Field of Science (FOS)Percent
11203992050100%
Goals / Objectives
The primary objectives of the project are to: 1) Support ongoing efforts of the regional coordinating committee to facilitate program planning and communication, define and prioritize research and educational needs, identify expertise of contributing institutions, facilitate resource sharing and technology transfer among institutions and with other federal and state agencies, organizations and stakeholders, and support the CSREES National Integrated Water Quality Program, 2) Develop and apply the best available science in water quality management through establishment and facilitation of Regional Program Teams under three Focus Areas. Focus Areas will coordinate the work of 12 Program Teams to integrate research, education, and extension, sharing information and resources, minimizing duplication of effort, establishing partnerships, and leveraging multiple funding sources to address critical water quality issues, and 3) Maintain and expand the watershed-based, geo-referenced, central database management system to serve as the repository for regional water quality information and resources, provide direct linkages to other regional and national database systems, and conduct coordinated needs and impact assessments regarding regional issues and programs.
Project Methods
The project utilizes an interdisciplinary, multi-state approach to develop and deliver watershed-based water quality and quantity research and education programs. The Southern Region Water Quality Planning Committee (SRWQPC) is composed of Water Quality Coordinators from 1862 and 1890 land grant institutions responsible for state-wide implementation of water quality research, education and extension programs. The SRWQPC serves as the Regional Coordinating Committee for the project and provides centralized coordination and networking both internally and with other regional water resources management programs, promotes technology development and exchange, and fosters collaborative, multi-state and multi-disciplinary efforts to more effectively and efficiently address common issues and concerns. Regional coordination through the SRWQPC promotes the development and delivery of effective management systems that can be adapted for widespread application throughout the region and the nation. Primary emphasis is placed on providing leadership for water resources research, education and outreach to help people, industry and governments prevent and solve current and emerging water quality and quantity problems. The project targets three key Focus Areas: Agricultural Pollution Prevention, Rural Environmental Protection and Watershed Management. Within each Focus Area, four priority Programs represent the SRWQPC assessment of needs for agricultural and rural communities. Multi-state, multi-disciplinary Program Teams conduct regional level strategic planning with partner agencies and stakeholders to identify needs, accumulate research, education and outreach resources, and facilitate the implementation of coordinated regional and multi-state programs. To facilitate the accumulation, organization and delivery of resources and information, a web-based interface has been developed at Texas A&M University (http://srwqis.tamu.edu). This interface provides a direct link to other pertinent GIS/geo-referenced information systems across the region, links and communicates with water quality programs at the watershed and regional levels, and promotes regional and national awareness and coordination in the development and delivery of water resource management programs. Specific emphasis is placed on creating and expanding linkages within and among land grant university research, education and extension programs and external partners throughout the region.

Progress 09/15/04 to 09/14/09

Outputs
OUTPUTS: The Southern Region Water Quality Planning Committee (SRWQPC) composed of Water Quality Coordinators from the 13 states participating in the project continued to develop and deliver technology and resources to agricultural producers and rural communities across the South to enable them to better understand and respond to critical water resource issues. The project utilizes an interdisciplinary, multi-state approach to develop and deliver watershed-based water quality and quantity research and education programs. Seven Regional Program Areas were targeted: (1) Nutrient Management, (2) Animal Waste Management, (3) Irrigation Water Management, (4) Drinking Water and Rural/Urban Interface Education, (5) Water Policy and Economics, (6) Watershed Assessment and Modeling, and (7) Watershed Education and Restoration. These Regional Program Areas encompass the eight national water resource themes, and represent key areas of need for agricultural and rural communities in the South. Program teams are composed of extension and research/teaching personnel from 1862 and 1890 institutions in states targeting that issue with integrated efforts in extension, research, and education. The SRWQPC met face-to-face in February in Sparks, NV and twice via Centra web conferences in July to discuss program planning and project implementation. New resources developed through the Project during the reporting period include: 21 refereed journal articles; 82 fact sheets; 48 proceedings and abstracts; 7 training manuals; and 78 popular articles, radio, TV and news releases. More than 42 research/demonstration projects were implemented to evaluate and promote the use of science-based best management practices for water resource protection and enhancement. The Project continued to be heavily involved in implementing the primary goal of the Committee for Shared Leadership (CSL), which is to foster a national program in concert with CSREES by linking the 406 regional projects and their network of research, education and extension professionals. In addition, the Project assisted the CSL by organizing the National Water Conference, and updating and providing national resources including: web-based Drinking Water & Human Health (DWHH) FAQ database (averaging about 4,215 hits/day), National Water Program Outcome Report, National Water Quality Coordinators Directory, and CSREES National Water Quality Program poster. The Project supported eXtension through leadership of a new DWHH CoP. The Project enhanced collaboration with 1890 institutions through follow-up activities to the Water Quality Collaborative Conference for 1890-1862-1994 Institutions and through expanded participation on the Program Teams. The regional database at http://srwqis.tamu.edu is visited approximately 4,000 times per month. PARTICIPANTS: Dr. Jimmy A. Bonner, Mississippi State University serves as a member of the SRWQPC and, as and participates in all planning efforts and meetings associated with the project. Dr. Mike Daniels, University of Arkansas serves as a member of the SRWQPC and, as and participates in all planning efforts and meetings associated with the project. Dr. Cassel Gardner, Florida A&M University serves as a member of the SRWQPC; is the 1890 Institution representative to the Committee for Shared Leadership for Water Quality (CSL-WQ); and participates in all planning meetings associated with the project. Dr. James E. Hairston, Auburn University serves as a member of the SRWQPC; Program Leader for Drinking Water and Human Health, and participates in all planning efforts and meetings associated with the project. Dr. John C. Hayes, Clemson University serves as a member of the SRWQPC; and participates in all planning efforts and meetings associated with the project. Dr. Greg Jennings, North Carolina State University serves as a member of the SRWQPC, as Regional Coordinator for Region IV, and as a member of the CSL-WQ; serves as a PD for the Regional Project, as Program Leader for Watershed Education and Restoration. Dr. Jennings participates in all planning efforts and meetings associated with the project. Dr. Brian LeBlanc, Louisiana State University serves as a member of the SRWQPC and participates in all planning efforts and meetings associated with the project. Dr. Mark L. McFarland, Texas A&M University serves as a member of the SRWQPC, as Regional Coordinator for Region VI, and as a member of the CSL-WQ; and serves as PD for the Regional Project, as Program Leader for Nutrient Management. Dr. McFarland participates in all planning efforts and meetings associated with the project. Dr. Tom Obreza, University of Florida serves as a member of the SRWQPC and co-leader for Irrigation Water Management and participates in all planning efforts and meetings associated with the project. Dr. L. Mark Risse, University of Georgia serves as a member of the SRWQPC; serves as a Program Leader for Animal Waste Management participates in all planning efforts and meetings associated with the project. Mr. R. Craig Runyan, New Mexico State University serves as a member of the SRWQPC and as Program Co-Leader for Irrigation Water Management, and participates in all planning efforts and meetings associated with the project. Dr. George F. Smith, University of Tennessee serves as a member of the SRWQPC and participates in all planning efforts and meetings associated with the project. Dr. Michael D. Smolen, Oklahoma State University serves as a member of the SRWQPC, and, as PD for the regional project, as Co-Leader for Water Policy and Economics, and participates in all planning efforts and meetings associated with the project. Dr. Raghavan Srinivasan, Texas A&M University administers all activities associated with the regional water quality database and participates in planning efforts and meetings associated with the project. TARGET AUDIENCES: The target audience of this regional coordination project includes all watershed stakeholders in the southern region of the U.S. including students K-graduate/professional school; residents, homeowners, landowners and managers; city and county agencies; local, state and federal natural resource and regulatory agencies; and citizen groups including non-governmental organizations. PROJECT MODIFICATIONS: Nothing significant to report during this reporting period.

Impacts
The Southern Region Water Quality Coordination Project promoted regional collaboration, enhanced delivery of successful programs and encouraged multi-state efforts to protect and restore water resources. Effective approaches for watershed management, pollution prevention and youth education have been identified and shared among states. The project has improved public access to research, extension and education resources available through the Land Grant University System in the Southern Region and nationwide. The NM program team continued to synthesize multi-state information and research by developing the following white papers and websites (http://srwqis.tamu.edu): 1) Soil Test Calibration Work in the Southern USA summarizes resources directed to soil test calibration across the South and makes recommendations for conducting and coordinating new calibration studies, 2) Public Agricultural Services/Soil Testing Laboratories: Their value and contributions in the Land Grant, and 3) Regional soil test web page that links producers with soil test laboratories in their area and includes a streaming video demonstration of proper collection of soil samples. Regional poultry litter programs were delivered by the AWM team to producers, county agents, and private consultants. The IWM team developed Water Ripples, an interactive youth education game. The WER team developed a new comprehensive training resource called Watershed Stewards which has been delivered to over 1000 citizens and is being adopted by other regions. Results from pre/post-test evaluations indicate that knowledge of pollutant sources/BMPs and watershed function increased by 58% and 35%, and 80% of attendees have adopted and/or maintained water quality BMPs on their property. A computer-based adaptation of the training is under development. Additionally, the WER program team delivered 6 Extension agent training programs titled: Extension's Role in Developing Watersheds which provided hands-on experience in land use, watershed planning, and watershed restoration. Pre/post-workshop surveys indicated statistically significant knowledge gain occurred in all workshop topics. The WER team also organized the Southeast Regional Stream Restoration Conference (November 2008, Asheville, NC) which was attended by 485 professionals from 22 states and targeted ecosystem restoration design, implementation, and management. WER also delivered professional development workshops on stream restoration to 400 professionals in 6 states and implemented 6 new restoration projects to demonstrate and evaluate innovative restoration techniques: (1) coal mine reclamation, KY; (2) urban parks, AL; (3) mountain forest, NC; and (4) urban floodplains, NC. A six-month follow up survey of water resource professionals trained at the regional water conference in Fayetteville, AR in October 2007 indicated that 90% had enhanced their ability to plan, conduct and evaluate programs. In addition, resulting collaborations and technology transfer have saved thousands of hours of professional time by minimizing duplicative efforts in program and resource development. Twenty states and the District of Columbia participated.

