Source: UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI submitted to
WINTER WHEAT BREEDING PROGRAM
Sponsoring Institution
National Institute of Food and Agriculture
Project Status
TERMINATED
Funding Source
Reporting Frequency
Annual
Accession No.
0155541
Grant No.
(N/A)
Project No.
MO-PSSL0097
Proposal No.
(N/A)
Multistate No.
(N/A)
Program Code
(N/A)
Project Start Date
Jul 1, 2000
Project End Date
Jun 30, 2006
Grant Year
(N/A)
Project Director
McKendry, A. L.
Recipient Organization
UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI
(N/A)
COLUMBIA,MO 65211
Performing Department
PLANT SCIENCES
Non Technical Summary
A breeding program aimed at developing varieties with improved grain yield, disease resistance and end use quality is essential to profitable wheat production in Missouri and ensures a reliable and nutritious food supply. This research will lead to the development of varieties of soft red winter wheat that will be maximally productive and marketable in both the domestic and export markets.
Animal Health Component
40%
Research Effort Categories
Basic
30%
Applied
40%
Developmental
30%
Classification

Knowledge Area (KA)Subject of Investigation (SOI)Field of Science (FOS)Percent
2011542108030%
2041542108030%
2121542108040%
Goals / Objectives
To develop and release varieties of soft red winter wheat and/or enhanced germplasm with improved grain yield and end use quality. 2. To increase the biological efficiency of soft red winter wheat through the identification and introgression of genes for traits, for example disease resistance, that are important to production in Missouri. 3. To increase the efficiency of breeding for traits associated with enhanced biological efficiency through genetic studies of both a basic and applied nature. 4. To investigate the genetics of resistance to scab in the soft red winter wheat cultivar, Ernie. 5. To identify the critical chromosome(s) associated with scab resistance in Ernie. 6. To map the gene or genes conferring Type II resistance to Fusarium head blight in `Ernie' in an effort to identify all major quantitative trait loci (QTL) for resistance in this cultivar. 7. To conduct a targeted, aggressive, world-wide search for resistance to Fusarium head blight through a systematic search of winter wheat cultivars, breeding lines and land-races currently maintained in the National Small Grains Collection at Aberdeen, Idaho. 8. To initiate genetic analyses, both conventional and molecular, of resistance in accessions identified within the national collection and conduct allelism tests with other, known sources of resistance.
Project Methods
Conventional breeding procedures will be used for variety development including modified pedigree and single seed descent breeding methods. Backcrossing will be used to introduce genes into otherwise elite genetic backgrounds. Parental material will consist of commercial cultivars, elite breeding lines, elite breeding lines from other programs acquired through regional breeding nurseries and germplasm acquired from The Center for Maize and Wheat Improvement (CIMMYT) in Mexico and the National Small Grains Collection. Segregating populations (F2 and F3) will be advanced in the field as unselected bulks. Selections for highly heritable traits will be initiated in the F4 and selections grown as F5 head rows. F5 head rows will be bulked and yield tested over locations and years for 3-5 years prior to release. A lattice design with 3-4 replications will be used for all replicated testing. Multi-location analyses will be conducted using a randomized complete block design. Agronomic data including yield, test weight, maturity, height, and milling and baking quality will be collected on all plots. Quality of all lines being advanced in the program will be evaluated by the USDA-ARS Soft Wheat Quality Laboratory at Wooster, OH. Disease data will be collected using published approaches for prevalent diseases including but not restricted to Fusarium head blight (scab), leaf rust, Septoria species, powdery mildew, barley yellow dwarf virus, soilborne mosaic virus, and wheat streak virus in years and locations where they occur. Research within the breeding program will primarily focus on enhancing the Fusarium head blight (scab) resistance in winter wheat. Germplasm from the National Small Grains Collection will be screened for Type I (incidence), Type II (spread in the spike), Type III (kernel quality) and Type IV (toxin level) using appropriated published methodologies. Lines with high levels of resistance will be progeny tested for verification and multiplied for increase. Genetic analyses of newly identified sources of resistance will be conducted using either chi-squared analyses of conventional Mendelian ratios or six generation means and variance analyses. All genetic analyses will involve crossing of the resistant source with the common susceptible Missouri advanced breeding line MO 94-317 Mapping genes to chromosomes will involve monosomic analyses and molecular mapping using AFLP and/or SSR markers. Different sources of resistance will be pyramided into single varieties using recurrent and marker assisted selection techniques.

Progress 07/01/00 to 06/30/06

Outputs
OUTPUTS: The major objective of the Wheat Breeding Project is to develop varieties of soft red winter wheat and/or enhanced germplasm with improved grain yield, quality and disease resistance. Research from 2000 through 2006 focused on the identification and genetic analyses of new sources of resistance to Fusarium head blight (scab). Several new incidental sources of resistance, comparable to or better than that in the soft red winter wheat cultivar Ernie were identified from Missouri breeding germplasm including Truman, released in 2004 and Bess, released in 2006. Both varieties were classified in the Winter Wheat Scab Nursery as resistant in all seven categories of resistance measured. Both Truman and Bess are widely adapted across the northern U.S. Corn Belt, Western Ontario Canada and the U.S. Mid-south regions and have been widely adopted by growers in those regions. Both varieties have served as resistant check varieties in the Northern or Southern Uniform FHB nurseries since their release. Bess is also a check variety in the Uniform Eastern Soft Red Winter Wheat Nursery. For the moderately resistant cultivar Ernie, a mapping population of recombinant inbred lines (RILs) was developed and QTL associated with type II FHB resistance were identified. The genes in Ernie appear to differ from those in the widely used Chinese source, Sumai 3. We concluded that Ernie will be a good complement to Sumai 3 for FHB-resistance breeding. The inheritance of resistance has been studied through conventional six-generation means analysis. Four genes appear to type II resistance. Mapping populations were developed to facilitate molecular-genetic analyses of other, potentially novel, sources of resistance including doubled haploid lines of the resistant germplasm Quaderna and Colorben 4 from Italy, Seu Seun 6 from South Korea and two Chinese land race accessions. A set of RILs was also developed to study resistance in Truman. Haplotype data suggest that none of these lines contain markers for known FHB sources of resistance. The set was preliminarily phenotyped in the greenhouse in 2006. Validation studies of four QTLs associated with traits related to scab resistance in Ernie are underway. During this period, approximately 8500 accessions from Asia, Eastern Europe and South America, acquired from the USDA National Small Grains collection were evaluated for types I (reduced incidence) and II (severity) resistance and for kernel quality. Numerous lines with type II resistance levels of less than 10% infection have been identified, many of which are landraces. Many lines were distributed to members of the U.S. Wheat and Barley Scab Initiative (USWBSI). Introgression of resistance genes from unadapted sources is underway using the widely-adapted moderately resistant recurrent parents, Ernie, Roane, Truman, and Bess. Approximately 200 resistant lines were haplotyped using 41 SSR markers associated with known sources of resistance to FHB. Data suggest that many of these sources differ from Sumai 3 and therefore should provide valuable resistance genes for pyramiding with those from Sumai 3 to build better levels of FHB resistance in US wheats. PARTICIPANTS: Principle Investigator: Dr. Anne L. McKendry Research Staff at the University of Missouri: David Tague, Research Specialist; Kara Bestgen, Research Specialist; Ray Wright, Research Specialist; Maureen O'Day, Research Specialist; Leslie Shaw, Research Specialist; Julie Solomon, Senior Research Laboratory Technician; Dr. Shuyu Liu, Doctoral Student; Zewdie Abate, Doctoral Student; Dr. Huanjun Lu, Postdoctoral Fellow Partner Organizations: U.S. Wheat and Barley Scab Initiative provided funding through the USDA-ARS for the Fusarium head blight research. TARGET AUDIENCES: Target groups include scientists (wheat breeders, pathologists, molecular geneticists) who are reached through peer-reviewed literature and growers who are reached through variety release and publication of the Missouri Winter Wheat Performance Test bulletins.

