Source: MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIV submitted to
ECONOMIC IMPACT OF SEAFOOD HARVESTING, PROCESSING AND DISTRIBUTION IN COASTAL MISSISSIPPI
Sponsoring Institution
State Agricultural Experiment Station
Project Status
TERMINATED
Funding Source
Reporting Frequency
Annual
Accession No.
0184913
Grant No.
(N/A)
Project No.
MIS-089020
Proposal No.
(N/A)
Multistate No.
(N/A)
Program Code
(N/A)
Project Start Date
Mar 1, 2000
Project End Date
Feb 28, 2004
Grant Year
(N/A)
Project Director
Posadas, B.
Recipient Organization
MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIV
(N/A)
MISSISSIPPI STATE,MS 39762
Performing Department
COASTAL RES & EXTENSION CENTER
Non Technical Summary
No current economic impact data available for the Mississippi seafood industry. To use existing data for analysis of economic impact of the seafood industry on coastal Mississippi counties.
Animal Health Component
100%
Research Effort Categories
Basic
(N/A)
Applied
100%
Developmental
(N/A)
Classification

Knowledge Area (KA)Subject of Investigation (SOI)Field of Science (FOS)Percent
60508993010100%
Goals / Objectives
Categorize, inventory and assess the impacts of the seafood harvesting, processing, and distribution industry on coastal Mississippi, using available production information, published data and established economic impact multipliers.
Project Methods
Using established information, develop an economic impact model for use by state natural resource management agencies.

Progress 03/01/00 to 02/28/04

Outputs
The Gulf of Mexico commercial offshore aquaculture industry would include the production, processing and distribution of aquaculture species. The use of cages to grow food fish in the Gulf waters had been a subject to recent research efforts and commercial ventures. Three-inch red drum fingerlings were raised to market-size fish in less than 12 months in a research project off Freefort, Texas. The Gulf of Mexico Offshore Aquaculture Consortium attempted to grow cobia from in an experimental cage 40 km off Pascagoula, Mississippi. The overall goal of this paper was to estimate the potential economic impact of the establishment of economically viable commercial offshore aquaculture production systems in the Gulf. The potential impact of the industry was estimated by using IMPLAN and the 2000 Gulf states data which facilitated the use of the most appropriate multipliers. Commercial offshore aquaculture production was represented by the 'Miscellaneous livestock' sector. Commercial seafood processing was represented by the 'Prepared Fresh or Frozen Fish or Seafood' sectors. The ex-vessel values of the Gulf commercial fishing and processing sectors were retrieved from the National Marine Fisheries Service database. The direct effects created by the establishment and operation of a single production system with 12 cages would generate indirect and induced effects. Indirect effects consist of the inter-industry effects of the input-output analysis. Induced effects consist of the impact of household expenditures in input-output analysis. The sum of the direct, indirect, and induced effects is equal to the total economic impact measured in terms of output ($), jobs, labor income ($), and tax collections ($).

Impacts
The economic impact of offshore aquaculture production in the Gulf of Mexico was estimated upon the request of the Gulf of Mexico Offshore Aquaculture Consortium.

Publications

  • Posadas, B. C., and C. J. Bridger. 2005. Economic Feasibility and Impact of Offshore Aquaculture in the Gulf of Mexico. MASGP 04---. In Bridger, C. J. (ed.). Efforts to Develop a Responsible Offshore Aquaculture Industry in the Gulf of Mexico: A Compendium of Offshore Aquaculture Consortium Research. Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant Consortium, Ocean Springs, MS. In press.
  • Posadas, B. C. 2004. Potential Economic Impact of Commercial Offshore Aquaculture in the Gulf of Mexico. Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant Program publication MASGP 04-036. Online proceedings of the 2004 IMPLAN Users Conference sponsored by the National Marine Fisheries Service in Sheperdstown, West Virginia on October 6-8.


Progress 01/01/03 to 12/31/03

Outputs
The oyster industry contributed $71.92 million to total output, created 1,594 jobs, generated $24.23 million labor income and added $4.31 million to indirect business tax collections. The sectoral contributions to total economic impact produced by the industry, however, leaned heavily on the distribution sector. Oyster distribution establishments produced about 77 percent of the total output effects while the primary production sector contributed the remaining 23 percent. The harvesting and processing establishments have shown remarkable improvements in efficiency during the last ten years. High dependence on oysters landed from other states, however, limited the expansion in oyster processing in the state.

Impacts
The information on the economic impact of the Mississippi oyster industry was requested by the Mississippi Department of Marine Resources to handle the effects of the ban imposed by California on the sale of unprocessed oysters during summer months.

Publications

  • Posadas, Benedict C. 2003. Economic Impact of the Mississippi Oyster Industry at the Year 2000. Mississippi State University, Coastal Research and Extension Center, Biloxi, MS.
  • Posadas, Benedict C. 2003. Economic Impact of Sport Fishing In Mississippi, 2001. Mississippi State University Coastal Research and Extension Center, Mississippi Sea Grant Extension Program, Biloxi, Mississippi.