Publications

  • No publications reported this period


Progress 10/01/07 to 09/30/08

Outputs
OUTPUTS: The Southern Region Water Quality Planning Committee (SRWQPC) composed of Water Quality Coordinators from the 13 states participating in the project continued to develop and deliver technology and resources to agricultural producers and rural communities across the South to enable them to better understand and respond to critical water resource issues. The project utilizes an interdisciplinary, multi-state approach to develop and deliver watershed-based water quality and quantity research and education programs. Seven Regional Program Areas were targeted: (1) Nutrient Management, (2) Animal Waste Management, (3) Irrigation Water Management, (4) Drinking Water and Rural/Urban Interface Education, (5) Water Policy and Economics, (6) Watershed Assessment and Modeling, and (7) Watershed Education and Restoration. These Regional Program Areas encompass the eight national water resource themes, and represent key areas of need for agricultural and rural communities in the South. Program teams are composed of extension and research/teaching personnel from 1862 and 1890 institutions in states targeting that issue with integrated efforts in extension, research, and education. The SRWQPC met face-to-face in February in Sparks, NV and twice via Centra web conferences in July to discuss program planning and project implementation. New resources developed through the Project during the reporting period include: 21 refereed journal articles; 82 fact sheets; 48 proceedings and abstracts; 7 training manuals; and 78 popular articles, radio, TV and news releases. More than 42 research/demonstration projects were implemented to evaluate and promote the use of science-based best management practices for water resource protection and enhancement. The Project continued to be heavily involved in implementing the primary goal of the Committee for Shared Leadership (CSL), which is to foster a national program in concert with CSREES by linking the 406 regional projects and their network of research, education and extension professionals. In addition, the Project assisted the CSL by organizing the National Water Conference, and updating and providing national resources including: web-based Drinking Water & Human Health (DWHH) FAQ database (averaging about 4,215 hits/day), National Water Program Outcome Report, National Water Quality Coordinators Directory, and CSREES National Water Quality Program poster. The Project supported eXtension through leadership of a new DWHH CoP. The Project enhanced collaboration with 1890 institutions through follow-up activities to the Water Quality Collaborative Conference for 1890-1862-1994 Institutions and through expanded participation on the Program Teams. The regional database at http://srwqis.tamu.edu/ is visited approximately 4,000 times per month. PARTICIPANTS: Dr. Jimmy A. Bonner, Mississippi State University serves as a member of the SRWQPC and, as and participates in all planning efforts and meetings associated with the project. Dr. Mike Daniels, University of Arkansas serves as a member of the SRWQPC and, as and participates in all planning efforts and meetings associated with the project. Dr. Cassel Gardner, Florida A&M University serves as a member of the SRWQPC; is the 1890 Institution representative to the Committee for Shared Leadership for Water Quality (CSL-WQ); and participates in all planning meetings associated with the project. Dr. James E. Hairston, Auburn University serves as a member of the SRWQPC; Program Leader for Drinking Water and Human Health, and participates in all planning efforts and meetings associated with the project. Dr. John C. Hayes, Clemson University serves as a member of the SRWQPC; and participates in all planning efforts and meetings associated with the project. Dr. Greg Jennings, North Carolina State University serves as a member of the SRWQPC, as Regional Coordinator for Region IV, and as a member of the CSL-WQ; serves as a PD for the Regional Project, as Program Leader for Watershed Education and Restoration. Dr. Jennings participates in all planning efforts and meetings associated with the project. Dr. Brian LeBlanc, Louisiana State University serves as a member of the SRWQPC and participates in all planning efforts and meetings associated with the project. Dr. Mark L. McFarland, Texas A&M University serves as a member of the SRWQPC, as Regional Coordinator for Region VI, and as a member of the CSL-WQ; and serves as PD for the Regional Project, as Program Leader for Nutrient Management. Dr. McFarland participates in all planning efforts and meetings associated with the project. Dr. Tom Obreza, University of Florida serves as a member of the SRWQPC and co-leader for Irrigation Water Management and participates in all planning efforts and meetings associated with the project. Dr. L. Mark Risse, University of Georgia serves as a member of the SRWQPC; serves as a Program Leader for Animal Waste Management participates in all planning efforts and meetings associated with the project. Mr. R. Craig Runyan, New Mexico State University serves as a member of the SRWQPC and as Program Co-Leader for Irrigation Water Management, and participates in all planning efforts and meetings associated with the project. Dr. George F. Smith, University of Tennessee serves as a member of the SRWQPC and participates in all planning efforts and meetings associated with the project. Dr. Michael D. Smolen, Oklahoma State University serves as a member of the SRWQPC, and, as PD for the regional project, as Co-Leader for Water Policy and Economics, and participates in all planning efforts and meetings associated with the project. Dr. Raghavan Srinivasan, Texas A&M University administers all activities associated with the regional water quality database and participates in planning efforts and meetings associated with the project. TARGET AUDIENCES: The target audience of this regional coordination project includes all watershed stakeholders in the southern region of the U.S. including students K-graduate/professional school; residents, homeowners, landowners and managers; city and county agencies; local, state and federal natural resource and regulatory agencies; and citizen groups including non-governmental organizations. PROJECT MODIFICATIONS: Nothing significant to report during this reporting period.

Impacts
The Southern Region Water Quality Regional Coordination Project (SRWQPC) promoted regional collaboration, enhanced delivery of successful programs and encouraged multi-state efforts to protect and restore water resources. The Nutrient Management program team continued to synthesize multi-state information and research by developing the following three white papers and websites: 1) Soil Test Calibration Work in the Southern USA summarizes resources directed to soil test calibration across the South and makes recommendations for conducting and coordinating new calibration studies, 2) Public Agricultural Services/Soil Testing Laboratories: Their value and contributions in the Land Grant University underscores the increasing importance of soil tests in reducing nutrient losses to water resources and saving money for producers, and 3) Soil test web pages facilitate producers linking to soil test laboratories in their areas and stream video demonstration of proper collection of soil samples. Regional poultry litter trading and utilization programs, as well as a regional poultry litter forum focusing on opportunities for outcomes, were delivered by the Animal Waste Management program team to producers, county agents, and private consultants. The regional Irrigation and Water Management program team is completing its Youth Education special project. The team is providing copies of the Water Ripples board game to all 1440 Southern Region counties. Results from pre-and post-test evaluations of the Watershed Education and Restoration program team Watershed Steward Program indicate that knowledge regarding pollutant sources/BMPs and watershed function increased by 58% and 35%. Results from 6-month delayed post-test evaluations indicate that 80% of workshop attendees more closely monitor individual actions that could impair water quality, 80% have adopted and/or maintained water quality BMPs on their property, and 65% have encouraged others in their community to attend a Watershed Steward workshop. Additionally, the team delivered curriculum titled: Agent Training: Extension's Role in Developing Watersheds. Pre/post-workshop knowledge and behavior intention changes were measured through surveys: statistically significant knowledge gain occurred in all workshop topics, and participants indicated a significant intent to change behavior as a result of the workshop. The Watershed Education and Restoration program team also organized the Southeast Regional Stream Restoration Conference. 485 professionals from 22 states gained knowledge and networking contacts to improve ecosystem restoration design, implementation, and management. The program team also provided professional development workshops for 400 professionals in 6 states. A six-month follow up survey of the regional water conference in Fayetteville, AR in October, 2007 indicated that 90% of participants had learned something they were able to use in their work. Respondents estimated that attending the conference increased their grant awards received by more than $400,000. In addition, resulting collaborations and technology transfer have saved thousands of hours of professional time.