Impacts
Fusarium head blight (FHB) is a devastating disease of winter wheat in moist humid regions. It has been an increasingly serious in the northern Corn Belt region of the Soft Red Winter Wheat region of the United States due to increases in both reduced tillage and corn acreage, both of which contribute to higher inoculum loads. Fusarium head blight not only reduces yield directly but also reduces grain quality as the causal agent, Fusarium graminearum Schwabe (teleomorph Gibberella zeae (Schwein.) produces the mycotoxin deoxynivalenol which contaminates the grain. This project has led to the development and release of the highly productive, widely adapted, FHB resistant soft red winter wheat varieties Truman and Bess. Both lines have broadly based resistance including low incidence, reduced spread of the pathogen in the head, low DON and good kernel quality retention under high disease pressure. Truman and Bess have arguably the best FHB resistance in U.S. winter wheat and provide an immediate benefit to the wheat economy in regions of the U.S. impacted by this disease and increase the safety of wheat-based foods. Both varieties have been widely adopted by growers throughout the soft red winter wheat regions. Most recent data for Truman indicates that it is grown from Eastern Kansas to New York State. Ernie, released by the University of Missouri was among the first FHB resistant cultivars in the US and has been widely grown in Missouri and surrounding counties since its release in 1994. Conventional and molecular-genetic analysis of the resistance in this line has led to the conclusion that this source of resistance is different from and complementary to the wide-used source of resistance, Sumai 3. Markers linked with quantitative trait loci (QTL) alleles that are associated with type II resistance in Ernie have been identified and disseminated through peer-reviewed literature. They are publically available for use through marker-assisted-selection. Finally, several other sources of FHB resistance have been identified and verified over the past 5 years that potentially will provide breeders with additional novel sources of resistance to complement those currently in use. Combining various sources and types of resistance is expected to generate lines with higher levels of resistance, more effective resistance under high inoculum loads, and/or varieties in which resistance is more stable over broad geographic areas. This knowledge should accelerate the development of highly resistant winter wheat varieties which will lessen the economic losses associated with FHB in wheat thereby strengthening the farm economy nationally.