Progress 01/01/02 to 12/31/02

Outputs
Estimates of the economic impact of the Mississippi seafood industry are broken down by major species landed and processed in the state -- primarily shrimp, oysters, crabs and foodfish. In order to capture the structural changes which occurred in the regional economy during the last decade, estimates were made every three years starting in 1991. The commercial seafood industry consists of the harvesting, processing, wholesaling, retailing and restaurant sectors. The commercial harvesting sector is comprised of commercial fishermen using various gears on board vessels (> 5 tons) and boats (< 5 tons). The seafood processing sector involves plants engaged in primary wholesale and processing. The seafood wholesaling sector includes secondary wholesale and processing activities. The seafood retailing sector referred to retail trade from stores. The seafood restaurant sector dealt with retail trade from food service. Estimates for 2000 are currently in progress since seafood processing data become available toward the end of the succeeding year.

Impacts
The overall economic impact of the Mississippi seafood industry increased from $386 million in 1991, $434 million in 1994 to $654 million in 1997. Shrimp, foodfish, oyster and crab harvesting, processing and distribution activities contributed 67, seven, five and one percent, respectively, to total seafood industrial output produced in 1997. Edible species contributed about four-fifths of total output effects while industrial species and measurement errors accounted for the remaining one-fifth of total output effects. Continued economic expansion of the Mississippi seafood industry during the years under consideration can be attributed partially to the stability in the commercial harvesting and seafood processing sectors and mostly to the continued growth in the seafood distribution sectors.

Publications

  • No publications reported this period


Progress 01/01/01 to 12/31/01

Outputs
This study attempts to estimate the economic impact of the Mississippi seafood industry in three-year intervals starting in 1991. Changes in the economic structure of the Mississippi seafood industry were displayed by the variations in the sectoral multipliers during the years under consideration. Local spending by both the harvesting and processing sectors declined due to changing internal and external environments affecting the seafood industry. Support infrastructure for the commercial fishing industry had diminished and sustained seafood processing required inflow of raw seafood products from outside sources. Updated estimates will be made for the year 2000 as soon as data from the National Marine Fisheries Service/Fisheries Statistics and Economics Division become available. Economic impact estimates are usually requested by industry managers and regulators at the beginning of each fiscal year for planning and budgetary purposes.

Impacts
The overall economic impact of the Mississippi seafood industry increased from $386 million in 1991, $434 million in 1994 to $654 million in 1997. Shrimp, foodfish, oyster and crab harvesting, processing and distribution activities contributed 67, seven, five and one percent, respectively, to total seafood industrial output produced in 1997. Edible species contributed about four-fifths of total output effects while industrial species and measurement errors accounted for the remaining one-fifth of total output effects. Continued economic expansion of the Mississippi seafood industry during the years under consideration can be attributed partially to the stability in the commercial harvesting and seafood processing sectors and mostly to the continued growth in the seafood distribution sectors.

Publications

  • Posadas, B. C. Economic Impact of Seafood Harvesting, Processing and Distribution in Mississippi: 1991, 1994, 1997 and 2000. Mississippi State University, Coastal Research and Extension Center, Biloxi, Mississippi. In preparation.
  • Posadas, B. C. 2001. Economic Impact of Recreational Fishing in Mississippi. Power Point Presentation. Mississippi State University, Coastal Research and Extension Center, Biloxi, Mississippi. http://www.msstate.edu/dept/crec/impact.html)
  • Posadas, B. C. Comparative Monthly Prices of Selected Shrimp Products, January 1998 - August 2001. Power Point Presentation. Mississippi State University, Coastal Research and Extension Center, Biloxi, Mississippi.
  • Posadas, B. C. U. S. Monthly Shrimp Imports, January 1998 - July 2001. Power Point Presentation. Power Point Presentation. Mississippi State University, Coastal Research and Extension Center, Biloxi, Mississippi.
  • Posadas, B. C. 2001. Summary of Current Fishery Statistics in Mississippi, 1998-20. Mississippi State University, Coastal Research and Extension Center, Biloxi, Mississippi. (http://msstate.edu/dept/crec/fwmr.html)


Progress 01/01/00 to 12/31/00

Outputs
Estimates of the economic impact of the Mississippi seafood industry are broken down by major species landed and processed in the state -- primarily shrimp, oysters, crabs and foodfish. In order to capture the structural changes which occurred in the regional economy during the last decade, estimates were made for 1991, 1994 and 1997. The economic impact of the industry was estimated by using IMPLAN Professional 2.0 Software and the 1991, 1994 and 1997 MS State IMPLAN Files. The commercial seafood industry consists of the harvesting, processing, wholesaling, retailing and restaurant sectors. The overall economic impact of the Mississippi seafood industry increased from $386 million in 1991, $434 million in 1994 to $654 million in 1997. Shrimp, foodfish, oyster and crab harvesting, processing and distribution activities contributed 67, 7, 5 and 1 percent, respectively, to total seafood industrial output produced in 1997. Edible species contributed about 4/5 of total output effects while industrial species and measurement errors accounted for the remaining 1/5 of total output effects. Continued economic expansion of the Mississippi seafood industry during the years under consideration can be attributed partially to the stability in the commercial harvesting and seafood processing sectors and mostly to the continued growth in the seafood distribution sectors.

Impacts
The Mississippi Department of Marine Resources used this information in planning for the support infrastructure needed by the commercial seafood industry in the region. Results were presented in digital format to facilitate the dissemination of information to fishery managers, regulators and policy makers.

Publications

  • Posadas, B.C. 2000. Tilapia Marketing in the Northern Gulf of Mexico Region. In Costa-Pierce, B. C. and J. E. Rakocy, Editors. Tilapia Aquaculture in the Americas. Volume Two. World Aquaculture Society, Baton Rouge, Louisiana.