Source: UNIV OF CALIFORNIA (VET-MED) submitted to
BOVINE ABORTION
Sponsoring Institution
Cooperating Schools of Veterinary Medicine
Project Status
TERMINATED
Funding Source
Reporting Frequency
Annual
Accession No.
0177511
Grant No.
(N/A)
Project No.
CALV-BA-95-23
Proposal No.
(N/A)
Multistate No.
(N/A)
Program Code
(N/A)
Project Start Date
Jul 1, 1994
Project End Date
Jun 30, 2004
Grant Year
(N/A)
Project Director
Osburn, B. I.
Recipient Organization
UNIV OF CALIFORNIA (VET-MED)
(N/A)
DAVIS,CA 95616
Performing Department
ADMINISTRATION
Non Technical Summary
(N/A)
Animal Health Component
50%
Research Effort Categories
Basic
50%
Applied
50%
Developmental
(N/A)
Classification

Knowledge Area (KA)Subject of Investigation (SOI)Field of Science (FOS)Percent
31134101090100%
Knowledge Area
311 - Animal Diseases;

Subject Of Investigation
3410 - Dairy cattle, live animal;

Field Of Science
1090 - Immunology;
Goals / Objectives
This study has been directed to determining the epizootiology, etiology, diagnosis and control of important abortion problems, such as epizootic bovine abortion occurring in cattle in California.
Project Methods
The approach to investigating the problem includes epidemiology, microbiol-virologic, bacteriologic, pathologic, entomologic and immunologic evaluation of field cases and the attempt to experimentally reproducing the disease in question.

Progress 07/01/94 to 06/30/04

Outputs
This is a collaborative effort by faculty researchers from University of California Davis and University of Nevada at Reno. Research focuses on 3 areas 1) Pathogenesis and establishment of a tissue repository, 2) Identification and characterization of the etiologic agent, 3) Georgraphic distribution of the tick vector and causative agent. In future years, these projects will be tracked individually rather than as a collaborative report.

Impacts
This project continues to provide invaluable tissues from EBA-infected bovine fetuses and live populations of the EBA tick vector, O coriaceus, for multiple projects directed at defining the ecology, pathogenesis and causative agent of EBA. School of Veterinary Medicine researchers have successfully identified the etiologic agent of EBA and developed the first diagnostic proble for the agent in necropsy tissue and the tick vector. This research has demonstrated that the tick vector of eBA is present in both Nevada and Oregon and that the etiologic agent of EBA is present. Thus, eBA

Publications

  • No publications reported this period


Progress 01/01/00 to 12/31/00

Outputs
This is a continuing, collaborative effort by faculty researchers from University of California Davis and University of Nevada at Reno. Research focuses on 3 areas 1) Pathogenesis and establishment of a tissue repository, 2) Identification and characterization of the etiologic agent, 3) Georgraphic distribution of the tick vector and causative agent.

Impacts
This project continues to provide invaluable tissues from EBA-infected bovine fetuses and live populations of the EBA tick vector, O coriaceus, for multiple projects directed at defining the ecology, pathogenesis and causative agent of EBA. School of Veterinary Medicine researchers have successfully identified the etiologic agent of EBA and developed the first diagnostic proble for the agent in necropsy tissue and the tick vector. This research has demonstrated that the tick vector of eBA is present in both Nevada and Oregon and that the etiologic agent of EBA is present. Thus, eBA

Publications

  • No publications reported this period


Progress 01/01/99 to 12/31/99

Outputs
This is a continuing, collaborative effort by faculty researchers from University of California Davis and University of Nevada at Reno. The group has identified the first infectious tissue and they have identified what appears to be a unique 18SrDNA gene in tissues and the pajaroello tick that appears to be associated with infection. The current focus is on collecting ticks and tissues that can be used for agent identification which can be used to continue the search for the causative agent.

Impacts
This work will lead to a much better appreciation for the geographic distribution of the EBA agent and its' vector. We suspect the disease (embryonic mortality as well as late term abortion) is much more widespread than the literature suggests and should be recognized as a major deterrent to cattle production in multiple western states and Mexico.

Publications

  • No publications reported this period


Progress 01/01/98 to 12/31/98

Outputs
Collaborative efforts span multiple departments in two institutions (University of California at Davis and University of Nevada at Reno), including Veterinary Extension specialists and Farm Advisors. The majority of studies are directed at defining the etiologic agent of EBA using both classical and molecular biological techniques. Major efforts are currently directed at: 1. Establishing a repository of fetal tissues that have been determined to harbor the agent as determined by experimental disease transmission, 2. Experimental induction of immunity utilizing infectious material, 3. Identification of antibiotic sensitivity, 4. Application of classical culture and microscopy techniques for agent identification, 5. Application of molecular biological techniques for identification of genetic sequences of the EBA pathogen, and 6. Defining the distribution of the vector in the Western US and determining the percentage carrying the EBA agent.

Impacts
Progress to date has demonstrated that immunization of cattle with EBA-infectious thymus, prior to breeding, can protect against subsequent EBA challenge. The EBA agent is antibiotic susceptible. Genetic sequences of the EBA agent has been cloned and sequenced.

Publications

  • A complete listing of publications for 1998 can be obtained from Dr. Jeff Stott at the University of California Davis and Dr. M. Hall at the University of Nevada at Reno.


Progress 01/01/97 to 12/31/97

Outputs
This collaborative project to elucidate the causative agent of Epizootic Bovine Abortion has been directed by Dr. Jeff Stott for the past two years. During that time, we have shows tha the agent(s) responsible for this disease are found in the thymus of affected fetuses. Approximately 2/3 of thymic homogenates from EBA fetuses have been able to reproduce the characteristic lesions when inoculated into susceptible, pregnant heifers. Standard microbiological culture and electron microscopy havea been unable to demonstrate a causative agent. Current trials are underway to determine whether the still unknown agent may be susceptible to antibiotics. In addition, we are using molecular probes in attempts to characterize agents that may not be cultivated.

Impacts
(N/A)

Publications

  • A complete listing of publications may be obtained from the School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California Davis.