Publications

  • Abate, Z., D.N. Tague, A.L. McKendry. 2006. Diallel analysis of Fusarium head blight resistance in genetically diverse winter wheat germplasm. In: Canty, S.M., Clark, A, and Van Sanford, D. (Eds.), Proceedings of the National Fusarium Head Blight Forum; 2006 Dec. 10-12; Research Triangle Park, North Carolina. pp 73-77.
  • Abate, Z., S. Liu, and A.L. McKendry. 2006. QTL associated with low deoxynivalenol and kernel quality retention in the Fusarium head blight ressitant cultivar Ernie. In: Canty, S.M., Clark, A, and Van Sanford, D. (Eds.), Proceedings of the National Fusarium Head Blight Forum; 2006 Dec. 10-12; Research Triangle Park, North Carolina. pp 78-82.
  • McKendry, A.L., L.E. Sweets, R.L. Wright, D.N. Tague, and K.S. Bestgen. 2000. 2000 Missouri Winter Wheat Performance Tests. Special Report 529. Missouri Agricultural Experiment Station. College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources. University of Missouri-Columbia.
  • McKendry, A.L., L.E. Sweets, R.L. Wright, D.N. Tague, K.S. Bestgen. 2001. 2001 Missouri Winter Wheat Performance Tests. Special Report 536. Missouri Agricultural Experiment Station, College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources, University of Missouri-Columbia. July 2001
  • McKendry, A.L., R.L. Wright, D.N. Tague, K.S. Bestgen, M.H. O'Day. 2002. 2002 Missouri Winter Wheat Performance Tests. Special Report 542, Missouri Agricultural Experiment Station, College of Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources, University of Missouri-Columbia. July 2002.
  • McKendry, A. L., D. N. Tague, and K. Ross. 2001. comparative Effects of 1BL.1RS and 1AL.1RS on Soft Red Winter Wheat Milling and Baking Quality. Crop Sci. 41:712-720.
  • Rudd, J.C., R.D. Horsley, A.L. McKendry, E.M. Elias. 2001. Host Plant Resistance Genes for Fusarium Head Blight: Sources, Mechanisms and Utility in Conventional Breeding Systems. Crop Sci. 41:620-627
  • McKendry, A.L., D.N. Tague, R.L. Wright, J.A. Tremain, and S.P. Conley. 2005. Registration of Truman Wheat. Crop Science Vol 45:421-422.
  • S. Liu, A.Z. Abate, and A.L. McKendry. 2005. Inheritance of Fusarium head blight resistance in the soft red winter wheat Ernie. Theor. Appl. Genet. 110:454-461.
  • R. A. Browne, J.P. Murphy, B.M. Cooke, D. Devaney, C.A. Griffey, J. Hancock, S.A. Harrison, F.L. Kolb, A.L. McKendry, E.A. Milus, C. Sneller, and D.A. Van Sanford. 2005. Evaluation of components of Fusarium head blight resistance in soft red winter wheat germ plasm using a detached leaf assay. Plant Disease 89:404-411
  • McKendry, A. L., J. P. Murphy, K. S. Bestgen, R. Navarro, and M. H. O'Day. 2001. Resistance to Fusarium Head Blight in Accessions from the Balkans: A Progress Report. p. 194-197. In: Proceeding of the 2001 National Fusarium Head Blight Forum. Erlanger, KY Dec. 8-10, 2001.
  • McKendry, A. L., K. S. Bestgen, and M. H. O'Day. 2001. Types I and II Resistance to Fusarium Head Blight in Asian and Italian Germplasm. p. 198. In: Proceeding of the 2001 National Fusarium Head Blight Forum. Erlanger, KY Dec. 8-10, 2001.
  • McKendry, A.L., K.S. Bestgen, and D.N. Tague. 2002. Types I, II and field resistance to Fusarium head blight in winter and spring wheat germplasm. In 2002 National Fusarium Head Blight Forum Proceedings. P 204-207.
  • Liu, S. T. Musket, A.L. McKendry, and G.L. Davis. 2002. Identification of QTL associated with scab resistance in Ernie. In 2002 National Fusarium Head Blight Forum Proceedings. P 204-207.
  • McKendry, A.L., R.L. Wright, D.N. Tague, K.S. Bestgen, M.H. O'Day. 2002. 2002 Missouri Winter Wheat Performance Tests. Special Report 542, Missouri Agricultural Experiment Station, College of Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources, University of Missouri-Columbia. July 2002.
  • McKendry, A.L., T. Musket, D. Davis, Z. Abate, and G. Davis. 2003. Molecular Genetic Diversity of Geographically Diverse Scab Resistant Wheat Lines. Presented at the 2003 National Fusarium Head Blight Forum in Bloomington, MN. P. 224
  • Liu, S., H. Lu, G. Davis, A.L. McKendry. 2003. Genetic studies of scab resistance in the soft red winter wheat, 'Ernie'. Presented at the 2003 National Fusarium Head Blight Forum in Bloomington, MN. P. 21-23.
  • A.L. McKendry, S. Liu, Z. A. Abate, and G.L. Davis. 2004. Inheritance of Fusarium head blight resistance in the US wheat cultivar 'Ernie'. In: Canty, S.M., Boring, T., Wardwell, J. and Ward, R.W. (Eds). Proceedings of the 2nd International Symposium on Fusarium Head Blight; incorporating the 8th European Fusarium Seminar; 2004, 11-15 December; Orlando, FL, USA. Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI pp 107-110.
  • McKendry, A.L., R.L. Wright, D.N. Tague, J.A. Tremain, and L.J. Shaw. 2003. 2003 Missouri Winter Wheat Performance Tests. Missouri Agricultural Experiment Station, College of Agriculture Food and Natural Resources, Special Report 549, 28 pages.
  • McKendry, A. L., R. L. Wright, D.N. Tague, J. A. Tremain, and L. J. Shaw. 2004. 2004 Missouri Winter Wheat Performance Tests. Special Report 555. Missouri Agricultural Experiment Station, College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources, University of Missouri-Columbia. July 2004. pp 28
  • McKendry, A.L., L.J. Shaw, and J.A. Tremain. 2004. Evaluation of Fusarium resistant germplasm introduced through the USWBSI/CIMMYT collaboration. In: Canty, S.M., Boring, T., Wardwell, J. and Ward, R.W. (Eds). Proceedings of the 2nd International Symposium on Fusarium Head Blight; incorporating the 8th European Fusarium Seminar; 2004, 11-15 December; Orlando, FL, USA. Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI pp 103-106.
  • R. A. Browne, J.P. Murphy, B.M. Cooke, D. Devaney, C.A. Griffey, J. Hancock, S.A. Harrison, F.L. Kolb, A.L. McKendry, E.A. Milus, C. Sneller, and D.A. Van Sanford. 2005. Identification of Fusarium head blight resistance in soft red winter wheat germplasm using a detached leaf assay. In: Canty, S.M., Boring, T., Wardwell, J. and Ward, R.W. (Eds). Proceedings of the 2nd International Symposium on Fusarium Head Blight; incorporating the 8th European Fusarium Seminar; 2004, 11-15 December; Orlando, FL, USA. Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI pp 22.
  • Abate, Z.A., and A.L. McKendry. 2005. Quantitative trait loci associated with reduced deoxynivalenol in the soft red winter wheat Ernie. In: Proceedings of the 2005 National Fusarium Head Blight Forum, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Dec 11-13, 2005. p 3-5
  • McKendry, A.L., R.L. Wright, D.N. Tague, J.A. Tremain, and L.J. Shaw. 2005. 2005 Missouri Winter Wheat Performance Tests. Special Report 560. Missouri Agricultural Experiment Station, College of Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources, University of Missouri-Columbia. July 2005. 27 pages
  • McKendry, A.L., R.L. Wright, D.N. Tague, J.A. Tremain, J.K. Solomon. 2006. 2006 Missouri Winter Wheat Performance Tests. Special Report 656. Missouri Agricultural Experiment Station. College of Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources. University of Missouri-Columbia. 27 pages.