Publications

  • Sharpley, A.N., Kleinman, P.J.A., Heathwaite, A.L., Gburek, W.L., Folmar, G.L., and Schmidt, J.P. Phosphorus loss from an agricultural watershed as a function of storm size. J. Environ. Qual. 37:362-368. 2008. Sharpley, A.N., Kleinman, P.J.A., Heathwaite, A.L., Gburek, W.L., Weld, J.L. and Folmar, G.L. Integrating contributing areas and indexing phosphorus loss from agricultural watersheds. J. Environ. Qual. 37:1488-1496. 2008.
  • Shigaki, F., Kleinman, P.J.A., Schmidt, J.P., Sharpley, A.N., and Allen, A.L. Impact of dredging on phosphorus transport in agricultural drainage ditches of the Atlantic Coastal Plain. J. Am. Water Resour. Assoc. 44(6):1500-1511. 2008.
  • Sikora, F.J., H. Bryant, P.S. Howe, R. Henderson, W. Johnson, D. Kissel, M. Mozaffari, R.S. Mylavarapu and H. Zhang. 2008. Phosphorus in Mehlich-1 and Mehlich-3 Soil Tests: An Inter-laboratory Evaluation of ICP vs. Colorimetric Analysis. Southern Regional Fact Sheet, SERA-IEG-6. pp16.
  • Simpson, T.W., Sharpley, A.N., Howarth, R.W., Paerl, H.W., and Mankin, K.R. The new gold rush: Fueling ethanol production while protecting water quality. J. Environ. Qual. 37:318-324. 2008.
  • Singh, K., L.M. Risse, K.C. Das and J. Worley, 2008. Effect of Fractionation on Fuel Properties of Poultry Litter. Applied Engineering in Agriculture 24(3):1-5.
  • Singh, K., L.M. Risse, and J. Worley, 2007. Sludge Measurement Using Global Positioning System (GPS) Enabled Sonar Equipped Airboat in a Lagoon. Applied Engineering in Agriculture 24(5):603-609.
  • Smith, T.A., D.L. Osmond, C.E. Moorman, J.M. Stucky, and J. Wendell Gilliam. 2008. Effect of Vegetation Management on Bird Habitat in Riparian Buffer Zones. Southeastern Naturalist 7:277-288.
  • Sonon, L. and J. Gaskin. 2008. Metal concentration standards for land application of biosolids and other by-products in Georgia. UGA Extension Bulletin No.1353.
  • Tullos, D.D., and G.D. Jennings. 2008. Dam Removal. In: S. W. Trimble, B. A. Stewart, and T. A. Howell (Eds.) Encyclopedia of WaterScience, Second Edition. Taylor & Francis Group, Boca Raton, FL. pp. 138-142.
  • Tullos, D.D., D.L. Penrose, G.D. Jennings, and W.G. Cope. 2009. Analysis of functional traits in reconfigured channels: implications for the bioassessment and disturbance of river restoration. J. N. Am. Benthol. Soc. 28(1):80-92.
  • Hazel, D.W., E.C. Franklin, K.T. Thomas, and G.D. Jennings. 2008. Integrated practices for reducing sediment loss from Piedmont tobacco fields. J. Soil & Water Cons. 63(3):143-152.
  • Higgins, S.F., Agouridis, C.T., and Gumbert, A.A. 2008 Drinking Water Quality Guidelines for for Cattle. University of Kentucky, College of Agriculture ID-170.
  • Higgins, S.F., Guinn, S. and Gumbert, A.A. 2008. On-Farm Composting of Animal Mortalities. University of Kentucky, College of Agriculture ID-166.
  • Higgins, S.F., Guinn, S. and Gumbert, A.A. 2008. On-Farm Disposal of Animal Mortalities. University of Kentucky, College of Agriculture ID-167.
  • Kang, J., D.L. Hestergerg, and D.L. Osmond. 2008. Soil Organic Matter Effects on Phosphorus Sorption: A Path Analysis. Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J. (accepted)
  • Kissel, D.E., L.M. Risse, L. Sonon, and G. Harris. 2008. Calculating the Fertilizer Value of Broiler Litter, UGA Extension Bulletin C 933 November 2008. http://pubs.caes.uga.edu/caespubs/pubcd/C933/C933.htm
  • Koelsch, R., J.Heemstra, J. Harrison, and M. Risse, 2008. eXtension. Launch of Livestock and Poultry Environmantal Learning Center. Proceedings of the 2008 CSREES National Water Conference held in Sparks, NV. http://www.usawaterquality.org/conferences/2008/Koelsch08.html
  • Lemon, R.L., M.L. McFarland, R. Boman, F.M. Hons, B. Bean, T. Provin. 2008. Nitrogen Management in Cotton. SCS-2008-01.
  • Line, D. E., G. D. Jennings, M. B. Shaffer, J. Calabria, W. F. Hunt. 2008. Evaluating the effectiveness of two stormwater wetlands in North Carolina. Trans. Am. Soc. Agric. Bio. Eng. 51(2):521-528.
  • McDowell, R.W., Sharpley, A.N., and Bourke, W. Treatment of drainage water with industrial by-products to prevent phosphorus loss from tile-drained land. J. Environ. Qual. 37:1575-1582. 2008.
  • Mukundan, R., D.E. Radcliffe, L.M. Risse, W.P. Miller, and J.C. Ritchie. 2008. Sediment Fingerprinting in a Southern Piedmont Watershed - Preliminary Results. Proceedings of the 2008 CSREES National Water Conference held in Sparks, NV. http://www.usawaterquality.org/conferences/2008/abstracts/Mukundan08. pdf
  • Munoz-Arboleda, F., R.S. Mylavarapu, C.M. Hutchinson, and K.M. Portier. 2008. Nitrate-N Concentrations in the Perched Ground Water under Seepage-Irrigated Potato Cropping Systems. J. Environ. Quality. 37:387-394.
  • Mylavarapu, R. 2008. Impact of Phosphorus on Water Quality. SL 275, Soil & Water Science, Cooperative Extension Service, IFAS. p4.
  • Mylavarapu, R., K. Hines, and A. Dodd. 2008. Cost Share Programs for Florida Agricultural Producers and Landowners. SL 264, Soil & Water Science, Cooperative Extension Service, IFAS. p4.
  • Mylavarapu, R., K. Hines, and T. Obreza. 2008. Diagnostic Nutrient Testing for Commercial Citrus in Florida. SL 279, Soil & Water Science, Cooperative Extension Service, IFAS. p6.
  • Risse, L.M., 2008. What is needed to improve BMPs: A Case Study from Georgia. Proceedings of StormCon 2008 North American Surface Water Quality Conference and Exposition held August 3-7, 2008, Orlando, Florida www.StormCon.com
  • Risse, L.M., T.M. Bass, and R. Sheffield, 2008. Land Application Procedures and Equipment. Ag Nutrient Management 4(2):20-25. http://www.progressivedairy.com/anm/features/2008/0208/0208_risse.htm l
  • Risse, L.M., M. Bowie, and R. Seymour, 2008. WaterSmart: Georgias Water Conservation Program. Proceedings of the 2008 CSREES National Water Conference held in Sparks, NV. http://www.usawaterquality.org/conferences/2008/abstracts/Risse08.pdf
  • Risse, L.M., K.L. Rowles, J.D. Mullen, S.E. Collier, D.E. Kissel, M.L. Wilson, and F.Chen. 2008. Protecting Water Quality with Incentives for Litter Transfer in Georgia. Final report submitted to Georgia Soil and Water Conservation Commission. www.agp2.org/aware
  • Risse, L.M., S. Thompson, J. Governo, and K. Harris. 2008. Evaluation of SiltSaver BSRF. Journal of Soil and Water Conservation 63(5):265-273.
  • Robertson, G. P., Dale, V. H., Doering, C.D., Hamburg, S. P., Melillo, J. M., Wander, M. M., Parton, W. J., Adler, P. R., Barney, J., Cruse, R. M., Duke, C. S., Fearnside, P. M., Follett, R. F., Gibbs, H. K., Goldemberg, J., Mladenoff, D. J., Ojima, D., Palmer, M. W., Sharpley, A. N., Sharpley, A.N., Richards, P.R., and Herron, S. Can Production and Environmental Goals Coexist in Phosphorus-Based Farm Management p. 15-24. In G. H. Rubek (ed.), Nordic Association of Agricultural Scientists Conference, Phosphorus Management in Nordic-Baltic Agriculture - Reconciling Productivity and Environmental Protection, Brunnspaviljongen, Eklundshof, Uppsala, Sweden. September, 2008.
  • Romies, J.J., C.R. Jackson, D.E. Radcliffe, L.M. Risse, and J. Bryant, 2008. Estimating phosphorus loads in streams draining poultry-pasture operations in the upper Etowah River basin, Georgia. Proceedings of the 2008 CSREES National Water Conference held in Sparks, NV. http://www.usawaterquality.org/conferences/2008/abstracts/Romeis08.pd f
  • Rowles, K., L.M. Risse, J. Mullen, and S Collier, 2008. Protecting Water Quality with Incentives for Litter Transfer in Georgia: Learning From Experience. Proceedings of the 2008 CSREES National Water Conference held in Sparks, NV. http://www.usawaterquality.org/conferences/2008/abstracts/Rowles08.pd f
  • Seymour, R.M., G.L. Wade, and L.M. Risse. 2008. Developing a WaterSmart Landscape. UGA Extension Circular 930. http://pubs.caes.uga.edu/caespubs/pubs/PDF/C930.pdf
  • Shaffer, K., Osmond, D.L., S. Shah. 2008. SoilFacts: Phosphorus Management for Land Application of Biosolids and Animal Waste. AG439-64.
  • Veith, T.L., Sharpley, A.N., Arnold J.G. Modeling a small, northeastern watershed with detailed, field-level data. Trans. Am. Soc. Agric. Bio. Eng. 51(2):471-483. 2008.
  • Wallace, L. W., Weathers, Sharpley, A. N., and West C. Pressures on beef grazing in mixed production farming. p.187-208. In: R. W. McDowell (ed.), Environmental Impacts of Pasture-based Faming. CABI Publishing, Wallingford, Oxfordshire, United Kingdom. 2008.
  • Withers, P.J.A. and Sharpley, A.N. Characterization and apportionment of nutrient and sediment sources in catchments. J. Hydrol. 350 (3-4):127-130. 2008.
  • Zhu, X., L.M. Risse, and S. McCutheon, 2008. Field investigation of compost blankets for erosion control under concentrated flow conditions. Abstracts of the Southeastern Environmental Flows Conference held October 27-29, 2008. Athens, Georgia.
  • Agouridis, C.T., R.C. Warner, C.D. Barton, D.A. Bidelspach, G.D. Jennings, R. Osborne, and J.W. Marchant. 2008. Recreating a headwater stream system on a head-of-hollow fill. In: Proc. Society of Mining Engineering Conf., February 24-27, 2008, Salt Lake City, UT.
  • Aneja, V.P., J. Blunden, K. James, W.H. Schlesinger, R. Knighton, W. Gilliam, G.D. Jennings, D. Niyogi, and S. Cole. 2008. Ammonia assessment from agriculture: U.S. status and needs. J. Environ Quality 37:515-520.
  • Aneja, V.P., J. Blunden, P. A. Roelle, W.H. Schlesinger, R. Knighton, D. Niyogi, W. Gilliam, G.D. Jennings, and C.S. Duke. 2008. Workshop on agricultural air quality: State of the science. Atmospheric Environment 42(14): 3195-3208.
  • Bean, B. and M.L. McFarland. 2008. Getting the Most out of Your Nitrogen Fertilization in Corn. SCS-2008-03.
  • Boellstorff, D.E. and McFarland, M.L. (eds.). 2008. CSREES National Integrated Water Quality Program Impact Report, 2006-2007. Texas AgriLife Extension Service, College Station, Texas. 28 pp.
  • Boellstorff, D.E. and M.L. McFarland. 2008. Southern Region Water Quality Coordination Project 2008. CSREES National Water Quality Conference. Proceedings posted to http://www.usawaterquality.org/conferences/2007/PPTs&Posters/Poster/B oellstorff_National.pdf for poster and http://www.usawaterquality.org/conferences/2007/2007_Abstracts_PDF/Po sters/Committee%20for%20Shared%20Leadership/Boellstorff.pdf for abstract. Savannah, Georgia.
  • Cahill, S.L., A.M. Johnson, D.L. Osmond and D.H. Hardy. 2008. Response of Starter Fertilizer Phosphorus for Corn and Cotton Production on Soils Testing Very High for Phosphorus. Agron. J. 100:537-542.
  • Dell Olio, L.A., R.O. Maguire, and D.L. Osmond. 2008. Influence of Aluminum on Phosphorus Sorption in Organic Soils. Soil Science. 173(2):119-129.
  • Dennis, S.O., D. Duseja, P. Vendrell and A. Wade. 2008. Monitoring water wells in middle Tennessee with down well camera technology. In: Proceedings of the Journal of Environmental Monitoring and Restoration. Vol 5.
  • Dennis, S.O., J. Oliver, and P. Nveawiah-Yoho. 2008. Monitoring the persistence of chlorpyrifos used in Japanese beetle larvae control in field-grown balled and burlapped nursery stock. In: Proceedings of the Journal of Environmental Monitoring and Restoration. Vol 5.
  • Golson-Garner, K., T. Tsegaye, P. Okweye, W. Tadesse, M. Wagaw. 2008. Occurrence and Distribution of Heavy Metals in Surface Water of the Huntsville Spring Branch Watershed. 99th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Agronomy (ASA-CSSA-SSSA). November 4-8, 2007, New Orleans, LA. In: Am. Soc. of Agronomy, Madison, WI.
  • Hasan, M., T. Tsegaye, F. Shi, G. Schaefer, and G. Taylor. 2008. Model for predicting rainfall by fuzzy set theory using USDA scan data. Journal of Agricultural Water Management 5:1350-1360.
  • Hathaway, A.M., W.F. Hunt, and G.D. Jennings. 2008. A field study of green roof hydrologic and water quality performance. Trans. ASABE 51(1):37-44.
  • Newman, Y.C., C. Mackowiak, R. Mylavarapu, and M. Silveira. 2008. Fertilizing and Liming Forage Crops. SS-AGR-176, Agronomy, Science, Cooperative Extension Service, IFAS. p8.
  • Osmond, D.L. and J. Kang. 2008. Soil Facts: Nutrient Removal by Crops. AGW 439-16W.
  • Pennington, J., Daniels, M., and Sharpley, A.N. 2008. Best management practices for livestock farms. Cooperative Extension Service, Division of Agriculture, University of Arkansas, Little Rock, AR. Fact Sheet FSA. 8 pages.
  • Pennington, J., Daniels, M., and Sharpley, A.N. 2008. Using the watershed approach to maintain and enhance water quality. Cooperative Extension Service, Division of Agriculture, University of Arkansas, Little Rock, AR. Fact Sheet FSA. 8 pages.
  • Provin, T., S. Feagley, J. Pitt, and M. McFarland. 2008. Soil Testing Following Flooding, Overland Flow of Wastewaters and Other Freshwater Related Disasters. SCS-2008-07.


Progress 10/01/06 to 09/30/07

Outputs
OUTPUTS: The Southern Region Water Quality Planning Committee (SRWQPC) composed of Water Quality Coordinators from the 13 states participating in the project continued to develop and deliver technology and resources to agricultural producers and rural communities across the South to enable them to better understand and respond to critical water resource issues. The project utilizes an interdisciplinary, multi-state approach to develop and deliver watershed-based water quality and quantity research and education programs. Seven Regional Program Areas were targeted: (1) Nutrient Management, (2) Animal Waste Management, (3) Irrigation Water Management, (4) Drinking Water and Rural/Urban Interface Education, (5) Water Policy and Economics, (6) Watershed Assessment and Modeling, and (7) Watershed Education and Restoration. These Regional Program Areas encompass the eight national water resource themes, and represent key areas of need for agricultural and rural communities in the South. Program teams are composed of extension and research/teaching personnel from 1862 and 1890 institutions in states targeting that issue with integrated efforts in extension, research, and education. The SRWQPC met in February in Savannah, GA and in May in Albuquerque, NM to discuss program planning and project implementation. The SRWQPC organized and conducted a major regional education, training and technology transfer conference October 15-18 in Fayetteville, AR, which was attended by 197 participants. New resources developed through the Project during the reporting period include: 11 refereed journal articles; 78 fact sheets; 66 proceedings and abstracts; 8 training manuals; 74 popular articles, radio, TV and news releases, and 8 new websites. More than 38 research/demonstration projects were implemented to evaluate and promote the use of science-based best management practices for water resource protection and enhancement. The Project continued to be heavily involved in implementing the primary goal of the Committee for Shared Leadership (CSL), which is to foster a national program in concert with CSREES by linking the 406 regional projects and their network of research, education and extension professionals. In addition, the Project assisted the CSL by organizing the National Water Conference, and updating and providing national resources including: web-based Drinking Water & Human Health FAQ database (averaging about 3,000 hits/day), National Water Program Impact Report, National Water Quality Coordinators Directory, CSREES National Water Quality Program trifold, and CSREES National Water Quality Program poster. The project enhanced collaboration with 1890 institutions through follow-up activities to the Water Quality Collaborative Conference for 1890-1862-1994 Institutions and through expanded participation on the Program Teams. The regional database at http://srwqis.tamu.edu/ is visited approximately 4,000 times per month. The regional publications search available through the regional website was upgraded and updated. PARTICIPANTS: Dr. Steve Workman is serving as interim water quality coordinator and project CoPI until the position is filled at the University of Kentucky.