Progress 01/01/05 to 12/31/05

Outputs
The major objective of the Small Grains Breeding Program is to develop varieties of soft red winter wheat and/or enhanced germplasm with improved grain yield, quality and disease resistance. Research in 2005 continued to focus on the identification and genetic analyses of new sources of resistance to Fusarium head blight (scab). Several new incidental sources of resistance, comparable to or better than the soft red winter wheat cultivar, Ernie, have been identified from Missouri breeding germplasm including Bess, which was released in 2005 and classified in the Winter Wheat Scab Nursery as resistant in all seven categories of resistance measured. Bess (tested as MO 981020), has levels of resistance comparable to Truman which was released in 2004. It is an early maturing, full-sib of Truman, heading approximately 6 days earlier than Truman. Both Truman and Bess are widely adapted across the northern U.S. Corn Belt, Western Ontario Canada and the U.S. Mid-south regions. A set of recombinant inbred lines (RILs) for molecular genetic analyses of the source of resistance in Truman is nearing completion and the first phenotyping of F7 RILs will be done in 2006. Validation studies of four QTLs associated with traits related to scab resistance in Ernie are underway. Approximately 7500 accessions from Asia, Eastern Europe and South America, acquired from the USDA National Small Grains collection have been evaluated for types I (reduced incidence) and II (severity) resistance and for kernel quality since the project began in 1999. Numerous lines with type II resistance levels of less than 10% infection have been identified, many of which are landraces. Many lines have been distributed to members of the U.S. Wheat and Barley Scab Initiative (USWBSI) while resistance in other accessions is being verified. Introgression of resistance genes from unadapted sources is underway using the widely-adapted moderately resistant recurrent parents, Ernie, Roane, Truman, and Bess. Finally, 150 germplasm lines with high levels of resistance to Fusarium head blight, were haplotyped using 41 SSR markers associated with known sources of resistance to Fusarium head blight. These germplasm lines included winter and spring wheat lines either from the National Small Grains Collection and screened for resistance at Missouri, or introduced through a collaboration the University of Missouri had with CIMMYT. Our data (which will be submitted for publication in 2006), suggest that many of these sources differ from Sumai 3 and therefore should provide valuable resistance genes for pyramiding with those from Sumai 3 to build better levels of Fusarium head blight resistance in US wheats.

Impacts
Fusarium head blight (scab) has caused serious losses in both the yield and quality of wheat. The development of scab resistant winter wheat requires identification and genetic characterization of new sources of resistance thereby enabling breeders to put different resistance genes into wheat varieties. This should lead to higher yields and greater economic returns for wheat farmers world-wide.

Publications

  • R. A. Browne, J.P. Murphy, B.M. Cooke, D. Devaney, E.J. Walsh, C.A. Griffey, J.A. Hancock, S.A. Harrison, P. Hart, F.L. Kolb, A.L. McKendry, E.A. Milus, C. Sneller, and D.A. Van Sanford. 2005.Evaluation of Components of Fusarium head blight resistance in soft red winter wheat germ plasm using a detached leaf assay. 2005. Plant Dis. 89:404-411.
  • S. Liu, A.Z. Abate, and A.L. McKendry. 2005. Inheritance of Fusarium head blight resistance in the soft red winter wheat Ernie. Theor. Appl. Genet. 110:454-461.
  • McKendry, A.L., D.N. Tague, R.L. Wright, J.A. Tremain, and S.P. Conley. 2005. Registration of Truman Wheat. Crop Science Vol 45:421-422.
  • McKendry, A.L., R.L. Wright, D.N. Tague, J.A. Tremain, L.J. Shaw. 2005 Missouri Winter Wheat Performance Tests. Special Report 560. Missouri Agricultural Experiment Station, College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources, University of Missouri-Columbia. July 2005. 27 pages.
  • McKendry, A.L. 2005. Sources of Fusarium head blight resistance in wheat: diversity and utilization. In: Proceedings of the 2005 National Fusarium Head Blight Forum, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Dec 11-13, 2005. p 63.
  • Abate, Z.A., and A.L. McKendry. 2005. Quantitative trait loci associated with reduced deoxynivalenol in the soft red winter wheat Ernie. In: Proceedings of the 2005 National Fusarium Head Blight Forum, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Dec 11-13, 2005. p 3-5


Progress 01/01/04 to 12/31/04

Outputs
The major objective of the Small Grains Breeding Program is to develop varieties of soft red winter wheat and/or enhanced germplasm with improved grain yield, quality and disease resistance. Research in 2004 continued to focus on the identification and genetic analyses of new sources of resistance to Fusarium head blight (scab). Several new incidental sources of resistance, comparable to or better than the soft red winter wheat cultivar, Ernie, have been identified from Missouri breeding germplasm including the newly released line, Truman, which was classified in the Winter Wheat Scab Nursery of 2002 as resistant in all seven categories of resistance measured. A second line, Bess (tested as MO 981020), which also has levels of resistance comparable to Truman will be released in 2005. Both varieties are widely adapted across the northern U.S. Corn Belt, Western Ontario Canada and the U.S. Mid-south regions. Population development for molecular genetic analyses of the source of resistance in Truman is underway. Validation studies of four QTLs associated with traits related to scab resistance in Ernie are underway. Approximately 7000 accessions from Asia, Eastern Europe and South America, acquired from the USDA National Small Grains collection have been evaluated for types I (reduced incidence) and II (severity) resistance and for kernel quality since the project began in 1999. Numerous lines with type II resistance levels of less than 10% infection have been identified, many of which are landraces. Many lines have been distributed to members of the U.S. Wheat and Barley Scab Initiative (USWBSI) while resistance in other accessions is being verified. Introgression of resistance genes from unadapted sources is underway using the widely-adapted moderately resistant recurrent parents, Roane, Truman, and Bess. Segregating populations and/or advanced generation lines will be made available to winter wheat breeders once resistance and agronomic performance is improved. Finally, both winter and spring wheats introduced into the U.S. through the USWBSI collaboration with CIMMYT were evaluated for resistance at Missouri. Of 33 winter wheats screened, 17 had a scab index of less than 10% infection in inoculated heads. The range was 2.5% to 64% compared to a range of 2.8% (Truman) to 10.7% (Ernie) in the checks. Of 37 spring wheats acquired through CIMMYT, 14 had an index of less than 10%. These sources of resistance were distributed to interested breeders in the fall of 2004 thereby providing those working on scab resistance in both spring and winter wheat regions with alternative sources of resistance to Fusarium head blight. Once incorporated into adapted germplasm, resistance levels in US wheat varieties should be improved.

Impacts
Fusarium head blight (scab) has caused serious losses in both the yield and quality of wheat. The development of scab resistant winter wheat requires identification and genetic characterization of new sources of resistance thereby enabling breeders to put different resistance genes into wheat varieties. This should lead to higher yields and greater economic returns for wheat farmers world-wide.