Impacts
The Southern Region Water Quality Regional Coordination Project promoted regional collaboration, enhanced delivery of successful programs and encouraged multi-state efforts to protect and restore water resources. Effective approaches for watershed management, pollution prevention and youth education have been identified and shared among states. The project has improved public access to research, extension and education resources available through the Land Grant University System in the Southern Region and nationwide. Selected impact indicators include: 6,375,000 pound reduction in fertilizer nitrogen and phosphorus applied, 1,888,500 acres impacted by nutrient management plans, adoption of soil testing by ag producers increased 60% on 97,000 acres. Animal waste training was delivered throughout the region to producers, county agents, NRCS staff and private consultants to enable the development of certified CNMPs, which will affect the fate of about 3.5 million tons of manure. The regional Irrigation Water Management team delivered trainings resulting in a 15% improvement in irrigation efficiency and the conservation of 3,250,000 ac/feet of water. Improved irrigation practices were adopted in 36% of 19,000,000 irrigated acres. A multi-state Water Policy Forum titled, "The Role of Educators in the Water Planning Process" convened in Oklahoma City, March, 2007. The purpose of the Forum was for Extension educators, water policy analysts, and decision makers to share expertise, experience, approaches, and views on research and education needs with regard to water policy, water planning, and the role of science education in the area of public policy. Proceedings of the conference are available at http://waterquality.okstate.edu/events/WaterForum/. Increased understanding and adoption of appropriate BMPs and other restoration activities are being accomplished through education outreach and technology transfer via a Regional Watershed Steward Program. Pre/post testing has shown the program increases knowledge to an average of 91% and stimulates individual and community in local watershed planning efforts. To facilitate implementation, Watershed Steward Coordinators across the region developed and shared curricula and evaluation tools conserving over $450,000 in personnel and resources. About 200 water resource professional were trained at the regional water conference in Fayetteville, AR in October. Survey results indicated that program delivery capacity of 97% of conference participants was substantively increased. In addition, resulting collaborations and technology transfer have saved thousands of hours of professional time by minimizing duplicative efforts in program rand resource development. A 12-state assessment of P-index ratings based on standard scenarios was developed and used to generate a paper published in the Journal of Soil and Water Conservation evaluating state-to-state variations and potential implications for agricultural producers. The work is now being used as the foundation for regional discussion on how to improve consistency in P indices.

Publications

  • Ozores-Hampton, M., Simonne, E. H., Gilreath, P.R., Sargent, S.A., McAvoy, E.J., Stansly, P.A., Obreza, T.A., Roberts, P.D., Shukla, S., Roka, F M., Cushman, K.E. , Parmenter, D.M., McClure, D.C. and Wilkes, T. 2007. Effect of N rate on yield of tomato grown with seepage irrigation and reclaimed water. Fla. State Hort. Soc. Proc. (in press).
  • Ozores-Hampton, M., Simonne, E.H., McAvoy, E.J, Roka, F.M., Roberts, P.D., Stansly, P.A., Shukla, S., Cushman, K.E., Morgan, K.T., Obreza, T.A., Gilreath, P.R., and Parmenter, D.M. 2007. Results of nitrogen BMP tomato trials for the 2006-2007 season. p. 8-13 In Proc. 2007 Tomato Institute.
  • Pandy, C., Shukla, S., and Obreza, T.A. 2007. Development and evaluation of soil moisture based seepage irrigation management for water use and quality. J. Irrigation Drainage Eng. 133(5):435-443.
  • Peterson, J.L., McFarland, M.L., Dictson, N., Boellstorff, D. and Berg, M. 2007. Texas Watershed Steward Program. Poster Presentation. 15th Annual Nonpoint Source Monitoring Conference, Austin, TX.
  • Peterson, J.L., McFarland, M.L., Dictson, N., Boellstorff, D. and Berg, M. 2007. Texas Watershed Steward Handbook: A Water Resource Training Curriculum. 138 pp. Texas AgriLife Extension Service, College Station, TX.
  • Provin, T.L. Hons, F.M., Shahahdeh, H., Lemon R. and McFarland, M.L. 2007. Cotton Utilization of Nitrate-N from Different Soil Depths. ASA-CSSA-SSSA International Annual Conference, November 4-8, New Orleans, LA.
  • Rodekohr, D. and Hairston, JE. 2007. Water wars: examples of controversial issues and the educational implications, tri-state and Oklahoma-Texas situations. Abstract for Southern Region Water Quality Conference. Fayetteville, AR. Oct 15-17, 2007.
  • Rozzell, L.R., Zink, J. M., Penrose, D.L. and Jennings, G.D. 2007. Contributions and Limitations of a Stream Restoration Monitoring Scheme for Ten Projects in the Hiwassee River Watershed of North Carolina. Proceedings of the National Conference on Ecosystem Restoration, April 23-27, 2007. Kansas City, MO. p. 291.
  • Smith, G.F. 2007. Farm and Forest Land Preservation with Conservation Easements. Regional PowerPoint presentation completing the on-line publication listed in 5, below. Available on-line at: http://srwqis.tamu.edu/program-information/focus-areas/drinking-water -and-rural-urban-interface-education.aspx
  • Smith, G. F. 2007. Tennessee Envirothon Aquatics Study Guide. Available on-line at http://www.tnrcd.org/
  • Smith, G.F. 2007. Water Law and Regulation. AE Info 08-01. July.
  • Tsegaye T, Johnson, A., Mersie, W., Dennis, S.O. and Golson, K. 2007. Transport of atrazine through soil columns with or without switch grass roots. Journal of Food, Agriculture & Environment. Vol 5: 345-350.
  • Worthington, C.M., Portier, K.M., White, J.M., Mylavarapu, R., Obreza, T.A., Stall W.M, and Hutchinson, C.M. 2007. Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) yield and internal heat necrosis incidence under controlled-release and soluble nitrogen sources and leaching irrigation events. Am. J. Potato Res. 84:403-413.
  • Wright, A.L., Hons F.M., Lemon, R.G., McFarland, M.L., and Nichols, R. 2007. Microbial Activity and Soil C Sequestration for Reduced and Conventional Tillage Cotton. ASA-CSSA-SSSA International Annual Conference, November 4-8, New Orleans, LA.
  • Wright, A.L., Hons F.M., Lemon, R.G., McFarland, M.L., and Nichols, R. 2007 Stratification of Nutrients in Soil for Different Tillage Regimes and Cotton Rotations. Soil and Tillage Res. 96:19-27.
  • Wynn, T., Jennings, G.D. and Okay, J. 2007. Stream Restoration in the Southeastern US: Historical Perspectives, Motivations, and Approaches. The Stream Restoration Networker, National Center for Earth-surface Dynamics, Summer/Fall, 2007. pp. 10-12.
  • Mann, K., Schumann, A.W., Obreza, T.A., Harris, W.G., Sartain, J.B., Shukla, S. and Teplitski, M. 2007. Spatial patterns of physical properties in heterogeneous citrus soils of Florida. No. 103-2. In 2007 Agronomy abstracts CD-ROM, ASA, Madison, WI.
  • McFarland, M.L. 2007. The Southern Region Nutrient Management Publications Database. In: Nutrient Management in the Southern Region. R. Mylavarapu (ed.) E-Publication: 3:2.
  • McFarland, M.L. 2007. Watershed Protection Planning. Texas Plant Protection Conference. College Station, Texas.
  • McFarland, M.L. and Boellstorff, D.E. 2007. Regional Nutrient Management Publications Database. Southern Region Water Quality Coordination Information System website (update): http://srwqis.tamu.edu/media/432/pbc.pdf.
  • McFarland, M.L., Coker, D.L., Mazac, Jr., F.J., and Abrameit, A. 2007. Effects of Nitrogen Rate on Yield and Quality of Tifton 85 Bermudagrass. ASA-CSSA-SSSA International Annual Conference, November 4-8, New Orleans, LA.
  • McFarland, M., Peterson, J.L, Dictson, N.J., Boellstorff, D.E. and Berg, M. 2007. Texas Watershed Steward Program: A Water Resource Training Curriculum. Southern Region Water Quality Conference, Fayetteville, AR.
  • McNider, R., Christy. J., Bragg D., Hairston, JE and Rodekohr, D. 2007. Hydrological and hydro-illogical cycles: managing short-term droughts in the Southeast. Abstract and Power Point publication for Proceedings of USDA-CSREES Sponsored National Water Conference. Savannah, GA. Jan 28-Feb1, 2007. PowerPoint: http://www.usawaterquality.org/conferences/2007/PPTs&Posters/Meetings /Water_Quantity/McNider.pdf
  • Morgan, K.T., Scholberg, J.M., Obreza, T.A., and Wheaton, T.A. 2007. Orange tree fibrous root length distribution in space and time. J. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 132:262-269.
  • Mukhtar, S., McFarland, M.L., and Wagner, C.A. 2007. Use of Dairy Manure Compost as Erosion Control Material Under Vegetative and Non-Vegetative Conditions. ASABE (in review).
  • Mylavarapu, R.S., Wright, D., Kidder, G. and Chambliss, C.G. 2007. UF/IFAS Standardized Fertilization Recommendations for Agronomic Crops. SL129, Soil & Water Science, Cooperative Extension Service, IFAS. 10 pp.
  • Obreza, T.A. 2007. Crop water use and irrigation scheduling guide for north Florida. 18 pp.
  • Obreza, T.A., and Bauer, M.G. 2007. Peanut response to irrigation in 2007. Suwannee River Partnership News, Vol. 4, No. 3 (Winter 2007).
  • Obreza, T.A., Shukla, S., Clark, M., Jacoby, C. and Wilson, C. 2007. Floridas water supply issues: Getting involved in the educational process. USDA-CSREES National Water Conference, Jan 28-Feb1, Savannah, GA. Abstract: http://www.usawaterquality.org/conferences/2007/2007_Abstracts_PDF/Po sters/Conservation/Obreza.pdf. Poster: http://www.usawaterquality.org/conferences/2007/PPTs&Posters/Poster/O brezaFL.pdf.
  • Osmond, D.L., McFarland, M.L., Koenig, R. and Beegle, D. 2007. Phosphorus Management within Multi-state Watersheds. SERA-17. Watershed Management and Policy.
  • Cornejo, C., Mylavarapu, R.S., Hutchinson, C.M., Li, Y., Ouyang, Y. and Acharya, S. 2007. Lateral movement of subsurface water in seepage irrigated fields. USDA-CSREES National Water Conference, Jan, Savannah, GA. Abstract: http://www.usawaterquality.org/conferences/2007/2007_Abstracts_PDF/Po sters/Conservation/Cornejo.pdf.
  • Bauer, M.G., Castle, W.S., Boman, B.J. and Obreza, T.A. 2007. Field guide to soil identification for Floridas citrus-growing regions. UF-IFAS Ext. Pub. SP 362.
  • Berg, M., Dictson, N., McFarland, M.L., Wendt, A., Srinivasan, R. and Karthikeyan, K. 2007. Plum Creek Watershed Protection Planning. USDA CSREES National Water Quality Conference, Savannah, Georgia. February 2007. Abstract: http://www.usawaterquality.org/conferences/2007/2007_Abstracts_PDF/Po sters/Watershed%20Assessment%20and%20Restoration/Berg.pdf. Poster: http://www.usawaterquality.org/conferences/2007/PPTs&Posters/Poster/B ergTX.pdf.
  • Boellstorff, D.E. and McFarland, M.L. (eds.). 2007. CSREES National Integrated Water Quality Program Impact Report. Texas Cooperative Extension, College Station, Texas.
  • Boellstorff, D.E. and M.L. McFarland. 2007. Southern Region Water Quality Coordination Project. CSREES National Water Quality Conference. Proceedings posted to http://www.usawaterquality.org/conferences/2007/PPTs&Posters/Poster/B oellstorff_National.pdf for poster and http://www.usawaterquality.org/conferences/2007/2007_Abstracts_PDF/Po sters/Committee%20for%20Shared%20Leadership/Boellstorff.pdf for abstract. Savannah, Georgia.
  • Boellstorff, D.E., Tech, J. and McFarland, M.L. 2007 Southern Region Water Quality Information System. Regional Water Quality web-site. Texas Cooperative Extension, College Station, Texas. The site recorded 46,361 unique visits with 114,446 page downloads through 590,303 hits. http://srwqis.tamu.edu/
  • Branch, B., Carney, B., Castille, C., Cummins, D., Ferrin, D., Fletcher, B., Gauthier, S., Gill, D., Harrison, H., Kaster, J., Koske, T., LeBlanc, B., Owings, A., Pollet, D. Reed, D., Schmit, R., Stevens, J. and Strahan, R. 2007. A Guide to Louisiana-Friendly Landscaping. LSU AgCenter. Number 2993. pp 1-88.
  • Brantley, E. and Hairston, J.E. 2007. Eco-restoration: power of education. Abstract for USDA-CSREES National Water Conference. Savannah, GA. Jan 28-Feb1, 2007.
  • Burdine, K., Coleman, R., and Mussin, T. 2007 Temporary Fencing for Horse Pastures. University of Kentucky, College of Agriculture. ID-165.
  • Centner, T.J., Presley Fowler, C.L., Risse, L.M., Wetzstein, M.E. and Mullen, J.D. 2007. Implementing Environmental Management Systems to Protect Water Quality from Animal Waste Nutrients. Environmental Research Journal 1(3/4): 333-344.
  • Clark, C.D., Tankersley, L., Smith, G.F. and Starns, D. 2007. Farm and Forest Land Preservation with Conservation Easements. On-line publication of the Southern Region Water Quality Planning Committee. Available at http://srwqis.tamu.edu/media/2137/regionalconservationeasement.pdf
  • Cohen, M. Mylavarapu, R.S., Lee. W.S. and Clark, M. 2007. Reflectance spectroscopy for routine agronomic soil analyses. Soil Science. 172(6):569-485.
  • Coker, D.L., McFarland, M.L., Abrameit A. and Mazac, Jr., F.J. 2007. Effects of Tillage and Fertilizer Placement on Corn Yields in Texas Blackland Soils. ASA-CSSA-SSSA International Annual Conference, November 4-8, New Orleans, LA.
  • Coker, D.L., McFarland, M.L., Lemon, R.G., Mott, D. and Saladino, V. 2007. Evaluation of Nfusion Blends for Nitrogen Requirements of Cotton. Texas Plant Protection Conference Association Proceedings.
  • Cornejo, C., Mylavarapu, R.S., and Acharya, S. 2007. Measurement of lateral flow in subsurface seepage irrigation potato production systems in northeast Florida. Soil and Water Conservation Society Annual Conference, July, Tampa, FL, p. 108-109.
  • Cornejo, C., Mylavarapu, R.S., and Acharya, S. 2007. Modeling of water subsurface lateral movement of a shallow hardpan. American Society of Agricultural & Biological Engineers Annual Meeting, June, Minneapolis, MN.
  • Cornejo, C., Mylavarapu, R.S., Fan, Y. and Hutchinson, C.M. 2007. Reduced nitrate leaching by using different crops in crop rotation with potatoes. Soil and Water Conservation Society Annual Conference, July, Tampa, FL, p. 130-131.
  • Cornejo, C., Mylavarapu, R.S., and V. Villasenor. 2007. How soil moisture content affects near-infrared reflectance of sandy soils. Soil and Water Conservation Society Annual Conference, July, Tampa, FL, p. 127-128.
  • LeBlanc, B.D. 2007. Permeable Pavement as an Option to Reduce Pollutants in Stormwater Runnoff. LSU AgCenter. Number 2994-H.
  • LeBlanc, B.D. 2007. Safe Storage of Household Hazardous Waste. LSU AgCenter. Number 2994-K.
  • LeBlanc, B.D. and Castille, C. 2007. Dissolved Oxygen. LSU AgCenter. Number 2994-B.
  • Dennis, S.O., Duseja, D., Vendrell, P., Wade, A., Williams, E., Fielder K. and Branch, B. 2007. Monitoring water wells with down well camera technology. Abstract: Southern Region Water Quality Conference. Fayetteville AR. October.
  • Dennis, S.O. and Oliver, J. 2007. Persistence of an insecticide used in dip treatment of Japanese beetle grubs and imported fire ants in nursery soils. Annual Meeting of the American Society of Agronomy Southern Branch. (Abstract-CD) Mobile, AL.
  • Dennis, S.O., Smith G. F., Gardner C. and Idassi, J. 2007. Watershed Academy: Water resource capacity building for extension agents and research associates at 1890 institutions. CSREES National Water Program Conference. Savannah, GA. Abstract: http://www.usawaterquality.org/conferences/2007/2007_Abstracts_PDF/Po sters/Committee%20for%20Shared%20Leadership/Dennis.pdf. Poster: http://www.usawaterquality.org/conferences/2007/PPTs&Posters/Poster/D ennisTN.pdf.
  • Dennis, S.O., Tsegaye, T., Harrison, R. E., and Aburime, S.A. 2007. The fate of entomopathogenic nematodes in nursery soils: Implications on water quality. Journal of Environmental Monitoring and Restoration. Vol. 3:237-252.
  • Dictson, N., McFarland, M.L., Berg, M., Peterson, J.L. and Boellstorff, D.E. 2007. Plum Creek Watershed Protection Plan. 15th Annual Nonpoint Source Monitoring Conference, Austin, Texas.
  • Fredrick, J. 2007. Nonpoint Source Pollution, Spanish Version. University of Kentucky, College of Agriculture ENRI-134.
  • Fredrick, J. 2007. What is a Watershed? Spanish Version. University of Kentucky, College of Agriculture ENRI-132.
  • Garner, K., Tsegaye, T., Okweye, P., Tadesse, W. and Dennis, S.O. 2007. Spatial and temporal distribution of heavy metals in surface water of the Indian creek watershed. Journal of Environmental Monitoring and Restoration. Vol. 3:101-114
  • Gumbert, A.A. 2007. Green Living. University of Kentucky, College of Agriculture ENRI-505.
  • Gumbert, A.A. and Osborne, A.R. Kentucky Water Awareness Month Packet. 2007. University of Kentucky, College of Agriculture.
  • Hairston, J.E. 2007. Concern for and solution for water impasse. Extension Daily WWW Article. Mar 29, 2007. 2p.
  • Hairston, J.E. 2007. Disturbing message in a bottle. Extension Daily WWW Article. Aug 8, 2007. 2p.
  • Hairston, J.E. 2007. Falling star: bottled water woes. Extension Daily WWW Article. Aug 15, 2007. 2p.
  • Hairston, J.E. 2007. Have Americans come full circle since Sputnik. Extension Daily WWW Article. Sep 25, 2007. 2p.
  • Hairston, J.E. 2007. Persistence pays off for team of professors on water efforts. Extension Daily WWW Article. Nov 5, 2007. 2p.
  • Hairston, J.E. 2007. Recent heavy rain no quick fix for drought. Extension Daily WWW Article. Jun 20, 2007. 2p.
  • Hairston, J.E. 2007. Toilet to tap nothing new. Extension Daily WWW Article. Dec 6, 2007. 2p.
  • Hairston, J.E. 2007.Water use policies gaining notice. Extension Daily WWW Article. Jun 29, 2007. 2p.
  • Hairston, J.E. and Christy, J. 2007. Drought advice from the 20th century Extension Director. Extension Daily WWW Article. Sep 7, 2007. 2p.
  • Hairston, JE and Langcuster, J. 2007. Bottled water versus tap water. Abstract for Southern Region Water Quality Conference. Fayetteville, AR. Oct 15-17, 2007.
  • Hairston, J.E. and Radcliffe, D. 2007. Symposium titled Water issues in the Eastern United States. Abstract publication for Proceedings of USDA-CSREES Sponsored National Water Conference. Savannah, GA. Jan 28-Feb1, 2007. Abstract: http://www.soil.ncsu.edu/swetc/waterconf/2007/sympissues.pdf.
  • Hairston, JE and Rodekohr, D. 2007. Issues surrounding the potential eastward movement of irrigated agriculture. Abstract for Southern Region Water Quality Conference. Fayetteville, AR. Oct 15-17, 2007.
  • Hairston, JE., Rodekohr D., McNider R. and Christy, J. 2007. U.S. needs to bring agriculture back to water. Power Point publication for Proceedings of USDA-CSREES Sponsored National Water Conference. Savannah, GA. Jan 28-Feb1, 2007. Abstract: http://www.usawaterquality.org/conferences/2007/2007_Abstracts_PDF/Co nservation%20and%20Resource%20Management/Hairston.pdf; PowerPoint: http://www.usawaterquality.org/conferences/2007/PPTs&Posters/Conserva tion/Hairston.pdf.
  • Hendricks, G.S., Shukla, S., Cushman, K.E., Obreza, T.A., Roka, F.M., Portier, K.M., and McAvoy, E.J. 2007. Florida watermelon production affected by water and nutrient management. HortTechnology 17:328-335.
  • Higgins, S.F., Koostra, B., Workman, S.R., Gallagher, V.N. and Coleman, R.J. 2007. High Traffic Area Pads. University of Kentucky, College of Agriculture ID-164.
  • Higgins, S.F., Workman, S.R. and Coleman, R.J. 2007. Pervious Concrete as a Flooring Material for Horse Handling Areas. University of Kentucky, College of Agriculture ID-161.
  • Higgins, S.F., Workman, S.R., Gallagher, V.N., Stamper, D. and Coleman, R.J. 2007 Composting Horse Muck. University of Kentucky, College of Agriculture ID-168.
  • Hons, F.M., Provin, T., Shahandeh, H., Lemon, R. and McFarland, M.L. 2007. Cotton nitrate uptake from different soil depths. Texas Plant Protection Conference Association Proceedings.
  • Jennings, G.D., Doll, B.A., Patterson, J. and Clinton, D.R. 2007. Rocky Branch: An Urban Stream Rehabilitation Case Study. Proceedings of the Emerging Issues along the Urban-Rural Interfaces II: Linking Land-Use Science and Society. April 9-12, 2007, Atlanta, GA. p. 309.
  • LeBlanc, B.D. and Castille, C. 2007. Fecal Coliform. LSU AgCenter. Number 2994-C.
  • LeBlanc, B. D. and Castille, C. 2007. Nutrient Impairments. LSU AgCenter. Number 2994-G.
  • LeBlanc, B.D. and Castille, C. 2007. Sedimentation Impairments. LSU AgCenter. Number 2994-L.
  • LeBlanc, B.D., Castille, C, Koske, T., Frey, M., Stoker, M. and Hendrick, R. 2007. A Manual for Understanding and Preventing Water Pollution from Home Sources. LSU AgCenter. pp 1-27.
  • Lin, Z., Radcliffe, D.E., Beck, M.B. and Risse, L.M. 2007. Modeling Phosphorus in the Upper Etowah Basin: Identifying sources under uncertainty. Water Science and Technology 56(6): 29-37.