Publications

  • Browne, R.A.,Murphy, J.P., Cooke, B.M., Devaney, D., Griffey, C.A., Hancock, J.A., Harrison, S.A., Kolb, F.L., McKendry, A.L., Milus, E.A., Sneller, C. and Van Sanford, D.A. 2004. Identification of Fusarium head blight resistance in soft red winter wheat germplasm using a detached leaf assay. In: Canty, S.M., Boring, T., Wardwell, J. and Ward, R.W. (Eds). Proceedings of the 2nd International Symposium on Fusarium Head Blight; incorporating the 8th European Fusarium Seminar; 2004, 11-15 December; Orlando, FL, USA. Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI pp 22.
  • McKendry, A.L., Liu, S., Abate, Z.A. and Davis, G.L. 2004. Inheritance of Fusarium head blight resistance in the US wheat cultivar 'Ernie'. In: Canty, S.M., Boring, T., Wardwell, J. and Ward, R.W. (Eds). Proceedings of the 2nd International Symposium on Fusarium Head Blight; incorporating the 8th European Fusarium Seminar; 2004, 11-15 December; Orlando, FL, USA. Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI pp 107-110.
  • McKendry, A.L., Shaw, L.J. and Tremain, J.A. 2004. Evaluation of Fusarium resistant germplasm introduced through the USWBSI/CIMMYT collaboration. In: Canty, S.M., Boring, T., Wardwell, J. and Ward, R.W. (Eds). Proceedings of the 2nd International Symposium on Fusarium Head Blight; incorporating the 8th European Fusarium Seminar; 2004, 11-15 December; Orlando, FL, USA. Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI pp 103-106.
  • McKendry, A. L., Wright, R.L., Tague, D.N., Tremain, J.A. and L. J. Shaw. 2004. 2004 Missouri Winter Wheat Performance Tests. Special Report 555. Missouri Agricultural Experiment Station, College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources, University of Missouri-Columbia. July 2004. pp 28


Progress 01/01/03 to 12/31/03

Outputs
The major objective of the Small Grains Breeding Program is to develop varieties of soft red winter wheat and/or enhanced germplasm with improved grain yield, quality and disease resistance. Research in 2003 continued to focus on the identification of new sources of resistance to Fusarium head blight (scab). Approximately 6000 accessions from Asia, Eastern Europe and South America, acquired from the USDA National Small Grains collection have been evaluated for types I (reduced incidence) and II (severity) resistance and for kernel quality since the project began in 1999. Numerous lines with type II resistance levels of less than 10% infection have been identified, many of which are landraces. Resistance in these accessions are under various stages of verification and increase for distribution to members of the U.S. Wheat and Barley Scab Initiative. Population development for conventional and molecular genetic studies of the best of these sources of resistance has been initiated in collaboration with Dr. Mujeeb Kazi at CIMMYT. Molecular genetic diversity analysis for a set of 200 lines with scab resistance using AFLP markers was completed in 2003 and cluster analyses indicated 2 major clusters with one cluster containing major 2 subgroups. Results indicated that most U.S. breeding lines containing scab resistance were genetically different from South American, European, Asian and CIMMYT germplasm suggesting that US germplasm may contain novel genes for scab resistance. Publication of this work is in progress. Several new incidental sources of resistance, comparable to or better than the soft red winter wheat cultivar, Ernie, have been identified from Missouri breeding germplasm including the newly released line, Truman (tested as MO 980525), which was classified in the Winter Wheat Scab Nursery of 2002 as resistant in all seven categories of resistance measured. A second line, MO 981020, which also has levels of resistance comparable to Truman is being considered for release in 2004. Molecular and conventional genetic analyses of the source of resistance in Truman have been initiated including QTL analysis of a doubled haploid mapping population and generation means analysis, respectively. Conventional and molecular genetic studies of the scab resistance identified in the soft red winter wheat Ernie were completed in 2003. Five QTLs were identified that were associated with traits related to scab resistance. These QTLs differed from those identified in Sumai 3. Two of the QTLs in Ernie were considered novel. Conventional analysis indicated that 4 additive genes were associated with the Fusarium head blight index (incidence x severity) while 2 genes were associated with disease spread within the head. Publication of this work is in progress.

Impacts
Fusarium head blight (scab) has caused serious losses in both the yield and quality of wheat. The development of scab resistant winter wheat requires identification and genetic characterization of new sources of resistance thereby enabling breeders to put different resistance genes into wheat varieties. This should lead to higher yields and greater economic returns for wheat farmers world-wide.

Publications

  • A.L. McKendry, R.L. Wright, D.N. tague, J.A. Tremain, L.J. Shaw. 2003. 2003 Missouri Winter Wheat Performance Tests. Special Report 549. Missouri Agricultural Experiment Station. College of Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources, University of Missouri-Columbia. July 2003. 27 pages.


Progress 01/01/02 to 12/31/02

Outputs
The major objective of the Small Grains Breeding Program is to develop varieties of soft red winter wheat and/or enhanced germplasm with improved grain yield, quality and disease resistance. Research in 2002 continued to focus on the identification of new sources of resistance to Fusarium head blight (scab). Approximately 4600 accessions from Asia, Eastern Europe and South America, acquired from the USDA National Small Grains collection have been evaluated for types I and II resistance and for kernel quality since the project began in 1999. These evaluations have been done in both the greenhouse and field environments. Numerous lines with type II resistance levels of less than 10% infection have been identified to date, many of which are landraces. Many of these lines also have reduced incidence (type I resistance) and all have good kernel quality under inoculation. Resistance in these accessions are under various stages of verification and increase for distribution to members of the U.S. Wheat and Barley Scab Initiative. Population development for conventional and molecular genetic studies of the best of these sources of resistance has been initiated in collaboration with Dr. Mujeeb Kazi at CIMMYT. Molecular genetic diversity analysis is underway for a set of 200 lines with scab resistance using AFLP and SSR markers. Several new incidental sources of resistance, comparable to or better than the soft red winter wheat cultivar, Ernie, have been identified from Missouri breeding germplasm including the breeding lines MO 980829 and MO 981020. These lines and others of the same pedigree including MO 980525 have been classified in the Winter Wheat Scab Nurseries of 2001 and 2002 as resistant in all seven categories of resistance measured. Genetic analyses of these sources of resistance have been initiated and MO 980525, which has excellent yield potential in the Northern Corn Belt states, is being considered for release in 2003. Conventional and molecular genetic studies of the scab resistance identified in the soft red winter wheat Ernie are nearing completion.

Impacts
Fusarium head blight (scab) has caused serious losses in both the yield and quality of wheat. The development of scab resistant winter wheat requires identification and genetic characterization of new sources of resistance thereby enabling breeders to put different resistance genes into wheat varieties. This should lead to higher yields and greater economic returns for wheat farmers world-wide.