Progress 01/01/06 to 12/31/06

Outputs
The Southern Region Water Quality Planning Committee (SRWQPC) composed of Water Quality Coordinators from the 13 states participating in the project continued to implement an organizational structure which utilizes multi-state implementation teams to address three major Focus Areas: Agricultural Pollution Prevention, Rural Environmental Protection, and Watershed Management, which encompass the eight CSREES national water quality themes. Each Focus Area targets four specific Programs: nutrient management, animal waste management, irrigation water management, water quality education for agricultural producers, drinking water and human health, on-site wastewater management, community wastewater and solid waste management, rural/urban interface landowner education, watershed education network, watershed assessment, non-point education network for rural community decision makers and watershed restoration. Program teams are composed of extension and research/teaching personnel from 1862 and 1890 institutions in states targeting that issue with integrated efforts in extension, research, and education. Regional teams continued to develop and deliver technology and resources to agricultural producers and rural communities across the South to enable them to better understand and respond to critical water resource issues. The SRWQPC met in February in San Antonio, TX and in September in Biloxi, MS to discuss program planning and project implementation. The SRWQPC underwent review by the CSREES National Water Program in May in Orlando, FL. The review process affirmed the SRWQPC's strengths and accomplishments and provided recommendations for continuing improvement in the Project's capacity for development and delivery of resources and programs to address critical water resource concerns. Planning efforts were initiated to organize and conduct a major regional education, training and technology transfer conference to be held in Fayetteville, AR in October 2007. The SRWQPC conducted the following regional and multi-state workshops: Principles of Watershed Monitoring, Planning, and Restoration; Introduction to Stream Restoration using Natural Channel Design Techniques; Regional Master Farmer Program Training, Multi-state Down-Well Camera Video Training and Gardening by the Drop: Create Healthy Landscapes on the Rural-Urban Fringe. In addition, the Project assisted the Committee for Shared Leadership by organizing the National Water Conference, and updating and providing national resources including: web-based Drinking Water & Human Health FAQ database (averaging about 3,000 hits/day), National Water Program Impact Report, National Water Quality Coordinators Directory, CSREES National Water Quality Program trifold, and CSREES National Water Quality Program poster. The project enhanced collaboration with 1890 institutions through follow-up activities to the Water Quality Collaborative Conference for 1890-1862-1994 Institutions and through expanded participation on the Program Teams. The regional database at http://srwqis.tamu.edu/ is visited approximately 4,000 times per month.

Impacts
The Southern Region Water Quality Regional Coordination Project promoted regional collaboration, enhanced delivery of successful programs and encouraged multi-state efforts to protect and restore water resources. Effective approaches for watershed management, pollution prevention and youth education have been identified and shared among states. The project has improved public access to research, extension and education resources available through the Land Grant University System in the Southern Region and nationwide. Selected impact indicators include: 5,224,000 pound reduction in fertilizer nitrogen and phosphorus applied, 1,888,500 acres impacted by nutrient management plans, adoption of soil testing by ag producers increased 60% on 97,000 acres, 75% of 2,000 ag producers implemented a water quality BMP, wetland restoration projects implemented on 24,000 acres and stream restoration projects implemented on 120 stream miles, riparian buffer restoration projects implemented on 45,000 acres, 500 well water tests requested, and 300 soil tests requested.

Publications

  • Bass, T.M., and L.M. Risse, ed. 2006. Small Farm Nutrient Management Primer for Unpermitted Animal Feeding Operations. University of Georgia Cooperative Extension Bulletin 1293. http://www.engr.uga.edu/service/extension/agp2/aware/cig_publication. php
  • Buckner, E.R., L. Richardson, R. Felsman, M. Daniels and S. O. Dennis. 2006. Environmental Issues for Small Swine Farmers. Cooperative Extension Program, University of Arkansas Pine Bluff, FSA9518.
  • Buckner, E.R., L. Richardson and L. Hairston. 2006. Heavy Use Areas are Problems for Farmers. Risk Management News, Fall 2006.
  • Buckner, E. R., L. Richardson, R. Felsman, M. Daniels and S. O. Dennis. 2006. Environmental Issues Affecting Small Farmers Raising Hogs on Pasture. Southern Animal Manure and Waste Management Quarterly, September 2006.
  • Faucette, L.B., L.M, Risse, C.F. Jordan, M. Cabrera, D.C. Coleman, and L.T. West. 2006. Vegetation and Soil Quality Effects from Hydroseed and Compost Blankets Used for Erosion Control in Construction Activities. Journal of Soil and Water Conservation, 61(6):355-362.
  • Gardner, A. N., G. D. Jennings, W. F. Hunt, and J. F. Gilliam. 2006. Non-anadramous fish passage through road culverts. ASABE Paper 067034 presented at the 2006 ASABE Annual International Meeting, Jul 9-12, 2006, Portland, OR.
  • Gumbert, AA. 2006. Watersheds, Not Just a Shed That Holds Water, Youth Watershed Unit of Study. University of Kentucky.
  • Heemstra, J., R. Koelsch, G. Jackson, M. Risse, E. Bird, J. Lawrence, G. Surber, and B. Bland, 2006. Bringing Environmental Management Systems (EMS) to an Agricultural Audience. Proceedings of the 2006 CREES National Water Conference. http://www.extension.iastate.edu/WaterConf2006/default.aspx
  • Holder, T., J. Bonner and L. Oldham. 2006. Comprehensive Nutrient Management Plans. Mississippi State University Extension Service.
  • Holder, T., J. Bonner and L. Oldham. 2006. Mississippi Medallion Producer Program. Mississippi State University Extension Service.
  • Holder, T., J.Bonner and L. Oldham. 2006. Nutrient Management for Mississippi Producers. Mississippi State University Extension Service.
  • Holder, T., L. Oldham, B. McKinley and J. Bonner. 2006. Best Management Practices for Beef Cattle Producers. Mississippi State University Extension Service.
  • Jolly, C.V. 2006. Perception of the Quality of Drinking Water in Metropolitan Nashville. Thesis, Tennessee State University.
  • Koelsch, R.K., L.M. Risse, F. Humenik, and J. Harrison, 2006. National Learning Center for Animal Agriculture Water Quality Issues. ASABE Paper No. 068049.
  • Koske, T. 2006. Louisiana Lawn BMPs. LSU AgCenter. Pub. # 2940. 32 pages.
  • LeBlanc, B.D. and V.R. Moreira. 2006. Early Results from Evaluation of Two-Stage Lagoons and Constructed Wetlands Treatment of Dairy Waste Effluent. USDA-CSREES National Water Conference. February 5-9, 2006. San Antonio, TX. Abstract in Conference Proceedings. http://www.extension.iastate.edu/waterconf2006/
  • Leao, M.,M. Eggleton and E. R. Buckner. 2006. Fish utilization and diversity associated with created wetlands within the upper White river watershed. Arkansas Agriculture and Rural Development Research Journal of the School of Agriculture Fisheries.
  • Lin, Z. and D.E. Radcliffe. 2006. Automatic Calibration and Predictive Uncertainty Analysis of a Semi-distributed Watershed Model. VZJ. 5:248-260.
  • Lin, Z., and D.E. Radcliffe. 2006. Modeling Phosphorus Transport: Uncertainty Assessment in the Upper Etowah River Basin. AGU Annual Meeting Abstracts. 11-15 December, 2006. San Francisco, CA.
  • Mendoza, C. 2006. Implementing a State-Wide Master Farmer Program. LSU AgCenter. 41 pages.
  • Munoz-Carpena, R., S. Shukla, and K. Morgan. 2006. Field Devices for Monitoring Soil Water Content. Southern Region Water Quality Coordination Project Regional Publication: http://srwqis.tamu.edu/downloads/Field pct 20devices pct 20for pct 20monitoring pct 20soil pct 20water pct 20content.pdf
  • Osborne, A. 2006. 4-H Water Camp Agenda. University of Kentucky.
  • Osborne, A. 2006. 4-H Water Camp Program Outline. University of Kentucky.
  • Osborne, A. 2006. Disposal of Leftover Paint. ENRI-316. University of Kentucky.
  • Osborne, A. 2006. Paint Disposal: Fact Sheet for University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Agents. ENRI-320. University of Kentucky.
  • Puckett, P. R., and G. D. Jennings. 2006. Effects of Rock Cross Vane Geometry on Velocity Distribution and Contraction of Flow. ASABE Paper 062216 presented at the 2006 ASABE Annual International Mtg, Jul 9-12, 2006, Portland, OR.
  • Radcliffe, D.E., B. Bumback, S. Udvardy, P. Hartel, and L. West. 2006. Scientific Basis for Bacterial TMDLs in Georgia. White Paper. Available online at http://www.georgiaconservancy.org/WaterQuality/TMDL.pdf.
  • Radcliffe, D.E. and M.L. Cabrera. 2006. Suggestions to Improve Modeling of Phosphorus. In D.E. Radcliffe and M.L. Cabrera (ed.). Modeling Phosphorus in the Environment. Taylor and Francis Group Publishers. Boca Raton, FL. Pg. 405-415.
  • Radcliffe, D.E. and Z. Lin. 2006. Modeling phosphorus with HSPF. In D.E. Radcliffe and M.L. Cabrera (ed.). Modeling Phosphorus in the Environment. Taylor and Francis Group Publishers. Boca Raton, FL. Pg. 189-214.
  • Radcliffe, D.E., and Z. Lin. 2006. Modeling the effect of landuse change on phosphorus loading to Lake Allatoona. # 804. SSSA Annual Meeting Abstracts. SSSA. Madison, WI.
  • Radcliffe, D.E., and N.O. Nelson. 2006. Predicting Phosphorus Losses. SERA-17 Policy paper. http://www.sera17.ext.vt.edu/Documents/Predicting pct 20P pct 20Losses.pdf
  • Reutebuch, E. R. and W. Deutsch. 2006. Tallapoosa Watershed Project: A Transferable Model of Stakeholder Partnerships for Addressing Nutrient Dynamics in Southeastern Watersheds 2005 Annual Report.
  • Risse. L.M., 2006. Animal Waste Educational Requirements in the Southern Region. In: Southern Animal Manure and Waste Management Quarterly. Sanjay Shah, ed. http://srwqis.tamu.edu/downloads/SAMWMQ_2006-03.pdf
  • Risse, L.M., W.L. Bland, R. Koelsch, E.A. Bird, and T.M. Bass, 2006. An American Experience with EMSs on Livestock and Poultry Operations. (Invited paper for Special Issue on EMSs in Agriculture. Farm Policy Journal 3(4):23-31.
  • Risse, L.M., K. Harris, S. Thompson, and X. Zhu, 2006. How should we evaluate Erosion BMP's? A case study comparing silt fence materials. Proceedings of the 2006 CSREES National Water Conference. http://www.extension.iastate.edu/WaterConf2006/default.aspx
  • Risse, L.M., R. Koelsch, J. Harrison, J. Heemstra, and F. Humanik, 2006. National Livestock and Poultry Environmental Learning Center. Proceedings of the 2006 National Poultry Waste Management Symposium, Joe Hess ed. October 23-25, 2006. Springdale, Arkansas. Pp. 64-68.
  • Risse, L.M., D.E. Radcliffe, C.R. Jackson, Z. Lin, and J. Romies, 2006. A framework for trading phosphorus credits in the Lake Allatoona watershed. Proceedings of the 2006 National Poultry Waste Management Symposium, Joe Hess ed. October 23-25, 2006. Springdale, Arkansas. Pp. 19-25.
  • Risse, L.M., S. Thompson, K. Harris, and J. Governo, 2006. Efficiency Testing for Sediment Control on New Silt fence Materials, ASABE Paper No. 062250.
  • Risse, L.M., S. Thompson, K. Harris, and J. Governo, 2006. Final Report on Evaluation of SiltSaver Belt Strand Retention Fence for use as a Replacement for Type C Silt Fence. Submitted to Roger Singleton of Silt-Saver, Inc. May 31, 2006.
  • Runyan, C., T. Obreza, T.Tyson, R. Goodman, P. Tacker, R.Yager, J. Thomas, A. Johnson, G. Grabow, B. Smith, and S.Dennis. 2006. Maintenance Guide for Microirrigation Systems in the Southern Region. Southern Region Water Quality Coordination Project Regional Publication: http://srwqis.tamu.edu/downloads/SoRegionIrrigMaintGuide.pdf
  • Risse, L.M, D.E. Radcliffe, K. Rowles, R. Jackson, and L.Fowler, 2006. A Framework for Trading Phosphorus Credits in the Lake Allatoona Watershed. Proceedings of the 2006 Environmental Management Seminar, Sheraton Raleigh Hotel, Raleigh, NC. U.S. Poultry and Egg Association. CD distribution.
  • Samani, Z., H. Magallanez, and R. Skaggs. 2006. A Simple Flow Measuring Device for Farms. Southern Region Water Quality Coordination Project Regional Publication: http://srwqis.tamu.edu/downloads/Flow pct 20Measuring pct 20Device.pdf
  • Shah, S. and L.M. Risse, 2006. EPA Proposes to Revise Deadlines for NPDES Permits. In: Southern Animal Manure and Waste Management Quarterly. Sanjay Shah, ed. http://srwqis.tamu.edu/downloads/SAMWMQ_2006-03.pdf
  • Smith, G.F. 2006. Gardening by the Drop: Evaluation. AE 07-07. The University of Tennessee, Knoxville.
  • Smith, G.F. 2006. Gardening by the Drop: Follow-Up Evaluation. AE 07 14. The University of Tennessee. Knoxville.
  • Smith, G.F. 2006. 2006. Racing to Success: 2005 Southern Region Water Quality Conference Follow Up Evaluation. AE06-23. The University of Tennessee, Knoxville.
  • Smith, G.F. 2006. Tennessee Envirothon Aquatics Study Guide. Available on-line at http://www.tnrcd.org/
  • Smith, G.F. 2006. Watershed Academy: Principles of Water Quality Monitoring, Planning and Restoration. Evaluation. AE 07-10. The University of Tennessee, Knoxville.
  • Smith, G.F. and C.D. Clark. 2006. Conservation Easement Education. Paper Presented at Spurring on the Momentum. National Association of Community Development Extension Professionals Annual Conference. San Antonio, Texas. February 13-16.
  • Smith, G.F. and T.M. Johnson. 2006. Racing to Success: 2005 Southern Region Extension Water Quality Conference. DVD Report and Summary. March.
  • Spangler, J.T., G.D. Jennings, D. L. Osmond, G. L. Grabow, and D.R. Clinton. 2006. Sediment Transport Characterization of a Restored Agricultural Stream. ASABE Paper 062020 presented at the 2006 ASABE Annual International Meeting, Jul 9-12, 2006, Portland, OR.
  • Tullos, D. D., D. L. Penrose, and G. D. Jennings. 2006. Development and application of a bioindicator for benthic habitat enhancement in the North Carolina Piedmont. Ecological Engineering 27(2006)228-241.


Progress 01/01/05 to 12/31/05

Outputs
The Southern Region Water Quality Planning Committee (SRWQPC) composed of Water Quality Coordinators from the 13 states participating in the project continued to implement a new organizational structure for 2004-2008 which utilizes multi-state implementation teams to address three major Focus Areas: Agricultural Pollution Prevention, Rural Environmental Protection, and Watershed Management, which encompass the eight CSREES national water quality themes. Each Focus Area targets four specific Programs: nutrient management, animal waste management, irrigation water management, water quality education for agricultural producers, drinking water and human health, on-site wastewater management, community wastewater and solid waste management, rural/urban interface landowner education, watershed education network, watershed assessment, non-point education network for rural community decision makers and watershed restoration. Program teams are composed of extension and research/teaching personnel from 1862 and 1890 institutions in states targeting that issue with integrated efforts in extension, research, and education. The SRWQPC met in February in La Jolla, CA, May in Baton Rouge, LA and in October in Lexington, KY to discuss program planning and project implementation. Regional teams continued to develop and deliver technology and resources to agricultural producers and rural communities across the South to enable them to better understand and respond to these critical water resource issues. Substantial planning efforts were conducted by the SRWQPC to organize and conduct a major regional education, training and technology transfer conference held in Lexington, KY in October 2005, which was attended by over 200 water resource professionals. The SRWQPC conducted the following regional and multi-state workshops: Principles of Watershed Monitoring, Planning, and Restoration; Introduction to Stream Restoration using Natural Channel Design Techniques; Regional Master Farmer Program, and Regional 4-H Water Camp. The Project continued to be heavily involved in implementing the primary goal of the Committee for Shared Leadership (CSL), which is to foster a national program in concert with CSREES by linking the 406 regional projects and their network of research, education and extension professionals. In addition, the Project assisted the CSL by organizing the National Water Conference, and updating and providing national resources including: web-based Drinking Water & Human Health FAQ database, National Water Program Impact Report, National Water Quality Coordinators Directory, CSREES National Water Quality Program trifold, and CSREES National Water Quality Program poster. The project enhanced collaboration with 1890 institutions through follow-up activities to the Water Quality Collaborative Conference for 1890-1862-1994 Institutions and through expanded participation on the Program Teams. The regional database at http://srwqis.tamu.edu/ has been updated and revised to reflect the current organizational structure of the Project. The GIS data and tools available through the regional website are being upgraded and updated.

Impacts
The Southern Region Water Quality Regional Coordination Project promoted regional collaboration, enhanced delivery of successful programs and encouraged multi-state efforts to protect and restore water resources. Effective approaches for watershed management, pollution prevention and youth education have been identified and shared among states. The project has improved public access to research, extension and education resources available through the Land Grant University System in the Southern Region and nationwide.