Publications

  • McKendry, A.L., R.L. Wright, D.N. Tague, K.S. Bestgen, and M. H. O'Day. 2002. 2002 Missouri Winter Wheat Performance Tests. Special Report 542. Missouri Agricultural Experiment Station, College of AGriculture, Food and Natural Resources. University of Missouri-Columbia. July 2002. 27 pages.


Progress 01/01/01 to 12/31/01

Outputs
The major objective of the Small Grains Breeding Program is to develop varieties of soft red winter wheat and/or enhanced germplasm with improved grain yield, quality and disease resistance. Research in 2001 focused primarily on the identification of new sources of resistance to Fusarium head blight (scab). Approximately 2000 accessions from Balkans were acquired from the USDA National Small Grains collection and evaluated for Type II resistance and kernel quality under single floret inoculation in 2000 and 2001. Fifty-nine accessions were identified as having Type II resistance comparable to 'Sumai 3'and/or 'Ernie'(the resistant checks)coupled with excellent kernel quality and good field Type I resistance. The majority of resistant lines were landraces. Resistance in these accessions was verified and seed is being increased from purified lines for distribution to members of the U.S. Wheat and Barley Scab Initiative. Greenhouse based verification of Type I and II resistance in 50 Asian and Italian winter wheat germplasm accessions was completed and results will be published in 2002. Population development for conventional and molecular genetic studies of these sources of resistance has been initiated in collaboration with Dr. Mujeeb Kazi at CIMMYT. Several new incidental sources of resistance, comparable to the soft red winter wheat cultivar, Ernie, have been identified from Missouri breeding germplasm including the breeding lines MO 980525 and MO 981020. These lines were entered into the 2001 Winter Wheat Scab Nursery and were the only lines classified as resistant in all seven categories of resistance measured. Genetic analyses of these sources of resistance have been initiated and MO 980525, which has excellent yield potential in the Northern Corn Belt states, is being considered for release in 2002. Conventional and molecular genetic studies of the scab resistance identified in the soft red winter wheat Ernie are nearing completion.

Impacts
Fusarium head blight (scab) has caused serious losses in both the yield and quality of wheat. The development of scab resistant winter wheat requires identification and genetic characterization of new sources of resistance thereby enabling breeders to put different resistance genes into wheat varieties. This should lead to higher yields and greater economic returns for wheat farmers world-wide.

Publications

  • Rudd, J.C., Horsley, R.D., McKendry, A.L., and Elias, E.M. 2001. Host plant resistance genes for Fusarium head blight: sources, mechanisms and utility in conventional breeding systems. Crop Sci. 41:620-627.
  • McKendry, A.L., Murphy, J.P., Bestgen, K.S., Navarro, R., and O'Day, M.H. 2001. Resistance to Fusarium head blight in accessions from the Balkans: a progress report. p. 194-197. In: Proceedings of the 2001 National Fusarium Head Blight Forum. Erlanger, KY Dec. 8-10, 2001.
  • McKendry, A.L., Bestgen, K.S., and O'Day, M.H. 2001. Types I and II resistance to Fusarium head blight in Asian and Italian germplasm. p.198. In: Proceedings of the 2001 National Fusarium Head Blight Forum. Erlanger, KY Dec. 8-10, 2001.
  • McKendry, A.L., Sweets, L.E., Wright, R.L., Tague, D.N., Bestgen, K.S. 2001. 2001 Missouri Winter Wheat Performance Tests. Special Report 536. Missouri Agricultural Experiment Station, College of Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources, University of Missouri-Columbia. July 2001.


Progress 01/02/00 to 12/31/00

Outputs
The major objective of the Small Grains Breeding Program is to develop varieties of soft red winter wheat and/or enhanced germplasm with improved grain yield, quality and disease resistance. Research in 2000 focused on the identification of new sources of resistance to Fusarium head blight (scab). Approximately 1000 accessions from Yugoslavia were acquired from the USDA National Small Grains collection and evaluated for Type II resistance and kernel quality under single floret inoculation. Twenty-nine accessions were identified as having Type II resistance comparable to 'Sumai 3' coupled with excellent kernel quality and good field Type I resistance. The majority of resistant lines were landraces. Resistance in these accessions was verified and seed is being increased from purified lines for distribution to members of the National Wheat and Barley Scab Initiative. Greenhouse based evaluation of Type I resistance of Asian and Italian winter wheat germplasm, previously being identified as having good Type II resistance, led to the identification of 20 accessions with good Type I resistance. Included were 8 cultivated lines from China, 7 Chinese landraces, 1 Italian landrace, 2 Italian cultivars, 1 Japanese cultivar and 1 cultivar from South Korea. Population development for conventional and molecular genetic studies of these sources of resistance has been initiated. Several new incidental sources of resistance, comparable to that found in the soft red winter wheat cultivar, Ernie, have been identified from Missouri breeding germplasm. Genetic analyses of these sources of resistance have been initiated. Conventional and molecular genetic studies of the scab resistance identified in the soft red winter wheat Ernie are now underway. Finally, studies on the stability of scab resistance in 20 different wheat genetic backgrounds against diverse array of 5 isolates from the eastern United States are completed and results will be published in 2001.

Impacts
Fusarium head blight (scab) has caused serious losses in both the yield and quality of wheat. The development of scab resistant winter wheat requires identification and genetic characterization of new sources of resistance thereby enabling breeders to put different resistance genes into wheat varieties. This should lead to higher yields and greater economic returns for wheat farmers world-wide.

Publications

  • McKendry, A.L., J.P. Murphy, K.S. Bestgen, and R. Navaro. 2000. Evaluation of Yugoslavian winter wheat germplasm for resistance to Fusarium head blight. In: Proceedings of the 2000 National Fusarium Head Blight Forum, Dec. 10-12, 2000, Cincinnati, OH. p.215-219.
  • McKendry, A.L., K. S. Bestgen, D. N. Tague, R. Wright, and B. Imhoff. 2000. Greenhouse based evaluation of Asian and Italian winter wheat germplasm for type I resistance to Fusarium head blight. 2000. In: Proceedings of the 2000 National Fusarium Head Blight Forum, Dec. 10-12, 2000, Cincinnati, OH. p.205-208
  • McKendry, A.L., D.N. Tague, K. Ross. 2001.Comparative Effects of 1BL.1RS and 1AL.1RS on soft red winter wheat milling and baking quality. Crop Science. In press.
  • McKendry, A.L., L.E. Sweets, R.L. Wright, D.N. Tague, and K.S. Bestgen. 2000. 2000 Missouri Winter Wheat Performance Tests. Special Report 529. Missouri Agricultural Experiment Station. College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources. University of Missouri-Columbia.


Progress 01/01/99 to 12/31/99

Outputs
The major objective of the Small Grains Breeding Program is to develop varieties of soft red winter wheat and/or enhanced germplasm with improved grain yield, quality and disease resistance. Research in 1999 focused primarily on the identification of new sources of resistance to Fusarium head blight (scab). Approximately 1000 accessions from China, Japan, Korea, Brazil and Italy were acquired from the USDA National Small Grains collection and evaluated for Type II resistance and kernel quality under single floret inoculation. Accessions included landraces, breeding lines, cultivars and cultivated lines. Seventeen accessions were identified as having Type II resistance comparable to 'Sumai 3' coupled with excellent kernel quality. Resistant accessions included 7 Chinese landraces, 4 Chinese cultivated accessions, 2 Italian landraces, the Italian cultivars Quaderna and Cerere, the Japanese cultivar Norin 50 and the South Korean cultivar Seu Seun 6. Resistance in these accessions was verified and seed is being increased from purified lines for distribution to members of the National Wheat and Barley Scab Initiative. Assessment of Type I resistance in these accessions will be completed in the field during the summer of 2000. Population development for conventional and molecular genetic studies of these sources of resistance was initiated with selected accessions. Within the breeding program, 120 soft red winter wheat breeding lines were screened for Type II and Type III resistance to scab. Thirty-four of these lines showed good levels of resistance compared to the resistant checks 'Ernie' and Sumai 3. Population development for conventional and molecular genetic studies of the scab resistance identified in the soft red winter wheat Ernie are nearing completion. Molecular mapping of this source of scab resistance is expected to begin in the fall of 2000. Finally, studies on the stability of scab resistance in 20 different wheat genetic backgrounds are proceeding using a diverse array of 5 isolates from the eastern United States.

Impacts
Fusarium head blight (scab) has caused serious losses in both the yield and quality of wheat world-wide. This project focuses on accelerating the development of scab resistant winter wheat through the identification and genetic characterization of new sources of scab resistance. This information will enable breeders to put different resistance genes into winter wheat thereby leading to higher yields and greater economic returns for wheat farmers world-wide.

Publications

  • McKendry, A.L., L. E. Sweets, R. L. Wright, D. N. Tague, K. S. Salzman, and R.E. Mattas. 1999. 1999 Missouri Winter Wheat Performance Tests. Special Report 526. Missouri Agricultural Experiment Station. College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources. University of Missouri-Columbia.


Progress 01/01/98 to 12/31/98

Outputs
The major objective of the Small Grains Breeding Program is to develop varieties of soft red winter wheat and/or enhanced germplasm with improved grain yield, quality and disease resistance. Research in 1998 focused on the genetics of resistance to Septoria tritici blotch and the identification of new sources of resistance to Fusarium head blight (scab). Genetic studies of Septoria resistance identified in the Triticum tauschii accessions TA2470 and TA2479, acquired from the repository of lines held at the Wheat Genetics Resources Center at Kansas State University, was completed. Resistance in TA 2470 was conditioned by a single dominant gene. Resistance in TA2479 was quantitatively inherited and adequately explained by an additive gene model. Estimation of genetic effects suggested the presence of four genes conferring resistance. The identification of new sources of resistance to scab was intensified with funding from the National Fusarium Head Blight Initiative. Missouri is actively screening accessions from the USDA National Small Grains Collection for resistance. Currently, 1000 accessions from China, Japan, Korea, Brazil and Italy are being evaluated for Type II resistance under single floret inoculation. Studies on the stability of resistances in 25 different wheat genetic backgrounds are proceeding using a diverse array of 5 isolates from the eastern United States. Conventional and molecular genetic studies of the scab resistance identified in the soft red winter wheat Ernie are ongoing.

Impacts
(N/A)

Publications

  • Rauh, B.E. 1998. Inheritance and RFLP mapping of resistance to Septoria tritici blotch in Triticum tauschii. MS Thesis.
  • McKendry, A.L., L.E. Sweets, R.L. Wright, D.N. Tague, and R.E. Mattas. 1998. 1998 Missouri Winter Wheat Performance Tests. Special Report 512. Missouri Agricultural Experiment Station, College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources, University of Missouri, Columbia.


Progress 01/01/97 to 12/31/97

Outputs
The major objective of the Small Grains Breeding Program is to develop varieties of soft red winter wheat and/or enhanced germplasm with improved grain yield, quality and resistance to disease, insect and weather hazards. Research in 1997 focused on the genetics of resistance to Septoria tritici blotch identified in the Triticum tauschii. The source of resistance identified in TA 2470 was determined to be a single dominant gene. RFLP mapping of this and other resistance genes is underway. In 1997, a three location study of near-isolines in five soft red winter wheat backgrounds, containing either T1BL.1RS or T1AL.1RS (wheat-rye translocation) was conducted. The presence of either translocation reduced adjusted flour yield, and softness equivalent and increased alkaline water retention capacity of the flour. Although the effects of both translocations were highly significant, the effect of the 1AL.1RS translocation was more detrimental than that of the 1BL.1RS translocation. For both milling and baking quality traits, the detrimental effects of these translocations varied with genetic background. Research into Fusarium head blight (scab) resistance in soft wheats focused on a genotype x isolate interaction study with 5 diverse isolates and 33 soft red winter wheats reported to have some level of scab resistance. Additionally, 400 advanced breeding lines were screened. Levels of Type II resistance comparable to Ernie were identified in several lines.

Impacts
(N/A)

Publications

  • KEPHART, K. D., A. L. MCKENDRY, M. K. KROENING, D. N. TAGUE, AND R. E. MATTIS. 1997. 1997 Missouri winter wheat performance tests. Special Report 506. Missouri AES, College of Agr, Food, Nat. Res.