Publications

  • Daniels, M.B., M. Wilson, and A. Baber. 2005. Introduction to Nutrient Applications in Nutrient Surplus Areas. The Arkansas Nutrient Applicator Guide. Chapter 6.
  • Daniels, M.B., M. Wilson, H. Denniston, and W. Austin. 2005. Recommending Conservation Practices in Nutrient Management Plans. The Arkansas Nutrient Management Planner Guide. Chapter 9.
  • Atiles, J., P. Vendrell, M. Risse, J. Gaskin, P. Bush, D. Kissel, and P. Herrington. 2005 The Georgia Household Water Quality. Award for project funded by region: ASAE Blue Ribbon Award for Educational Aids: Circulars Series http://www.fcs.uga.edu/extension/housing/water.html#smart
  • Beck, E.G., J. Dinger, M. McMeans, W. Thom, and K. Henken, G.. 2005. STATUS REPORT: Bacteria and Other Contaminants in Domestic Water Wells in the Jackson Purchase Region. University of Kentucky ENRI-221 and h http://www.ca.uky.edu/enri/pubs/enri_221.pdf. 6pp.
  • Bradshaw, J.K., D. Radcliffe, K. Lichtenstein, M. Risse, M. Bakker, R. Jackson, and D. Markewitz, 2005. Land Use Effects on Sediment Yield in Six Georgia Watersheds. Proceedings of the 2005 Georgia Water Resources Conference held April 25-27, 2005 at the University of Georgia. Kathryn J. Hatcher, Ed., Institute of Ecology, The University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia. Pp. 488-489.
  • Clark, C.D., L. Tankersley, G.F. Smith, and D. Starnes. 2005. Farm and Forest Land Preservation with Conservation Easements. SP 646. The University of Tennessee, Knoxville.
  • Daniels, M.B. (ed.). 2005. The Arkansas Nutrient Applicator Guide. Univ. of Arkansas Coop. Ext. Ser. Special Publication. 10 chapters.
  • Daniels, M.B. (ed.). 2005. The Arkansas Nutrient Management Planner Guide. Univ. of Arkansas Coop. Ext. Ser. Special Publication. 6 chapters.
  • Daniels, M., T. Daniel, and K. VanDevender. 2005. Phosphorus-based Nutrient Management Planning. Univ. of Arkansas Coop. Ext. Ser. Fact Sheet #FSA9516.
  • Daniels, M., T. Daniel, and K. VanDevender. 2005. Phosphorus-based Nutrient Management Planning. The Arkansas Nutrient Management Planner Guide. Chapter 7.
  • Daniels, M.B., T. Riley, K. VanDevender, A. Baber, W. Austin, and H. Denniston. 2005. Introduction to Nutrient Management Planning. The Arkansas Nutrient Management Planner Guide. Chapter 1.
  • Daniels, M.B., N. Slaton, L. Espinoza, and M. Mozzafari. 2005. (Update to) Soil Testing for Manure Management. Univ. of Arkansas Coop. Ext. Ser. Fact Sheet #FSA 1035.
  • Daniels, M.B., K. VanDevender, A. Baber, H. Denniston, and W. Austin. 2005. Developing a Nutrient Management Plan. The Arkansas Nutrient Management Planner Guide. Chapter 4.
  • Daniels, M.B., K. VanDevender, and A. Baber. 2005. Water Quality Concerns from Excessive Nutrients. The Arkansas Nutrient Applicator Guide. Chapter 2.
  • Daniels, M.B., K. VanDevender, and T. Daniel. 2005. Nutrient Management and Water Quality Concerns. The Arkansas Nutrient Management Planner Guide. Chapter 2.
  • Daniels, M.B., K. VanDevender, and M. Wilson. 2005. Principles of Application. The Arkansas Nutrient Applicator Guide. Chapter 4.
  • Daniels, M.B., M. Wilson, and A. Baber. 2005. Predicting Soil Loss in Arkansas using the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation. The Arkansas Nutrient Management Planner Guide. Chapter 6.
  • Abnee, A. and K. Henken. 2005. (An update of) What is a TMDL? University of Kentucky ENRI-135 and http://www.ca.uky.edu/enri/KWAM2002/enri135.pdf. 2pp. Agouridis, C.T., S.R. Workman, R.C. Warner, and G.D. Jennings. 2005. Livestock grazing management impacts on stream water quality. J. Am Water Res. Assoc. 41(3): 591-606.
  • Dictson, N., M.L. McFarland, D.E. Boellstorff and C. Gerngross. 2005. The Texas Watershed Steward Program. Texas Cooperative Extension. College Station, Texas.
  • Dozier, M.C. and M.L. McFarland. 2005. Shock Chlorination of Stored Water Supplies. E-351. Texas Cooperative Extension, College Station, Texas.
  • Tyson, T. 2005. A WebCT Based CAWV Training and Education Verification Site http://www.aces.edu/dept/aawm/WebCTCAWV.php?ACAWV
  • Tyson, T.W. 2005. CAFO Compliance Flags, in Southern Animal Manure and Waste Quarterly, April 2005, pp 3-5, http://srwqis.tamu.edu/downloads/SAMWMQ_2005-04.pdf
  • VanDevender, K. and M.B. Daniels. 2005. Developing an Overall Farm Nutreint Inventory, Needs, and Budget. The Arkansas Nutrient Management Planner Guide. Chapter 8.
  • VanDevender, K., M.B. Daniels, and M. Wilson. 2005. Recordkeeping. The Arkansas Nutrient Management Planner Guide. Chapter 10.
  • VanDevender, K., M.B. Daniels, P. Tacker and G. Huitink. 2005. Calibrating Nutrient Application Equipment. The Arkansas Nutrient Applicator Guide. Chapter 5.
  • VanDevender, K., M. Wilson, and M.B. Daniels. 2005. Recordkeeping. The Arkansas Nutrient Applicator Guide. Chapter 6.
  • Vendrell, P., T. Pagan, L.M. Risse, and W. Thom, 2005. A Closer Look and Southeast Regional Drinking Water Wells: Identifying Problems Using a Downwell Video Camera. Proceedings of the 2005 Georgia Water Resources Conference held April 25-27, 2005 at the University of Georgia. Kathryn J. Hatcher, Ed., Institute of Ecology, The University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia. Pp. 707-712.
  • Espinoza, L., N. Slaton, M. Mozaffari, and M.B. Daniels. 2005. The Use of Poultry Litter in Row Crops. Univ. of Arkansas Coop. Ext. Ser. Fact Sheet #FSA2147-2M-4-05N.
  • Espinoza, L., R. Norman, N. Slaton, and M. Daniels. 2005. The nitrogen and phosphorus cycles. Univ. of Arkansas Coop. Ext. Ser. Fact Sheet #FSA2148-2M-10-05N
  • Faucette, L.B., C.F. Jordan, L.M, Risse, M. Cabrera, D.C. Coleman, and L.T. West, 2005. Evaluation of Storm Water from Compost and Conventional Erosion Control Practices in Construction Activities. Journal of Soil and Water Conservation 60(6):288-297.
  • Fowler, C.L.P., T. Centner, and L.M. Risse, 2005. Agricultural Environmental Management Systems to Protect Water Quality. Proceedings of the 2005 Georgia Water Resources Conference held April 25-27, 2005 at the University of Georgia. Kathryn J. Hatcher, Ed., Institute of Ecology, The University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia. Pp. 601-605.
  • Gaskin, J.W., K. Harris, M. Cabrera, and L.M. Risse, 2005. Using the Georgia P-Index to Identify High Risk Management of Poultry Litter. Proceedings of the 2005 Georgia Water Resources Conference held April 25-27, 2005 at the University of Georgia. Kathryn J. Hatcher, Ed., Institute of Ecology, The University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia. Pp. 478-481.
  • Gaskin, J.W., L.M. Risse, J.R. Kastner, and W.J. McLaurin, 2005. Evaluating Onsite Beneficial Reuse of Ground Engineered Wood Wastes from Residential Construction. Transactions of ASAE 48(5):1731-1738.
  • Helton, T.J., M.L. McFarland, F.M. Hons, S. Muhktar and J. Muir. 2005. Using Dairy Manure Compost and Supplemental Fertilizer to Balance Nutrient Requirements in an Impaired Watershed. ASA-SSSA-CSSA. National Conference. Salt Lake City, Utah. November 2005.
  • Risse, L.M., R.E. Koelsch, W. L. Bland, E.A. Bird and T.M. Bass, 2005. EMSs to Improve Compliance on Livestock and Poultry Operations. Proceedings of the Seventh International Symposium on Livestock Environments held in Beijing, China May 18-20, 2005. American Society of Agricultural Engineers, St. Joseph, Michigan. pp. 504-514. http://asae.frymulti.com/abstract.asp?aid=18406&t=1
  • Showers, W.J., C.M. Williams, and G.D. Jennings. 2005. Impact of Large Poultry Operations on Groundwater: Stable 15N Isotopes of Nitrate Assessment. International Journal of Poultry Science 4 (10).
  • Slaton, N., K. Brye, M. Daniels, T. Daniel, R. Norman, D. Miller. 2004. Nutrient Input and Removal Trends for Agricultural Soils in Nine Geographical Regions in Arkansas. J. Environ. Qual. 33:1606-1615.
  • Smith, G.F. 2005 Racing to Success: Southern Region Water Quality Conference Evaluation. AE06-11. The University of Tennessee, Knoxville.
  • Thom, W. 2005. 2005 Kentucky Water Awareness Month Resource Packet. http://www.ca.uky.edu/enri/kwam.htm
  • Henken, K. 2005. University of Kentucky ENRI -223. Water Recreation: Play it Safe and Healthy. http://www.ca.uky.edu/enri/KWAM2005b_files/wtrsafety.pdf. 2 pp.
  • Henken, K. 2005. University of Kentucky ENRI Downloadable Display. Things You Can do on the Farm for Water Quality. http://www.ca.uky.edu/enri/Ag_display.htm.
  • Henken, K. 2005. University of Kentucky ENRI Downloadable Display. Water and Health. http://www.ca.uky.edu/fcs/areas/health/water/index.htm. Hons, F.M. M.L. McFarland, and R.G. Lemon. 2005. Improving the Efficiency of Nitrogen Management in Cotton. In: Proceedings of the Southern Plant Nutrient Conference. Olive Branch, Mississippi. October 2005.
  • Hons, F.M. M.L. McFarland, R.G. Lemon, R.L. Nichols, R.K. Boman, F.J. Mazac, Jr., R.L. Jahn and J.R. Stapper. 2005. Environmental and Economic Nitrogen Management in Cotton. L-5458. Texas Cooperative Extension, College Station, Texas.
  • Jaber, F. H., S. Shukla, T.A. Obreza, P.J. Stoffella, and E.A. Hanlon. 2005. Impact of organic amendments on groundwater nitrogen concentrations for sandy and calcareous soils. Compost Sci. & Utiliz.13:194-202.
  • McFarland, M.L. 2005. Soil Fertility, Nutrient Management and Watersheds. In: Proceedings of the Texas Watershed Management Conference. Ft. Worth, Texas. October 2005.
  • McFarland, M.L. and D.E. Boellstorff (eds.). 2005. National Integrated Water Quality Program Impact Report. 44 pp.
  • McFarland ML., D.E. Boellstorff, T.L. Provin, M.C. Dozier and N.J. Dictson. 2005. What You Should Do If Your Water Well Has Been Flooded. Texas Cooperative Extension. College Station, Texas.
  • Mitchell, C.C. and M.L. McFarland. 2005. Nutrient Issues in Urban Versus Agricultural Soils. In: Proceeding of the Southern Plant Nutrient Conference. Olive Branch, Mississippi. October 2005.
  • Obreza, T.A., and R.S. Mylavarapu. 2005. Soil testing can save money and prevent nutrient loss. Suwannee Partnership Newsletter 2:5.
  • Ozores-Hampton, M., P.A. Stansly, and T.A. Obreza. 2005. Heavy metal accumulation in a sandy soil and in pepper fruit following long-term application of organic amendments. Compost Sci. & Utiliz. 13:60-64.
  • Pagan, T., P. Vendrell, and L.M. Risse, 2005. Well Protection Solutions: New Tools for Educating Individuals on Wellhead Management. Proceedings of the 2005 Georgia Water Resources Conference held April 25-27, 2005 at the University of Georgia. Kathryn J. Hatcher, Ed., Institute of Ecology, The University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia. Pp. 718-720.
  • Provin, T.L., S.E. Feagley, J.L. Pitt, and M.L. McFarland. 2005. Soil Testing Following Flooding, Overland Flow of Waste Waters and Other Water Related Disasters. Texas Cooperative Extension. College Station, Texas.
  • Provin, T., M.L. McFarland, J. Pitt and J.S. Waskom. 2005. Nutrient Status of Texas Agricultural and Urban Soils: Water Quality Implications. ASA-SSSA-CSSA. National Conference. Salt Lake City, Utah. November 2005.
  • Risse, L.M., T.M. Bass, and C.W. Ritz, 2005. A review of Georgia Animal Feeding Operation Regulations. University of Georgia Cooperative Extension Bulletin Number 1257. http://pubs.caes.uga.edu/caespubs/pubcd/B1257.htm
  • Risse, L.M., L.B. Faucette, J.W. Gaskin, C.F. Jordan, M. Cabrera, and L.T. West, 2005. Field Evaluation of Composts and Mulches for Erosion Control. Proceedings of the 2005 Georgia Water Resources Conference held April 25-27, 2005 at the University of Georgia. Kathryn J. Hatcher, Ed., Institute of Ecology, The University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia. Pp. 621-625.
  • Vendrell, P., T. Pagan, L.M. Risse, and W. Thom. Well... What do you know? An Introduction to protecting your well and drinking water, 2005. An educational DVD produced by the University of Georgia.
  • Wilson, M., M.B. Daniels, and A. Baber. 2005. Farm Assessment and Inventory. The Arkansas Nutrient Management Planner Guide. Chapter 5.


Progress 09/15/04 to 12/31/04

Outputs
The Southern Region Water Quality Planning Committee (SRWQPC) composed of Water Quality Coordinators from the 13 states of EPA Regions 4 and 6 met in October in Tunica, MS to conduct program planning and facilitate project implementation and reporting. The SRWQPC began implementing a new organizational structure for 2004-2008 which will utilize multi-state implementation teams to address three major Focus Areas: Agricultural Pollution Prevention, Rural Environmental Protection, and Watershed Management, which encompass the eight CSREES national water quality themes. Each Focus Area targets four specific Programs with integrated efforts in extension, research, and education. The Programs are nutrient management, animal waste management, irrigation water management, water quality education for agricultural producers, drinking water and human health, on-site wastewater management, community wastewater and solid waste management, rural/urban interface landowner education, watershed education network, watershed assessment, non-point education network for rural community decision makers and watershed restoration. Program teams will be composed of extension and research/teaching personnel from 1862 and 1890 institutions in states targeting that issue. Substantial planning efforts were conducted by the SRWQPC to plan and organize a major regional education, training and technology transfer conference to be held in Lexington, KY in October 2005. The SRWQPC conducted multi-state Watershed Academies in North Carolina and Alabama focusing on Principles of Water Quality Monitoring, Planning and Restoration. The project enhanced collaboration with 1890 institutions through follow-up activities to the Water Quality Collaborative Conference for 1890-1862-1994 Institutions and through expanded participation on the newly developed Program Teams. The regional database at http://srwqis.tamu.edu/ is being updated and revised to reflect the current organizational structure of the Southern Region Water Quality Coordination Project. The GIS tools data and tools available through the regional website will be updated in February, 2005. The project continued to be heavily involved in implementing the primary goals of the CSREES Committee for Shared Leadership by coordinating development of a National Impact Report describing the National Integrated Water Quality Program and featuring impacts of the Regional Coordination Projects; Integrated Research, Education and Extension Projects; Extension Education Projects; and National Facilitation Projects. The National Impact Report will be published in January 2005. The regional land grant university publications search function also was updated and is currently in use.

Impacts
The Southern Region Water Quality Regional Coordination Project promoted regional collaboration, enhanced delivery of successful programs and encouraged multi-state efforts to protect and restore water resources. Effective approaches for watershed management, pollution prevention and youth education have been identified and shared among states. The project has improved public access to research, extension and education resources available through the Land Grant University System in the Southern Region and nationwide.

Publications

  • No publications reported this period