Progress 01/01/96 to 12/30/96

Outputs
Certified seed of Ernie', a soft red winter wheat released in 1994, was produced. Research in 1996 focused on the genetics of resistance to Septoria tritici blotch, (Mycosphaerella graminicola (F#ckel) Schroeter (anamorph, Septoria tritici Rob ex Desm)) identified in the Triticum tauschii accessions. Classical genetic studies as well as RFLP mapping of these resistance genes in T. tauschii are currently underway. Results will be used to transfer Septoria resistance from T. tauschii into soft red winter wheat. Studies on the agronomic effects of wheat-rye translocations in soft red winter wheats were also continued in 1996. In a study of near-isolines involving five soft red winter wheat backgrounds, both the 1BL.1RS and 1AL.1RS translocations resulted in significant reductions in both milling and baking quality of soft red winter wheats. The presence of either translocation resulted in significant reductions in adjusted flour yield, and softness of the flour while increasing significantly protein and the alkaline water retention capacity of the flour. Although the effects of both translocations were highly significant, the effects of the 1AL.1RS translocation were more detrimental than those of the 1BL.1RS translocation. For both milling and baking quality traits, the detrimental effects of these translocations varied with genetic background and were less than the effect of background alone.

Impacts
(N/A)

Publications

  • McKendry, A. L., D. N. Tague, and K. E. Miskin. 1996. Effect of 1BL.1RS on agronomic traits of soft red winter wheat. Crop Science 36:844-847.
  • McKendry, A. L., D. N. Tague, P. L. Finney, and K. E. Miskin. 1996. Effect of 1BL.1RS on milling and baking quality of soft red winter wheat. Crop Science 36:848-851.
  • McKendry, A. L., D. N. Tague, and D. J. Somers. 1996. Effects of 1BL.1RS and 1AL.1RS on aluminum tolerance in soft red winter wheat. Crop Science 36:987-990.
  • McKendry, A. L. and E. A. Geden. 1996. Evaluating the productivity of universityplant breeders with teaching and research appointments. J. Nat. Resour. Life Sci. Educ. 25:175-178.
  • Kephart, K.D., A.L.McKendry, M.K. Kroening,and D.N.Tague. 1996. 1996 Missouri winter wheat performance tests. Special Report 497. MO. Agric. Exp. Sta. Collegeof Agric., Food and Nat. Res., Univ. of MO-Columbia.


Progress 01/01/95 to 12/30/95

Outputs
The major objective of the Small Grains Breeding Program is to develop and release to the public, varieties of soft red winter wheat and/or enhanced germplasm with improved grain yield, quality and resistance to disease, insect and weather hazards. The spring oat breeding program is being discontinued because of reduced funding. Research in 1995 focused on the genetics of resistance to Septoria tritici blotch, (Mycosphaerella graminicola (Fuckel) Schroeter) identified in the Triticum tauschii accessions, TA 2470 and TA 2479. Classical genetic studies showed that resistance in TA 2470 was conditioned by 1 dominant gene while that in TA 2479 was conditioned by 2 dominant genes. RFLP mapping of these genes in T. tauschii is currently underway. Studies on the agronomic effects of 1AL.1RS and 1BL.1RS in soft red winter wheats were continued in 1995. A 5 location-year study of the impact of 1BL.1RS on soft wheat quality was completed. This translocation resulted in a significant reduction in milling quality and AWRC but had no significant overall effect on baking quality. There was no effect of 1BL.1RS on grain yield. Development of set of 1BL.1RS and 1AL.1RS near-isolines in 5 soft red winter wheat genetic backgrounds was completed. These near-isolines were used to evaluate the effects of these translocations on aluminum (Al) tolerance in solution culture. Although Al tolerance varied among genetic backgrounds, neither translocation had a significant effect on Al tolerance.

Impacts
(N/A)

Publications


    Progress 01/01/94 to 12/30/94

    Outputs
    The major objective of the Small Grains Breeding Program is to develop and release to the public, varieties of soft red winter wheat and/or enhanced germplasm with improved grain yield and resistance to disease, insect and weather hazards. Reductions in funding have resulted in a significant down-sizing of the spring oat program. `Ernie' soft red winter wheat (tested as MO12256) was released from the program and will be available from the Foundation Seed Organization in August 1995. Ernie is a high yielding, high test weight, short statured wheat with maturity equal to `Clark'. Ernie is moderately resistant to Septoria tritici blotch (STB), head scab, powdery mildew and barley yellow dwarf virus, moderately susceptible to stem rust, and susceptible to leaf rust and Hessian fly. Ernie has good milling and baking quality. Research within the program in 1994 focused on genetic studies and RFLP mapping of STB resistance genes identified in Triticum tauschii and on the agronomic effects of wheat-rye translocations in soft red winter wheats. A field study of the impact of 1BL.1RS on grain yield and milling and baking quality in 80 1BL.1RS and non-rye sister lines in 2 genetic backgrounds was concluded. 1BL.1RS reduced adjusted flour yield and milling quality and increased AWRC in both backgrounds. Effects on protein, softness equivalent and test weight varied with background. Baking quality unaffected. The effect on grain yield varied with genetic background.

    Impacts
    (N/A)

    Publications


      Progress 01/01/93 to 12/30/93

      Outputs
      The major objective of the Small Grains Breeding Program is to develop and release to the public, varieties of soft red winter wheat, spring oat and/or enhanced germplasm with improved grain yield and resistance to disease, insect and weather hazards. Agronomic, disease resistance and quality data are collected annually on approximately 7,000 experimental plots and 20,000 head rows in the wheat program and on 1,500 plots and 10,000 head rows in the oat program. M012256 soft red winter wheat was approved for release in 1993 but is as yet, unnamed. Mo 12256 is a high yielding, high test weight, early maturing, short statured wheat with moderate resistance to Septoria tritici blotch, Fusarium head blight and powdery mildew. Research on resistance to Septoria tritici blotch (STB) and Fusarium head blight (FHB) was advanced in 1993. Generations required for the genetic analyses of STB resistance in Triticum speltoides were completed and STB resistance was successfully transferred from the resistant T. tauschii accession TA2377 to 'Saluda' soft red winter wheat. Commercial cultivars and T. tausehii accessions were screened for FHB resistance and significant resistance to tauschii invasion was identified. Research on the impact of wheat-rye translocations on soft red winter wheat agronomic and quality traits is ongoing. Data from 80 sister lines from two crosses suggested that the impact of 1RS.1BL on yield components varies with genetic background.

      Impacts
      (N/A)

      Publications